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Utah: 12th-Grade Standards

  • UT.1. Standard: U.S. History II

    Students will expand their knowledge of pre-Reconstruction America.

    • 1.1. Objective:

      Examine the American colonial experience.

      • 1.1.a. Indicator:

        Identify reasons for the establishment of colonies in America.

      • 1.1.b. Indicator:

        Examine the rise of American culture in the New England, Middle, and Southern colonies.

    • 1.2. Objective:

      Investigate the development of the United States government, its institutions, and its politics.

      • 1.2.a. Indicator:

        Identify the philosophies which influenced the development of the Constitution, separation of powers, balance of power, and the elastic clause.

      • 1.2.b. Indicator:

        Analyze the Constitution's creation and impact on the new United States.

      • 1.2.c. Indicator:

        Trace the development of American government and politics from the Federalist period through Jacksonian democracy.

    • 1.3. Objective:

      Analyze the growth and division of the United States from 1820 through 1877.

      • 1.3.a. Indicator:

        Trace the United States' expansion and growth from the Atlantic to the Pacific.

      • 1.3.b. Indicator:

        Recognize the sectional differences that developed during the antebellum period.

      • 1.3.c. Indicator:

        Evaluate the causes, course, and consequences of the Civil War.

      • 1.3.d. Indicator:

        Analyze the successes and failures of the Reconstruction period following the Civil War.

      • 1.3.e. Indicator:

        Examine the United States' policies relating to American Indians.

  • UT.2. Standard: U.S. History II

    Students will understand how the growth of industry changed the United States.

    • 2.1. Objective:

      Assess how transportation, communication, and marketing improvements and innovations transformed the American economy in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

      • 2.1.a. Indicator:

        Identify major American inventions and how they affected the United States; e.g., telephone, electricity, car, motion pictures.

      • 2.1.b. Indicator:

        Explain the expansion of transportation and communication in the United States following the Civil War.

      • 2.1.c. Indicator:

        Determine the impact of industrialization on the American economy and society.

      • 2.1.d. Indicator:

        Examine how the market revolution affected retail distribution of goods in the cities and in rural areas.

    • 2.2. Objective:

      Evaluate the prominent business leaders and the business organizations that influenced the growth of industrialization in the United States.

      • 2.2.a. Indicator:

        Examine the roles of American industrialists; e.g., Rockefeller, Morgan, Carnegie, Vanderbilt, Ford.

      • 2.2.b. Indicator:

        Evaluate the growth and influences of monopolies and trusts on capitalism.

    • 2.3. Objective:

      Assess how the growth of industry affected the movement of people into and within the United States.

      • 2.3.a. Indicator:

        Determine the demographic changes in population from the 1890's to the present.

      • 2.3.b. Indicator:

        Investigate the influences that affected various immigrant groups entering the United States.

      • 2.3.c. Indicator:

        Examine the working conditions of immigrant workers; e.g., factory, mine, agriculture, transportation.

    • 2.4. Objective:

      Investigate the challenges presented to urban inhabitants.

      • 2.4.a. Indicator:

        Identify how American cities spawned American architecture.

      • 2.4.b. Indicator:

        Examine living conditions in tenements.

      • 2.4.c. Indicator:

        Compare the attitudes of Social Darwinism with those of Social Gospel believers.

  • UT.3. Standard: U.S. History II

    Students will recognize how social reform occurred at the turn of the century.

    • 3.1. Objective:

      Investigate reform movements and their prominent leaders.

      • 3.1.a. Indicator:

        Examine the problems faced by American farmers created by the new market economy and the rise of the Populist Party.

      • 3.1.b. Indicator:

        Analyze the growth and influence of political machines; i.e., muckrakers, Progressives.

      • 3.1.c. Indicator:

        Investigate the emerging civil rights movements for women and Afro-Americans.

    • 3.2. Objective:

      Assess the growth and development of labor unions and their key leaders.

      • 3.2.a. Indicator:

        Trace the development of national labor unions.

      • 3.2.b. Indicator:

        Determine the impact of collective bargaining.

      • 3.2.c. Indicator:

        Analyze the development of socialism in the United States.

  • UT.4. Standard: U.S. History II

    Students will understand how war affected the early 20th century.

    • 4.1. Objective:

      Investigate how the United States became involved in imperialism and the Spanish-American War.

      • 4.1.a. Indicator:

        Determine the economic, social, and military affects of United States imperialism.

      • 4.1.b. Indicator:

        Examine the cause, course, and consequences of the Spanish-American War.

      • 4.1.c. Indicator:

        Assess how America's imperialism altered relationships with the Far East and Latin America.

    • 4.2. Objective:

      Examine how World War I affected the military and the home front of the United States.

      • 4.2.a. Indicator:

        Identify major causes of World War I and the United States' involvement and influence in the war; i.e., Wilson's fourteen points, the Versailles Treaty.

      • 4.2.b. Indicator:

        Determine the reasons the United States Senate refused to join the League of Nations.

      • 4.2.c. Indicator:

        Examine the impact World War I had on the United States; e.g., government policy, industrial might, civil liberties.

  • UT.5. Standard: U.S. History II

    Students will understand how Americans reacted to rapid social change during the 1920's.

    • 5.1. Objective:

      Analyze how the United States coped with rapid economic and technological advances.

      • 5.1.a. Indicator:

        Investigate how mass media affected American society.

      • 5.1.b. Indicator:

        Assess how new inventions and consumerism influenced daily life.

