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West Virginia: 10th-Grade Standards

Tenth Grade: United States Studies to 1900

The tenth grade program of study examines the evolution of the Constitution as a living document and the role of participatory democracy in the development of a rapidly changing technological society. This study of the United States is an examination of the formative years from the Pre-Columbian civilizations to its transformation as a dominant political and economic influence in the world. Special emphasis is placed on how the challenges of settling expansive and diverse physical environments were met by a culturally diverse population. The West Virginia Standards for 21st Century Learning include the following components: 21st Century Content Standards and Objectives and 21st Century Learning Skills and Technology Tools. All West Virginia teachers are responsible for classroom instruction that integrates learning skills, technology tools and content standards and objectives.

Social Studies Standard 1: Citizenship

SS.S.10.01 / Students will:

  • characterize and model good citizenship by building social networks of reciprocity and trustworthiness (Civic Dispositions).
  • model a respect for symbols, ideas and concepts of the United States and analyze the roles of significant individuals
    (Respect For People, Events, and Symbols).
  • develop and employ the civic skills necessary for effective citizenship by using criteria to make judgments, arrive at and defend positions and evaluate the validity of the positions or data (Evaluation Skills).
  • develop the participatory skills of interacting, monitoring and influencing that are essential for informed, effective and responsible citizenship, including participation in civic life to shape public policy (Participatory Skills).
  • recognize and communicate the responsibilities, privileges and rights of United States citizens (Civic Life).
  • SS.PD.10.1 / Performance Descriptors

    • Novice:
      • examine government actions and identify citizen influences and responses;
      • identify citizen rights and responsibilities and their importance, examine situations when they are in conflict and select reasons for peaceful conflict resolution;
      • discuss positions on naturalization and identify sources on public policy issues; and conflict, and defend peaceful conflict resolution;
      • compare/contrast positions on naturalization and sources on public policy issues; and
      • select and participate in a volunteer service project.
    • Partial Mastery:
      • list government actions and explain how citizens can influence and respond ;
      • list citizen rights and responsibilities, discuss their importance, identify situations when they are in conflict, and defend peaceful conflict resolution;
      • compare/contrast positions on naturalization and sources on public policy issues; and
      • select and participate in a volunteer service project.
    • Mastery:
      • debate government actions and compare/contrast citizen influences and responses;
      • summarize citizen rights and responsibilities, appraise their importance, defend positions when they are in conflict, and evaluate peaceful conflict resolution;
      • evaluate positions on naturalization and sources of information on public policy issues; and
      • participate in a volunteer service project and provide rationale.
    • Above Mastery:
      • research and debate government actions and evaluate citizen influences and responses;
      • compare/contrast citizen rights and responsibilities, defend their importance, justify positions when they are in conflict, and evaluate peaceful conflict resolution;
      • debate positions on naturalization and the validity of sources of information on public policy issues; and
      • research various volunteer service projects, participate in one, and provide rationale for participation.
    • Distinguished:
      • research and debate potential government actions and anticipate citizen responses
      • research citizen rights and responsibilities, debate their importance, create new positions when existing ideas are in conflict, and hypothesize peaceful conflict resolution;
      • prioritize positions on naturalization and justify the validity of sources of information on public policy issues; and
      • research a community need, organize and lead a volunteer service project to provide help for the need.
  • Objectives / Students will:

    • SS.O.10.01.01: compare and contrast various citizens’ responses to controversial government actions and debate decisions as to what the government should and should not do.
    • SS.O.10.01.02: appraise the importance of the fundamental democratic values and principles of the United States constitutional democracy upon individuals, communities and nations.
    • SS.O.10.01.03: explain how the interactions of citizens with one another help monitor and influence government. policy.
    • SS.O.10.01.04: evaluate ways conflicts can be resolved in a cooperative, peaceful manner which respects individual rights and promotes the common good.
    • SS.O.10.01.05: evaluate, take and defend positions on issues in which fundamental democratic values and principles are in conflict (e.g., liberty and equality, individual rights and the common good, majority rule, minority rights).
    • SS.O.10.01.06: summarize the characteristics of United States citizenship and evaluate responsibilities, duties, privileges and rights of United States citizens.
    • SS.O.10.01.07: evaluate, take and defend positions on issues regarding the criteria used for naturalization.
    • SS.O.10.01.08: evaluate sources of information related to public policy issues.
    • SS.O.10.01.09: examine, select and participate in a volunteer service or project and explain the reason for your selection.

