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Spotlight on Elementary Education

In this Lesson Plan Review, students analyze primary and secondary sources describing an encounter between the Lewis and Clark expedition and a Native American tribe. The lesson overall is a great way to encourage students to work collaboratively to analyze this important historical interaction from multiple perspectives.

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Lesson Plan Reviews

Evaluate key elements of effective teaching Watch the INTRODUCTORY VIDEO
Evaluating the Validity of Information

Did the Chinese discover America before Columbus? How would or does this [...] »

Civil War Photos: What Do You See?

Analysis of photographs of Civil War artillery broadens students [...] »

English Language Learners

Instructional strategies and resources for ELL
Great Unsolved Mysteries in Canadian History
Great Unsolved Mysteries in Canadian History

Explore mysteries in Canadian history in both French and English.

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Historical Thinking Matters
Historical Thinking Matters

Primary sources in both English and Spanish on the Spanish American War, [...] »

Teaching Guides

Explore new teaching methods and approaches
Tramping Through History: Crafting Individual Field Trips

Go forth, and contextualize! Give students the opportunity for solo [...] »

Concept Formation

In order to understand topics, you must first understand concepts. Learn all [...] »

Document-Based Whole-Class Discussion

Classroom discussions need not be argumentative and unproductive. Discover a [...] »

Crop It

Use this four-step learning routine to deeply explore visual primary sources [...] »

Truth in Transit: Crafting Meaningful Field Trips

Leave your students with intellectually and emotionally significant memories [...] »

Ask a Master Teacher

Teaching with Lectures and Documents
Photo, students IV, May 1, 2007, Aaron TD, Flickr

Using a variety of instructional strategies in your classroom makes good [...] »