      • 5.1.c. Indicator:

        Explain how the automobile affected the business and landscape of America.

    • 5.2. Objective:

      Examine the experiences of black Americans and women in the early 20th century.

      • 5.2.a. Indicator:

        Account for the sudden growth of black consciousness.

      • 5.2.b. Indicator:

        Describe the changes in women's attitudes and roles in society.

  • UT.6. Standard: U.S. History II

    Students will understand how the Great Depression and the New Deal affected the United States.

    • 6.1. Objective:

      Investigate the impact of the Great Depression on the United States.

      • 6.1.a. Indicator:

        Analyze the major causes of the Great Depression.

      • 6.1.b. Indicator:

        Examine the social effects of the Great Depression.

    • 6.2. Objective:

      Analyze the long-term effects of the New Deal on the United States.

      • 6.2.a. Indicator:

        Explore the purposes and effectiveness of the New Deal; e.g., presidency, economics, politics.

      • 6.2.b. Indicator:

        Investigate the shift of power from state to federal government.

  • UT.7. Standard: U.S. History II

    Students will understand the causes, course, and consequences of the United States' role in World War II.

    • 7.1. Objective:

      Determine how America shifted from isolationism to intervention.

      • 7.1.a. Indicator:

        Analyze the factors that led to militarism and fascist aggression in the world.

      • 7.1.b. Indicator:

        Determine how the attack on Pearl Harbor forced the United States out of isolationism.

      • 7.1.c. Indicator:

        Examine how the alliance systems led the United States into World War II.

      • 7.1.d. Indicator:

        Investigate the major campaigns of the United States in the European and Pacific theaters; e.g., Midway, D-Day, Battle of the Bulge, island hopping, and the bombing of Japan.

    • 7.2. Objective:

      Examine the impact World War II had on the American home front.

      • 7.2.a. Indicator:

        Identify the impact of World War II on minority groups in America.

      • 7.2.b. Indicator:

        Examine the role women played in the wartime workforce.

      • 7.2.c. Indicator:

        Trace American mobilization for war.

    • 7.3. Objective:

      Evaluate how the rules and weapons of war changed during World War II.

      • 7.3.a. Indicator:

        Assess how the war expanded beyond military targets to civilian centers.

      • 7.3.b. Indicator:

        Evaluate how technology changed the weapons used in World War II and introduced the atomic age.

    • 7.4. Objective:

      Investigate the Post-War Baby Boom's influence on America.

      • 7.4.a. Indicator:

        Assess the influence of the G.I. Bill on the American lifestyle.

      • 7.4.b. Indicator:

        Trace the development of consumerism and the economy on the Baby Boom generation.

      • 7.4.c. Indicator:

        Trace the development of television and its impact on American culture.

      • 7.4.d. Indicator:

        Investigate the cultural and social impact of the Baby Boom generation on the American people.

  • UT.8. Standard: U.S. History II

    Students will understand the United States' domestic and international position in the Cold War era.

    • 8.1. Objective:

      Investigate how the postwar goals and action of the United States and the Soviet Union was manifested throughout the world.

      • 8.1.a. Indicator:

        Analyze the organization and operation of the United Nations.

      • 8.1.b. Indicator:

        Evaluate the effectiveness of American post-war foreign policy in Europe and the Soviet Union's reaction.

      • 8.1.c. Indicator:

        Examine the world's reaction to nuclear weapons.

    • 8.2. Objective:

      Analyze the Cold War ideology of the United States' involvement in Asia.

      • 8.2.a. Indicator:

        Explain America's reaction to the fall of China to Communism under Mao Zedong.

      • 8.2.b. Indicator:

        Trace American and United Nations involvement in the Korean Police Action.

      • 8.2.c. Indicator:

        Examine the various factors that drew the United States into conflict with North Vietnam and Ho Chi Minh.

      • 8.2.d. Indicator:

        Investigate how the Vietnam War changed the nature of warfare.

    • 8.3. Objective:

      Summarize the political, social, and economic reactions to the Cold War in the United States.

      • 8.3.a. Indicator:

        Examine the successes and failures of the various political administrations; i.e., Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, Nixon.

      • 8.3.b. Indicator:

        Analyze the Great Society programs aimed at ending poverty.

      • 8.3.c. Indicator:

        Examine the impact of McCarthyism and Watergate on citizens' attitude toward government.

      • 8.3.d. Indicator:

        Trace the development of space exploration.

    • 8.4. Objective:

      Investigate the end of the Cold War and examine America's role in the changing world.

      • 8.4.a. Indicator:

        Compare differing American reactions to overseas military involvement.

      • 8.4.b. Indicator:

        Trace the events that resulted in the breakup of the USSR.

      • 8.4.c. Indicator:

        Examine the superpower status of the United States in the world.

  • UT.9. Standard: U.S. History II

    The students will understand the emergence and development of the human rights and culture in the modern era.

    • 9.1. Objective:

      Analyze how the civil rights movement affected United States society.

      • 9.1.a. Indicator:

        Identify the causes and consequences of civil rights legislation and court decisions.

      • 9.1.b. Indicator:

        Investigate the fight for political, economic, and social equality of women.

      • 9.1.c. Indicator:

        Analyze how the black civil rights movement utilized both social and political actions to achieve its goals.

      • 9.1.d. Indicator:

        Investigate the gains in civil rights made by the American Indian nations, Mexican Americans, and other ethnic groups in the last half of the twentieth century.

    • 9.2. Objective:

      Analyze the impact of the counter culture since the 1960's.