Social Studies Standard 2: Civics/Government

SS.S.10.02 / Students will:

  • examine and analyze the purpose and basic principles of the United States government (Purposes of Government).
  • outline and evaluate and analyze the origins and meanings of the principles, ideals, and core democratic values expressed in
    the foundational documents of the United States (Ideals of United States Democracy).
  • examine and distinguish the structure, function, and responsibilities of governments and the allocation of power at the local, state and national levels (United States Government and Politics).
  • analyze how the world is organized politically and compare the role and relationship of the United States to other nations and to world affairs (United States Government and World Affairs).
  • SS.PD.10.2 / Performance Descriptors

    • Novice:
      • use paraphrases or summaries of primary sources to identify some key principles and philosophies in core documents and relate them to major events;
      • recognize the basic elements of a federalist system and the American Constitution.;
      • connect key democratic ideals to public behaviors; and
      • name some ways the American Revolution and George Washington’s farewell address influenced people/ nations.
    • Partial Mastery:
      • use basic primary sources to identify key principles and philosophies in core documents and relate them to major periods and events;
      • describe the basic elements of a federalist system and the American Constitution;
      • analyze democratic ideals that are reflected in public behaviors; and
      • draw conclusions about the influence of the American Revolution and George Washington’s farewell address.
    • Mastery:
      • use primary sources to identify and describe principles and compare philosophies found in core documents and relate them to historical periods and events;
      • analyze government powers in a federalist system and the American Constitution;
      • evaluate how democratic ideals are reflected in public behaviors; and
      • evaluate the influence of the American Revolution and George Washington’s farewell address.
    • Above Mastery:
      • analyze primary sources to explain and compare principles and philosophies found in core documents and draw conclusions about their influence on historical periods and events;
      • compare the powers in a federalist and an anti- federalist system and the American Constitution; and
      • differentiate how democratic and non-democratic ideals are reflected in public behaviors.; and
      • debate the influence of the American Revolution and George Washington’s farewell address.
    • Distinguished:
      • analyze sophisticated primary sources to evaluate and compare principles and philosophies found in core documents and evaluate their influence on historical periods and events;
      • debate and defend the distribution of power in a federalist system and the American Constitution;
      • research and debate how democratic and non- democratic ideals are reflected in public behaviors; and
      • investigate positive and negative influences of the American Revolution and George Washington’s farewell address on the international perceptions of the United States and summarize results
  • Objectives / Students will:

    • SS.O.10.02.01 identify and describe the fundamental democratic principles and values in the nation’s core American documents, relate them to the subsequent periods in U.S. history, and identify the discrepancies between the expressed ideals and realities.
    • SS.O.10.02.02: identify fundamental American democratic principles using primary sources and significant political speeches and writings.
    • SS.O.10.02.03: explain the purpose of the United States government and analyze how its powers are acquired, used and justified.
    • SS.O.10.02.04: compare and contrast documents and philosophies that are the basis for representative democracy in the United States (e.g., Greek, Roman, John Locke, Magna Carta, English Bill of Rights).)
    • SS.O.10.02.05: explain the purpose, organization and functions of the legislative, executive and judicial branches, and analyze the separation of powers, checks and balances.
    • SS.O.10.02.06: summarize the U.S. Constitution and Amendments then justify the steps required to amend the United States Constitution.
    • SS.O.10.02.07: analyze the presidential election process, the continued use of the Electoral College and the order of presidential succession.
    • SS.O.10.02.08: evaluate federalism and give examples of shared, delegated, reserved and implied powers.
    • SS.O.10.02.09: evaluate the degree to which public policies and citizen behaviors reflect or foster the stated ideals of a democratic republican form of government.
    • SS.O.10.02.10: evaluate, take and defend positions about the functions of political leadership and the importance of public service in American democracy.
    • SS.O.10.02.11: evaluate and defend how the American Revolution and the establishment of the United States as a constitutional democracy influenced people in other nations and reshaped their image of America.
    • SS.O.10.02.12: assess the significance of George Washington’s farewell address.

