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Airplane Meals

Apr 11 2011
Instructions
Photo, Miniature parachutes can be seen dropping from Halvorsen's C-54

After World War II, the Allies divided Germany among themselves, and also divided its capital, Berlin. When the USSR blockaded Allied ground routes to West Berlin on June 24, 1948, crisis struck—how to get food and fuel to the West Berliners, 110 miles deep in Soviet-controlled East Germany? By air! The Berlin Airlift lasted more than 10 months, successfully flying supplies into West Berlin.

  1. American forces called the airlift Operation Plainfare.

    True

    False

  2. When the airlift began, the U.S. military believed it would succeed in outlasting the Soviet blockade.

    True

    False

  3. The head authority in West Berlin approved of and supported the airlift.

    True

    False

  4. When the blockade began, West Berlin had three airports.

    True

    False