      • 9.2.a. Indicator:

        Trace the development of the counter culture from the anti-Vietnam movement.

      • 9.2.b. Indicator:

        Assess the development of mass media as the voice of the counter culture.

      • 9.2.c. Indicator:

        Examine the impact of drugs on the counter culture and the United States.

  • UT.10. Standard: U.S. History II

    The students will understand the economic and political changes of contemporary America.

    • 10.1. Objective:

      Analyze the economy of the contemporary United States.

      • 10.1.a. Indicator:

        Examine the effects of economics on modern society.

      • 10.1.b. Indicator:

        Trace the development of computers and the Internet and their impact on American business and globalization.

    • 10.2. Objective:

      Determine how politics was changed by the end of the Cold War.

      • 10.2.a. Indicator:

        Examine the 'Reagan Revolution,' its goals, success, and failures.

      • 10.2.b. Indicator:

        Determine the impact of environmentalism on the United States.

      • 10.2.c. Indicator:

        Analyze the impact of international terrorism on the United States.

  • UT.1. Standard: Geography for Life

    Students will understand the world in spatial terms.

    • 1.1. Objective:

      Use maps and other geographic tools to acquire information from a spatial perspective.

      • 1.1.a. Indicator:

        Explain the differences between major types of map projections.

      • 1.1.b. Indicator:

        Examine characteristics of maps and globes such as latitude, longitude, great circle routes, cardinal directions, compass rose, legend, scale, relief, grid system, and time zones.

      • 1.1.c. Indicator:

        Explain selected map concepts, including rotation, revolution, axis, seasons, solstice, equinox, and the earth/sun relationship of weather patterns.

      • 1.1.d. Indicator:

        Collect and interpret geographic data using maps, charts, population pyramids, cartograms, remote sensing, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

    • 1.2. Objective:

      Explore the concept of mental maps to organize information about people, places, and environments.

      • 1.2.a. Indicator:

        Define mental mapping.

      • 1.2.b. Indicator:

        Appraise mental maps, from simple to complex.

    • 1.3. Objective:

      Analyze the spatial organization of people, places, and environments on the earth's surface.

      • 1.3.a. Indicator:

        Describe the importance and role of location in geographic studies.

      • 1.3.b. Indicator:

        Apply the geographic mode of inquiry (What? Where? How? And So What?) to world regions.

      • 1.3.c. Indicator:

        Evaluate the locational importance of human and natural resources using maps, satellite images, and databases.

      • 1.3.d. Indicator:

        Define absolute and relative location recognizing political and physical boundaries.

  • UT.2. Standard: Geography for Life

    Students will understand the human and physical characteristics of places and regions.

    • 2.1. Objective:

      Interpret place by its human and physical characteristics.

      • 2.1.a. Indicator:

        Examine human characteristics, including language, religion, population, political and economic systems, and quality of life.

      • 2.1.b. Indicator:

        Investigate physical characteristics such as landforms, climates, water cycle, vegetation, and animal life.

      • 2.1.c. Indicator:

        Recognize that places change over time.

    • 2.2. Objective:

      Assess how people create regions to interpret the earth's surface.

      • 2.2.a. Indicator:

        Recognize how peoples create regions to understand a large, complex, and changing world.

      • 2.2.b. Indicator:

        Characterize the similarities and differences within and between regions.

    • 2.3. Objective:

      Evaluate how culture and experience influence the way people live in places and regions.

      • 2.3.a. Indicator:

        List and define components of culture; e.g., race, gender roles, education, religion.

      • 2.3.b. Indicator:

        Explain the effects of cultural diffusion from country to country.

  • UT.3. Standard: Geography for Life

    Students will understand how physical processes shape the earth's surface.

    • 3.1. Objective:

      Examine the physical processes that shape the earth's surface.

      • 3.1.a. Indicator:

        Examine the role of plate tectonics in shaping the earth's surface.

      • 3.1.b. Indicator:

        Assess the external forces of weathering and erosion.

      • 3.1.c. Indicator:

        Explain the factors that combine to shape climatic and vegetation patterns on earth.

    • 3.2. Objective:

      Assess the characteristics and location of ecosystems.

      • 3.2.a. Indicator:

        Identify the characteristics of ecosystems.

      • 3.2.b. Indicator:

        Use geographic tools to identify the location and distribution of global ecosystems.

      • 3.2.c. Indicator:

        Compare regions of the earth with similar physical features, such as semi-arid regions in Utah with other semiarid regions of the world.

  • UT.4. Standard: Geography for Life

    Students will understand how human activities shape the earth's surface.

    • 4.1. Objective:

      Analyze the characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations on the earth's surface.

      • 4.1.a. Indicator:

        Describe how physical environments provide geographic advantage or disadvantage.

      • 4.1.b. Indicator:

        Examine the importance of water to settlement patterns.

      • 4.1.c. Indicator:

        Explain why people who modify their physical environment in one place cause change in other places.

      • 4.1.d. Indicator:

        Investigate how people adapt to their environment.

    • 4.2. Objective:

      Analyze economic interdependence among regions and countries.

      • 4.2.a. Indicator:

        Examine economic networks, from local to global.

      • 4.2.b. Indicator:

        Assess how nations and cultures are linked through transportation, communication, language, currency, goods, and services.

    • 4.3. Objective:

      Investigate various forms of governance and how they affect peoples and landscapes.

      • 4.3.a. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast political systems within world regions.

      • 4.3.b. Indicator:

        Determine the role of government in contemporary and historical world issues.