Social Studies Standard 3: Economics

SS.S.10.03 / Students will:

  • analyze the role of economic choices in scarcity, supply and demand, resource allocation, decision-making, voluntary exchange and trade-offs (Choices).
  • research, critique and evaluate the roles of private and public institutions in the economy (Institutions).
  • compare and contrast various economic systems and analyze their impact on individual citizens (Economic Systems).
  • illustrate how the factors of production impact the United States economic system (Factors of Production).
  • analyze the elements of competition and how they impact the economy (Competition).
  • examine and evaluate the interdependence of global economies (Global Economies).
  • SS.PD.10.3 / Performance Descriptors

    • Novice:
      • identify effects of the American Revolution and other factors in the development of the U. S. economic system.
      • list key points in the creation and operation of U.S. fiscal policy.
      • define the various economic systems; and
      • list the key issues in the Hamilton-Jefferson debate.
    • Partial Mastery:
      • discuss the effect of the American Revolution and explain other factors that led to the development of the U. S. economic system;
      • explain the creation and operation of U.S. fiscal policy;
      • identify key aspects of various economic systems; and
      • analyze the causes/ effects of the Hamilton-Jefferson debate.
    • Mastery:
      • explain the effect of the American Revolution and analyze other factors that led to the development of the U. S. economic system;
      • analyze the creation and operation U.S. fiscal policy;
      • explain the various economic systems; and
      • evaluate the causes/ effects of the Hamilton-Jefferson debate.
    • Above Mastery:
      • analyze the effects of the American Revolution and assess other factors that led to the development of the U. S. economic system;
      • debate key issues in the creation and operation of U.S. fiscal policy;
      • compare and contrast various economic systems; and
      • summarize the causes/ effects of the Hamilton-Jefferson debate and explain the outcome.
    • Distinguished:
      • evaluate the effects of the American Revolution and other factors that led to the development of the U. S. economic system and critique their interaction;
      • hypothesize how changes in the creation and operation of U.S. fiscal policy would affect the country;
      • analyze how different economic systems have affected international relations; and
      • evaluate the outcome of the Hamilton-Jefferson debate and its influence on today’s economy.
  • Objectives / Students will:

    • SS.O.10.03.01: determine the relationship between the law of supply/demand and production/consumption.
    • SS.O.10.03.02: recognize and discuss the effects of the American Revolution on economic development and construct the steps involved in the change of the United States economic system from mercantilism to free enterprise capitalism.
    • SS.O.10.03.03: differentiate between various types of taxes and relate them to taxation controversies in the United States during their era.
    • SS.O.10.03.04: critique the cause and effect relationship between the labor movement and industrialization in the United States.
    • SS.O.12.03.05: explain the concept of capitalism and compare the basic components to those of socialism and communism.
    • SS.O.12.03.06: identify and analyze the role of market factors in the settlement of the United States and the development of the free enterprise system.
    • SS.O.12.03.07: analyze the effects of foreign trade and tariff policies on the United States.
    • SS.O.10.03.08: explain and judge the ideas, values, and practices that caused the Hamilton-Jefferson debate, and evaluate the effects of the debate on the formation and direction of the nation’s economy.

Social Studies Standard 4: Geography

SS.S.10.04 / Students will:

  • interpret, and choose maps, globes and other geographic tools to categorize and organize information about personal
    directions, people, places and environments (The World in Spatial Terms).
  • examine the physical and human characteristics of place and explain how the lives of people are rooted in places and regions (Places and Regions).
  • analyze the physical processes that shape the earth’s surface and create, sustain and modify the cultural and natural environment (Physical Systems).
  • analyze and illustrate how the earth is shaped by the movement of people and their activities (Human Systems).
  • analyze the interaction of society with the environment (Environment and Society).
  • point out geographic perspective and tools and assess techniques available for geographic study (Uses of Geography).
  • SS.PD.10.4 / Performance Descriptors

    • Novice:
      • use basic geographic tools and vocabulary to identify spatial information;
      • examine the effects of geographic features on settlement, movement, and economic development;
      • list some effects of diverse cultural characteristics on the development of American cultural;
      • identify some of the effects of interaction between humans and the environment.
    • Partial Mastery:
      • use basic geographic tools and vocabulary to explain spatial information;
      • give examples of the effects of geographic features on settlement, movement, and economic development;
      • compare/contrast the effects of diverse cultural characteristics on the development of American culture; and
      • examine the effects of interaction between humans and the environment.
    • Mastery:
      • apply geographic tools and vocabulary to analyze and illustrate spatial information;
      • assess the effects of geographic features on settlement, movement, and economic development;
      • analyze the effects of diverse cultural characteristics on the development of American culture; and
      • analyze the effects of interaction between humans and the environment.
    • Above Mastery:
      • apply advanced geographic tools and vocabulary analyze and explain spatial information.
      • construct models to show the effects of geographic features on settlement, movement, and economic development;
      • evaluate the effects of diverse cultural characteristics on the development of American culture; and
      • categorize the effects of interaction between humans and the environment.
    • Distinguished:
      • select and apply advanced geographic tools and vocabulary to interpret spatial information;
      • collect data and predict effects of geographic features on settlement, movement, and economic development;
      • research and debate the effects of diverse cultural characteristics on the development of American culture and ; and
      • debate the positive/negative effects of interaction between humans and the environment.
  • Objectives / Students will:

