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Potent Quotables: Every Vote Counts

Nov 10 2008
Instructions
vote button

Since the founding of the U.S., writers and speakers have stressed individual agency and the importance of the vote, holding voting up as both a right and a responsibility. In politics and rhetoric, being able to vote defines citizenship—and exercising that right is the duty of all citizens. Match the quotations on voting rights with the appropriate speakers.


  1. "This Government is menaced with great danger, and that danger cannot be averted by the triumph of the party of protection, nor by that of free trade, nor by the triumph of single tax or of free silver. That danger lies in the votes possessed by the males in the slums of the cities, and the ignorant foreign vote which was sought to be bought up by each party, to make political success."
    A.

    Susan B. Anthony

    B.

    William Jennings Bryan

    C.

    Frederick Douglass

    D.

    Carrie Chapman Catt

    E.

    Abraham Lincoln


  2. "Nothing strengthens the judgment and quickens the conscience like individual responsibility. Nothing adds such dignity to character as the recognition of one’s self-sovereignty; the right to an equal place, everywhere conceded —a place earned by personal merit, not an artificial attainment by inheritance, wealth, family and position."
    A.

    Woodrow Wilson

    B.

    Elizabeth Cady Stanton

    C.

    Frederick Douglass

    D.

    Booker T. Washington

    E.

    Jane Addams


  3. "I am not . . . in favor of making voters or jurors of negroes, nor of qualifying them . . . to intermarry with white people."
    A.

    Herbert Hoover

    B.

    Eleanor Roosevelt

    C.

    Booker T. Washington

    D.

    Sojourner Truth

    E.

    Abraham Lincoln


  4. "It is true that a strong plea for equal suffrage might be addressed to the national sense of honor."
    A.

    Ida B. Wells

    B.

    Emma Goldman

    C.

    Frederick Douglass

    D.

    John F. Kennedy

    E.

    Thomas Jefferson


  5. "The vote is the most powerful instrument ever devised by man for breaking down injustice and destroying the terrible walls which imprison men because they are different from other men."
    A.

    Lyndon B. Johnson

    B.

    Martin Luther King

    C.

    Washington Carver

    D.

    Anna Howard Shaw

    E.

    Alice Stone


  6. "Always vote for principle, though you may vote alone, and you may cherish the sweetest reflection that your vote is never lost."
    A.

    Woodrow Wilson

    B.

    Jesse Jackson

    C.

    John Quincy Adams

    D.

    George Washington

    E.

    Rosa Parks


  7. "Voting is the most precious right of every citizen, and we have a moral obligation to ensure the integrity of our voting process."
    A.

    Dwight D. Eisenhower

    B.

    Orval Faubus

    C.

    Alice Stone Blackwell

    D.

    Hillary Clinton

    E.

    Thurgood Marshall