  • UT.5. Standard: Geography for Life

    Students will understand the interaction of physical and human systems.

    • 5.1. Objective:

      Explore how humans change the environment and how the environment changes humans.

      • 5.1.a. Indicator:

        Evaluate the role of technology in modifying the physical environment.

      • 5.1.b. Indicator:

        Explain how historical events affect physical and human systems.

      • 5.1.c. Indicator:

        Discuss regional issues; e.g., desertification, deforestation, pollution.

      • 5.1.d. Indicator:

        Predict the potential effect of human modification on the physical environment.

    • 5.2. Objective:

      Assess the importance of natural and human resources.

      • 5.2.a. Indicator:

        Describe the roles of natural and human resources in daily life.

      • 5.2.b. Indicator:

        Identify worldwide distribution and use of human and natural resources.

      • 5.2.c. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast the use of renewable and nonrenewable resources.

      • 5.2.d. Indicator:

        Evaluate the role of energy resources as they are consumed, conserved, and recycled.

  • UT.6. Standard: Geography for Life

    Students will use geographic knowledge to connect to today's world.

    • 6.1. Objective:

      Apply geographic concepts to interpret the past.

      • 6.1.a. Indicator:

        Apply an understanding of cultures as an integrated whole including traditions, behavior patterns, and technologies.

      • 6.1.b. Indicator:

        Explain why and how individuals, groups, and institutions respond to continuity and change.

      • 6.1.c. Indicator:

        Relate economic development to the distribution of resources.

      • 6.1.d. Indicator:

        Recognize that both human choices and natural events have consequences.

    • 6.2. Objective:

      Apply geographic concepts to interpret the present and plan for the future.

      • 6.2.a. Indicator:

        Examine how the unequal distribution of resources effects economic development.

      • 6.2.b. Indicator:

        Investigate career opportunities available through the application of geography skills and concepts.

      • 6.2.c. Indicator:

        Participate in community activities respecting the environment and personal property.

  • UT.1. Standard: World Civilizations

    Students will gain an understanding of early civilizations and their contributions to the foundations of human culture.

    • 1.1. Objective:

      Speculate about the factors that led to civilized society.

      • 1.1.a. Indicator:

        Investigate hunters and gatherers.

      • 1.1.b. Indicator:

        Explore man's domestication of plants and animals.

      • 1.1.c. Indicator:

        Examine the role of irrigation in early agriculture.

    • 1.2. Objective:

      Assess the impact of geography on the locations of early civilizations.

      • 1.2.a. Indicator:

        Examine why early civilizations developed in river environments.

      • 1.2.b. Indicator:

        Evaluate the diffusion of civilizations.

    • 1.3. Objective:

      Examine the major characteristics of the early civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Indus Valley, and the Yellow River.

      • 1.3.a. Indicator:

        Analyze the social, political, and economic structure of ancient civilizations.

      • 1.3.b. Indicator:

        Investigate the technological advancements and writing systems that developed in early river valley cultures.

      • 1.3.c. Indicator:

        Identify the factors that led to the rise of cities.

  • UT.2. Standard: World Civilizations

    Students will comprehend the contributions of classical civilizations.

    • 2.1. Objective:

      Investigate the purpose and influence of religions and philosophies on classical civilizations of Greece, Rome, China, and India.

      • 2.1.a. Indicator:

        Examine the essential elements of the belief systems of Greek mythology, Judaism, Christianity, Confucianism, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Islam.

      • 2.1.b. Indicator:

        Examine the diffusion of Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

      • 2.1.c. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast the major philosophies of the Greeks and Chinese.

    • 2.2. Objective:

      Analyze the development of classical political systems.

      • 2.2.a. Indicator:

        Contrast the evolution of Athenian democracy and Spartan rule.

      • 2.2.b. Indicator:

        Examine the consequences of Persian and Macedonian expansion.

      • 2.2.c. Indicator:

        Contrast Zhou feudalism, the Greek city-state, and the caste system of India.

      • 2.2.d. Indicator:

        Compare the development of the Roman and Han empires.

    • 2.3. Objective:

      Investigate the importance of the expansion of trade.

      • 2.3.a. Indicator:

        Identify routes of early colonization; e.g., Phoenician, Greek, Hellenistic, Korean/Japanese.

      • 2.3.b. Indicator:

        Examine the technological improvements in transportation over time.

      • 2.3.c. Indicator:

        Assess the importance of the Mediterranean and East Asian trade routes.

    • 2.4. Objective:

      Evaluate the significance of classical sculpture, architecture, and performing arts.

      • 2.4.a. Indicator:

        Examine the importance and influence of Greco-Roman art and architecture.

      • 2.4.b. Indicator:

        Assess the development of Indian and Chinese architecture and art.

      • 2.4.c. Indicator:

        Investigate the importance and influence of the performing arts on classical civilizations.

    • 2.5. Objective:

      Analyze the social organization of classical cultures.

      • 2.5.a. Indicator:

        Describe the role of slavery in Greece and Rome.

      • 2.5.b. Indicator:

        Compare the role of the family in Imperial Rome and Confucian China.

      • 2.5.c. Indicator:

        Explain the caste system of India.

      • 2.5.d. Indicator:

        Compare the treatment of women in China, Athens, Sparta, India, and Rome.

  • UT.3. Standard: World Civilizations

    Students will investigate the diffusion and interaction of cultures from the Classical Period through the Age of Discovery.

    • 3.1. Objective:

      Appraise the major characteristics of interregional contact that linked the people of Africa, Asia and Europe.