    • SS.O.10.04.01: apply correct vocabulary and geographic tools to determine and illustrate:
      • major meridians of longitude and parallels of latitude.
      • landforms
      • bodies of water
      • states and their capitals
      • cities
      • climatic regions
      • relative and exact location of selected designations
    • SS.O.10.04.02: analyze the role of mental maps in the movement of people across the United States.
    • SS.O.10.04.03: evaluate the effects of population growth on urbanization.
    • SS.O.10.04.04: determine the most appropriate maps and graphics in an atlas to examine and assess geographic issues regarding the growth and development of the United States (e.g., topography, transportation routes, settlement patterns, growth of service centers and cities).
    • SS.O.10.04.05: interpret how people express attachment to places and regions (e.g., by reference to essays, novels, poems, short stories, feature films, traditional musical compositions such as “God Bless America” and “America the Beautiful”).
    • SS.O.10.04.06: evaluate the impact of health and cultural considerations on the quality of life over different historical time periods. (e.g., Jamestown, Plymouth, Gold Rush, Smallpox, urbanization, epidemics))
    • SS.O.10.04.07: Analyze the characteristics, traits, religions, traditions and contributions of Native Americans, African Americans, Hispanics and all immigrants such as Germans, Italians, and Irish to the new American culture.
    • SS.O.10.04.08: evaluate the geographic differences that contributed to economic development and regionalism prior to the Civil War.
    • SS.O.10.04.09: analyze the impact of the environment, including the location of natural resources, on immigration and settlement patterns.
    • SS.O.10.04.10: compare and contrast the socioeconomic changes that occur in regions that experience population change.
    • SS.O.10.04.11: evaluate the human impact on the environment throughout the American experience.
    • SS.O.10.04.12: analyze the ways in which physical and human factors have influenced the evolution of significant historic events and movements.

Social Studies Standard 5: History

SS.S.K.05 / Students will:

  • organize, analyze and compare historical events, distinguish cause-effect relationships, theorize alternative actions and outcomes, and anticipate future application (Chronology).
  • use the processes and resources of historical inquiry to develop appropriate questions, gather and examine evidence, compare, analyze and interpret historical data (Skills and Application).
  • examine, analyze and synthesize historical knowledge of major events, individuals, cultures and the humanities in West Virginia, the United States, and the world (Culture and Humanities).
  • use historical knowledge to analyze local, state, national and global interdependence (Interpretation and Evaluation).
  • examine political institutions and theories that have developed and changed over time; and research and cite reasons for development and change (Political Institutions).
  • SS.PD.K.5 / Performance Descriptors

    • Novice:
      • recognize the significance of key people, places, groups, documents, and events on U.S. history;
      • describe the creation of the federal government and identify the key components of its operation;
      • trace events contributing to expansion, sectionalism, conflict, and international involvement; and
      • demonstrate limited skills in discussion, debate, and persuasive writing.
    • Partial Mastery:
      • identify and summarize the accomplishments or significance of key people, places, groups, documents and events;
      • describe the creation of the federal government, give examples of its functions, and make connections to social, economic, and political changes;
      • summarize examples of expansion, sectionalism, conflict, and international involvement; and
      • demonstrate basic skills in discussion, debate, and persuasive writing.
    • Mastery:
      • analyze key people, places, groups, documents, and events and judge their impacts on historical interpretation;
      • explain the creation and operation of the federal government and assess how the government has impacted social, economic, and political changes;
      • analyze the causes/effects of exploration, colonization, expansion, sectionalism, conflict, technology, civil rights, and international involvement; and
      • demonstrate proficient skills in discussion, debate, and persuasive writing.
    • Above Mastery:
      • critique the contributions or significance of key people, places, groups, documents and events and propose connections to contemporary and/or future events;
      • research alternative systems of government, comparing how each has impacted social, economic, and political change;
      • formulate reasons for expansion, sectionalism, conflict, and international involvement and investigate other courses of action; and
      • demonstrate advanced skills in discussion, debate, and persuasive writing.
    • Distinguished:
      • evaluate and debate the historical impact of key people, places, groups, documents, and events;
      • validate the bases of government policies, devise alternative actions, and predict outcomes;
      • critique reasons for and effects of expansion, sectionalism, conflict, and international involvement; and
      • choose best resources to provide justification and exceptional skills in discussion, debate, and persuasive writing.
  • Objectives / Students will:

    • SS.O.10.05.01: relate life in America before the 17th century to life today.
    • SS.O.10.05.02: analyze and explain the contacts that occurred between Native Americans and European settlers during the age of discovery.
    • SS.O.10.05.03: trace the roots and evaluate early explorations of America and describe and analyze the attraction of the New World to Europeans (religious, social, political, economic).
    • SS.O.10.05.04: justify how the effects of European empire building led to the American Revolution
    • SS.O.10.05.05: prioritize the problems that existed between the British government and the American colonies and defend first the American viewpoint and then the British viewpoint (e.g., sovereignty of Parliament, taxation, trade restrictions).
    • SS.O.10.05.06: describe and analyze the content of the Declaration of Independence and explain the factors and events which led to its creation.
    • SS.O.10.05.07: analyze, explain and sequence major events and ideas of the Revolutionary War.
    • SS.O.10.05.08: analyze and evaluate the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights; describe and measure the challenges faced by the new United States government.
    • SS.O.10.05.09: differentiate then summarize the parts of the Constitution that responded to the political, economic and social conditions that existed after the American Revolution.
    • SS.O.10.05.10: explain the major challenges faced by the framers of the Constitution, and describe the compromises reached at the Constitutional Convention.
    • SS.O.10.05.11: evaluate the effects of nationalism on the constitutional, political, economic and foreign policy issues faced by the United States in its formative years. (e.g., Monroe Doctrine, Manifest Destiny, Washington’s Farewell Address, War of 1812)
    • SS.O.10.05.12: identify and explain the impact of United States Supreme Court decisions (e.g., Marbury v. Madison, McCollough v. Maryland, Dred Scott, Plessy v. Ferguson).
    • SS.O.10.05.13: identify and explain the factors that led to exploration, settlement and expansion across the United States and analyze how the expansion changed the United States (e.g., Louisiana Purchase, Lewis and Clark Exploration, Erie Canal, Missouri Compromise)
    • SS.O.10.05.14: assess the effects of United States policies on Native Americans and recommend alternative actions.
    • SS.O.10.05.15: research the institution of slavery and its effect on the political, economic and social development of the United States and summarize their findings.
    • SS.O.10.05.16: compare and contrast the political, economic and social conditions in the United States before and after the Civil War.
    • SS.O.10.05.18: outline the effects of technological change on the United States (e.g., agriculture, transportation, industry, labor, society).
    • SS.O.10.05.19: critique the goals and actions of reformers and reform movements (e.g., women’s rights, minorities, temperance, prison, hospitals, schools, religion) and assume the role of reformer to explain the goals and actions or the movement.
    • SS.O.10.05.20: debate the influence and impact of diverse cultures on United States society and explain the process of their assimilation into American life.
    • SS.O.10.05.21: explain the development of representative democracy in the United States.
    • SS.O.10.05.22: research, analyze and interpret primary sources (e.g., artifacts, diaries, letters, photographs, art, documents, newspapers, major political debates) and compare to contemporary media (e.g., television, movies, computer information systems) to better understand events and life in the United States to 1900.
    • SS.O.10.05.23: construct various timelines of American history from pre-Columbian times to 1900 highlighting landmark dates, events, technological changes, major political and military events and major historical figures and connect these to the political, economic and social movements the periods.
    • SS.O.10.05.24: develop skills in discussion, debate and persuasive writing by analyzing historical situations and events to 1900.
    • SS.O.10.05.25: analyze and explain the positions of the political parties and their leaders then choose and support a position on the following:
      • economic development
      • territorial expansion
      • political participation
      • individual rights
      • states’ rights
      • slavery
      • social reforms.
    • SS.O.10.05.26: examine the leaders, ideas and events behind the Monroe Doctrine, Manifest Destiny and other movements (i.e., revolutionary movements in the Caribbean and Latin America) and explain the effects of these movements on the United States.

Social Studies Standard 6: Reading

SS.S.10.06 / Students will:

  • use the dimensions of reading (phonemic awareness, phonics, background knowledge/vocabulary, high frequency word/fluency, comprehension, and writing) in their acquisition of social studies knowledge, insuring a foundation of college readiness in this genre.
  • recognize main ideas and supporting details to locate basic facts (e.g. names, dates, events).
  • distinguish relationships among people, ideas, and events.
  • recognize cause-effect relationships in content passages.
  • outline sequences of events
  • summarize events and ideas.
  • Infer main idea or purpose of content.
  • draw generalizations and conclusions about people, ideas and events.
  • write and edit organized texts of various genres to insure that information is clearly understood.
 
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