      • 3.1.a. Indicator:

        Describe the impact the Silk Road had on trade across Europe and Asia.

      • 3.1.b. Indicator:

        Discuss the importance of cross-Saharan migrations.

      • 3.1.c. Indicator:

        Examine the consequences of the Crusades.

      • 3.1.d. Indicator:

        Analyze the impact of Mongol invasion on Europe and Asia.

      • 3.1.e. Indicator:

        Examine the influence of Chinese culture on Southeast Asia, Korea, and Japan.

    • 3.2. Objective:

      Assess the influence of advancing technologies on the development of societies.

      • 3.2.a. Indicator:

        Identify the significant technological developments in Tang China.

      • 3.2.b. Indicator:

        Investigate key technologies that diffused to Europe from Asia; e.g., gunpowder, printing.

      • 3.2.c. Indicator:

        Explain the consequences of the cannon and the longbow on European warfare and society.

      • 3.2.d. Indicator:

        Analyze the impact of movable type printing on Europe.

    • 3.3. Objective:

      Compare and contrast the founding and organization of Spanish and Portuguese colonial empires to northern European trading empires.

      • 3.3.a. Indicator:

        Assess the expansion of Portugal and Spain on Africa, India, and Southwest Asia.

      • 3.3.b. Indicator:

        Examine the political and military conflict between the Spanish, Portugese, and the peoples of the New World.

      • 3.3.c. Indicator:

        Assess the impact of the exchange of ideas and goods on the New and Old Worlds.

      • 3.3.d. Indicator:

        Investigate French, Dutch, and English merchants' impact on European overseas expansion.

    • 3.4. Objective:

      Investigate the rise and development of the modern European political system.

      • 3.4.a. Indicator:

        Describe the political and economic importance of the growth of towns in northern Europe.

      • 3.4.b. Indicator:

        Explain the political and economic consequences of the rise of national monarchies.

      • 3.4.c. Indicator:

        Examine the influence of mercantilism and commercial capitalism on France, England, and the Netherlands.

  • UT.4. Standard: World Civilizations

    Students will understand the influence of revolution and social change in the transition from early modern to contemporary societies.

    • 4.1. Objective:

      Assess the importance of intellectual and cultural change on early modern society.

      • 4.1.a. Indicator:

        Compare the 'rebirth' of European culture during the Renaissance with the flowering Chinese culture of the Ming dynasty; i.e., literature, art, architecture, the humanities.

      • 4.1.b. Indicator:

        Examine the key events and ideas of the Protestant Reformation, the Counter Reformation, and Neo-Confucianism.

      • 4.1.c. Indicator:

        Analyze the significant ideas and philosophies of the scientific revolution and the Enlightenment.

      • 4.1.d. Indicator:

        Examine the roles and conditions of men, women, and children in European monarchies.

    • 4.2. Objective:

      Investigate the role of revolution in the establishment of governmental systems.

      • 4.2.a. Indicator:

        Explain the political, economic, and social philosophies that lead to revolution.

      • 4.2.b. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast major world revolutions; e.g., American, French, Russian, Chinese.

    • 4.3. Objective:

      Analyze the economic transformation of production and distribution of goods in Europe.

      • 4.3.a. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast capitalism and socialism.

      • 4.3.b. Indicator:

        Explain the significance of the agricultural revolution.

      • 4.3.c. Indicator:

        Investigate the impact of the first and second Industrial Revolutions.

    • 4.4. Objective:

      Evaluate the impact of Western imperialism in Africa, Asia, and the Pacific.

      • 4.4.a. Indicator:

        Examine the impact of Western imperialism on Africa.

      • 4.4.b. Indicator:

        Compare the reactions of China, India, and Japan to foreign domination.

  • UT.5. Standard: World Civilizations

    Students will understand the interaction of peoples in the global integration of the 20th century.

    • 5.1. Objective:

      Analyze the political and economic global issues in the first half of the 20th century.

      • 5.1.a. Indicator:

        Investigate the impact of totalitarianism on Europe; i.e., Stalinism, Italian fascism, German National Socialism.

      • 5.1.b. Indicator:

        Examine the connections among WWI, the Great Depression, and WWII.

      • 5.1.c. Indicator:

        Assess the consequences of global war on the world.

    • 5.2. Objective:

      Investigate the impact of the Cold War on integration.

      • 5.2.a. Indicator:

        Explain the key elements of the Cold War.

      • 5.2.b. Indicator:

        Examine the independence movements in the African and Asian colonial world.

      • 5.2.c. Indicator:

        Determine the causes and effects of the collapse of the Soviet sphere.

    • 5.3. Objective:

      Investigate the creation of international organizations and global integration.

      • 5.3.a. Indicator:

        Assess the impact of economic and political organizations on global relations; e.g., World Trade Organization, United Nations, Olympics.

      • 5.3.b. Indicator:

        Examine the impact of advancements in worldwide communication/transportation; e.g., satellite communications, information technology/Internet, mass transportation.

      • 5.3.c. Indicator:

        Analyze the impact of military alliances; e.g., North Atlantic Treaty Organization, Warsaw Pact, United Nations Geneva Convention.

    • 5.4. Objective:

      Evaluate the impact of terrorism on the world's political, economic, and social systems.

      • 5.4.a. Indicator:

        Assess the base of terrorist networks and activities.

      • 5.4.b. Indicator:

        Examine the impact of terrorism on the lives of people.

      • 5.4.c. Indicator:

        Analyze the responses of political and economic institutions to terrorism.

  • UT.1. Standard: U.S. Government and Citizenship

    Students will understand the significance and impact of the Constitution on everyday life.

    • 1.1. Objective:

      Investigate the ideas and events that significantly influenced the creation of the United States Constitution.

      • 1.1.a. Indicator:

        Identify and summarize the philosophies that contributed to the Constitution; e.g., Machiavelli, Locke, Jefferson, Madison, Hamilton.

      • 1.1.b. Indicator:

        Identify and investigate the events that led to the creation of the Constitution.

      • 1.1.c. Indicator:

        Analyze how the idea of compromise affected the Constitution.

    • 1.2. Objective:

      Assess the essential ideas of United States constitutional government.

      • 1.2.a. Indicator:

        Examine the purposes and role of government.

      • 1.2.b. Indicator:

        Investigate the major ideas of the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and other writings; e.g., Magna Carta, English Bill of Rights, Mayflower Compact, Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation, Iroquois Confederation.

      • 1.2.c. Indicator:

        Compare the Articles of Confederation to the United States Constitution.

    • 1.3. Objective:

      Determine the importance of popular sovereignty and limited government in a democratic society.

      • 1.3.a. Indicator:

        Explain how the separation of powers is maintained through checks and balances.

      • 1.3.b. Indicator:

        Describe how the federal system of government creates a division of power.

      • 1.3.c. Indicator:

        Determine how judicial review makes the Constitution a living document.

      • 1.3.d. Indicator:

        Examine how the rule of law affects everyday life.

      • 1.3.e. Indicator:

        Investigate the necessity for civic virtue.

    • 1.4. Objective:

      Investigate the organization and functions of the United States government.

      • 1.4.a. Indicator:

        Explain how legislative, executive, and judicial powers are distributed and shared among the three branches of national government.

      • 1.4.b. Indicator:

        Describe how the United States Congress makes laws.

      • 1.4.c. Indicator:

        Examine the ways in which the executive branch carries out laws.

      • 1.4.d. Indicator:

        Investigate how laws are interpreted by courts through an adversarial process; i.e., plaintiff, defendant.

  • UT.2. Standard: U.S. Government and Citizenship

    Students will understand the protections and privileges of individuals and groups in the United States.

    • 2.1. Objective:

      Assess the freedoms and rights guaranteed in the United States Constitution.

      • 2.1.a. Indicator:

        Determine the rights and liberties outlined in the Bill of Rights.

      • 2.1.b. Indicator:

        Examine how the Bill of Rights promotes civil rights and protects diversity.

      • 2.1.c. Indicator:

        Assess the significance of the First and Fourteenth Amendments.

    • 2.2. Objective:

      Analyze how civil rights and liberties have been changed through court decisions.

      • 2.2.a. Indicator:

        Examine how the Bill of Rights promotes a just legal system.

      • 2.2.b. Indicator:

        Summarize the differing interpretations of the strict versus loose constructionists.

      • 2.2.c. Indicator:

        Identify landmark cases and their impact on civil rights and individual liberties; e.g., Dred Scott, Plessey, Brown, Miranda, Gideon, Bakke.

  • UT.3. Standard: U.S. Government and Citizenship

    Students will understand the distribution of power in the national, state, and local government in the United States federal system.

    • 3.1. Objective:

      Determine the relationship between the national government and the states.

      • 3.1.a. Indicator:

        Identify and explain the concept of federalism.

      • 3.1.b. Indicator:

        Examine the debate between federal supremacy and states' rights.

      • 3.1.c. Indicator:

        Assess the unique relationship between the sovereign American Indian nations and the United States government.

    • 3.2. Objective:

      Analyze the role of local government in the United States federal system.

      • 3.2.a. Indicator:

        Describe the powers given to local governments.

      • 3.2.b. Indicator:

        Investigate the structure and function of local government.

      • 3.2.c. Indicator:

        Assess how federal monies influence local policy and decision making.

      • 3.2.d. Indicator:

        Explore current issues affecting local governments; e.g., spending, state v. local control, land use.

      • 3.2.e. Indicator:

        Examine how public education is a function of state and local government.

  • UT.4. Standard: U.S. Government and Citizenship

    Students will understand the responsibilities of citizens in the United States.

    • 4.1. Objective:

      Investigate the responsibilities and obligations of a citizen.

      • 4.1.a. Indicator:

        Assess the need to obey laws.

      • 4.1.b. Indicator:

        Examine the election and voting process.

      • 4.1.c. Indicator:

        Examine the United States tax system.

      • 4.1.d. Indicator:

        Recognize the need for selective service in maintaining a military.

      • 4.1.e. Indicator:

        Investigate the major political parties and their ideas.

    • 4.2. Objective:

      Investigate ways in which responsible citizens take part in civic life.

      • 4.2.a. Indicator:

        Evaluate the need for civic dialogue in maintaining a democratic society; e.g., public meetings, mass meetings.

      • 4.2.b. Indicator:

        Participate in activities that promote the public good; e.g., the voting process, jury duty, community service.

    • 4.3. Objective:

      Assess methods for respectfully dealing with differences.

      • 4.3.a. Indicator:

        Analyze and evaluate conditions, actions, and motivations that contribute to conflict and cooperation.

      • 4.3.b. Indicator:

        Develop an understanding of the role of civility in dealing with individual and group differences.

  • UT.5. Standard: U.S. Government and Citizenship

    Students will understand basic economic principles and how they influence everyday life.

    • 5.1. Objective:

      Explore major economic systems.

      • 5.1.a. Indicator:

        Explain how the scarcity and abundance of productive resources contribute to economic systems.

      • 5.1.b. Indicator:

        Develop an understanding of capitalism, communism, socialism, and mixed economic systems.

      • 5.1.c. Indicator:

        Examine the problems of newly developing economies in today's world.

    • 5.2. Objective:

      Determine how supply and demand affect the availability of goods and services.

      • 5.2.a. Indicator:

        Analyze the role that prices, incentives, and profits play in determining what is produced and distributed in a competitive market system.

      • 5.2.b. Indicator:

        Determine how scarcity and choice influence governmental economic decision making.

      • 5.2.c. Indicator:

        Examine how the private and public sectors contribute to an economic system.

      • 5.2.d. Indicator:

        Analyze the role of specialization and exchange in the economic process.

  • UT.6. Standard: U.S. Government and Citizenship

    Students will understand the relationship between the United States and the international system.

    • 6.1. Objective:

      Examine major government structures and functions outside the United States.

      • 6.1.a. Indicator:

        Explain the purpose of government and analyze how government powers are acquired, used, and justified.

      • 6.1.b. Indicator:

        Compare different political systems with that of the United States; e.g., dictatorship, democracy, theocracy, monarchy, totalitarianism.

      • 6.1.c. Indicator:

        Analyze and evaluate conditions, actions, and motivations that contribute to conflict and cooperation within and among nations.

    • 6.2. Objective:

      Evaluate how United States foreign policy affects the world.

      • 6.2.a. Indicator:

        Explain the powers that the Constitution gives to the president and Congress in foreign affairs, and how these powers have been used.

      • 6.2.b. Indicator:

        Describe the process by which United States foreign policy is made; e.g., federal agencies, domestic interest groups, the public, the media.

      • 6.2.c. Indicator:

        Analyze the various ways that United States foreign policy is carried out; e.g., diplomatic, economic, military, humanitarian.

      • 6.2.d. Indicator:

        Explain how United States domestic politics affect United States foreign policy.

    • 6.3. Objective:

      Explore how the United States influences other nations, and how other nations influence the United States.

      • 6.3.a. Indicator:

        Describe the impact of the United States' concepts of democracy and individual rights on the world.

      • 6.3.b. Indicator:

        Explain how developments in other nations affect United States society and life.

      • 6.3.c. Indicator:

        Describe the role of the United States in international organizations.

  • UT.1. Standard: American Government and Law

    Students will demonstrate through both individual and group processes a variety of creative, critical, and reflective thinking skills through reading, writing, listening, speaking, and problem solving.

    • 1.1. Objective:

      Develop writing skills in social studies.

      • 1.1.a. Indicator:

        Enhance writing skills through descriptions of the government, political and legal processes.

      • 1.1.b. Indicator:

        Develop an original project or paper on government policy articulation, formulation, implementation, adjudication.

      • 1.1.c. Indicator:

        Write a paper on a legal issue presently confronting the United States and evaluate possible solutions.

    • 1.2. Objective:

      Develop social studies process skills.

      • 1.2.a. Indicator:

        Use appropriate vocabulary and terminology.

      • 1.2.b. Indicator:

        Identify main and supporting ideas and arguments in assigned reading materials.

      • 1.2.c. Indicator:

        Comprehend and arrange events in chronological order or some other sequence.

      • 1.2.d. Indicator:

        Interpret or create graphs, charts, statistics, newspapers, political articles, and observations of political events.

  • UT.2. Standard: American Government and Law

    Students will understand a comprehensive geographical view of the human and physical worlds and why and how they influence and relate to the environment, societies, and to global interconnectedness and interdependence.

    • 2.1. Objective:

      Develop map and globe skills of space and place.

      • 2.1.a. Indicator:

        Demonstrate how sectionalism and geographic location have caused conflict throughout United States governmental history; e.g., the Civil War, economic policy disputes, solid south, farm parity movement, Jim Crow laws.

      • 2.1.b. Indicator:

        Demonstrate an understanding of the practical consequences of political geography on demographics; e.g., Congressional reapportionment, gerrymandering, the electoral college, geographic ticket balance.

      • 2.1.c. Indicator:

        Explain how geographic divisions at the community, county, state, and national levels relate to the unique American approach to federalism.

      • 2.1.d. Indicator:

        Demonstrate knowledge of how United States domestic and foreign policy has been affected by geographical factors.

    • 2.2. Objective: Develop, plan, and evaluate alternative uses of the environment and natural resources

      • 2.2.a. Indicator:

        Explain how governments balance costs and benefits in their formulation of environmental policy.

      • 2.2.b. Indicator:

        Discuss how governments attempt to control or modify the environment to satisfy the needs of their citizenry and the national interest.

      • 2.2.c. Indicator:

        Predict how environmental issues result in changing needs and conflicts for various groups and interests.

  • UT.3. Standard: American Government and Law

    Students will demonstrate why and how ideas, attitudes, events, persons, movements, and documents have influenced humanity.

    • 3.1. Objective:

      Historical interpretations of the role of government and law evolve with change in society.

      • 3.1.a. Indicator:

        Identify and describe major historical eras of U. S. history as they relate to the development of American governmental, legal, and political processes.

      • 3.1.b. Indicator:

        Identify the key principles and provisions of the United States Constitution.

      • 3.1.c. Indicator:

        Apply law-related and citizenship education concepts to a legal issue currently being discussed in the court, government or legal system.

      • 3.1.d. Indicator:

        Demonstrate an understanding of the historic development and structure of the federal judicial system.

      • 3.1.e. Indicator:

        Explain how specific Constitutional concepts including judicial review, states' rights, due process, and national supremacy have affected the historical development of the United States.

    • 3.2. Objective:

      Students will demonstrate why and how our governmental and legal systems have been influenced over time by ideas, attitudes, events, persons, movements, and documents.

      • 3.2.a. Indicator:

        Define major periods in the development of American political culture and ideology.

      • 3.2.b. Indicator:

        Describe the development and dynamics of the two-party system.

      • 3.2.c. Indicator:

        Trace the broadening of participatory democracy over the course of American history; e.g., expanding voting rights, civil, criminal, and juvenile rights.

      • 3.2.d. Indicator:

        Discuss significant contributions of philosophy, religion, art, literature, sociology, science, and other fields to American government and law.

    • 3.3. Objective:

      Students will analyze and apply various political and economic theories to the development of contemporary society.

      • 3.3.a. Indicator:

        Describe various political and economic theories; e.g., Turner, Marx, strict constructionism, economic determinism.

      • 3.3.b. Indicator:

        Hypothesize how specific sociopolitical factors influence change; e.g., in population, economy, societal values.

  • UT.4. Standard: American Government and Law

    Students will demonstrate why people in different societies create and adopt systems of government and how each addresses human needs, rights, and citizen responsibilities.

    • 4.1. Objective:

      Identify and examine the competing ideas about the necessity and purposes of politics, government, and law.

      • 4.1.a. Indicator:

        Explain the role of government and how the law affects individual citizens and groups using law-related and citizenship education concepts and methods.

      • 4.1.b. Indicator:

        Discuss the purposes of constitutions and judicial systems and how they affect the political, economic and social systems of societies.

      • 4.1.c. Indicator:

        Examine the conditions under which constitutional governments flourish and conditions under which they do not, and the role that citizens play.

      • 4.1.d. Indicator:

        Compare alternative governments and political systems.

    • 4.2. Objective:

      Identify and examine persisting issues involving the balance between individual rights and the general welfare.

      • 4.2.a. Indicator:

        Describe how political change and stability affect the values and needs of individuals and groups.

      • 4.2.b. Indicator:

        Summarize the historical importance of various Supreme Court decisions and Acts of Congress in the development of individual rights; e.g., Dred Scott v. Sanford, Goss v. Lopez, Brown v. Board of Education, the Civil Rights Acts of 1964 and 1991, Miranda v. Arizona, Gideon v. Wainwright, Texas v. Johnson.

      • 4.2.c. Indicator:

        Describe similarities and/or differences of various groups seeking civil rights.

      • 4.2.d. Indicator:

        Describe how the federal government has become the primary protector of individual civil rights through constitutional interpretations of the Supreme Court.

      • 4.2.e. Indicator:

        Describe and analyze civic responsibilities.

      • 4.2.f. Indicator:

        Explain how the courts' role in citizenship protects individual rights using law-related strategies.

    • 4.3. Objective:

      Compare different political systems, their ideologies, institutions, processes, and political cultures.

      • 4.3.a. Indicator:

        Explain the differences between federal and centralized systems of government and give examples of each.

      • 4.3.b. Indicator:

        Compare different ways governments gain legitimacy; e.g., the constitutional monarchy of Great Britain, representative democracy of the United States.

      • 4.3.c. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast the structure and function of political parties in the United States and other nations.

      • 4.3.d. Indicator:

        Discuss the political attitudes and responsibilities of American citizens.

    • 4.4. Objective:

      Compare the ways societies and organizations respond to conflicts between forces of unity and forces of diversity.

      • 4.4.a. Indicator:

        Evaluate activist versus a restrained Supreme Court.

      • 4.4.b. Indicator:

        Discuss tolerance in relation to a variety of issues.

      • 4.4.c. Indicator:

        Discuss mistrust of government.

      • 4.4.d. Indicator:

        Explain the difference an individual citizen can make.

      • 4.4.e. Indicator:

        Explain why a certain level of political diversity, competition, and tolerance is necessary in a functioning democracy.

  • UT.5. Standard: American Government and Law

    Students will demonstrate why and how commonalities and differences of ideas, attitudes, choices and technologies influence the interaction and behavior of individuals, groups, institutions, and cultures.

    • 5.1. Objective:

      Apply an understanding of how societal traditions, ideas, and behavior patterns affect political culture and legal traditions.

      • 5.1.a. Indicator:

        Define political culture and identify the dominant aspects.

      • 5.1.b. Indicator:

        Discuss factors affecting ideology and party identification.

      • 5.1.c. Indicator:

        Write an elected official and express your opinion or concerns regarding a law-related issue.

      • 5.1.d. Indicator:

        Visit the legislature during the legislative session and analyze a piece of legislation under discussion.

    • 5.2. Objective:

      Utilize a variety of resources to interpret cultural values and standards.

      • 5.2.a. Indicator:

        Discuss how American political culture and law have been influenced by a wide variety of events and factors; e.g., English Common Law, the American Revolution, the nation's religious heritage and, the changing of family structure and roles.

      • 5.2.b. Indicator:

        Analyze class consciousness in the United States.

    • 5.3. Objective:

      Explain why individuals, groups, and institutions respond to change in a particular way on the basis of shared assumptions, ideas, and technologies.

      • 5.3.a. Indicator:

        List the sources and assess the influence of political attitudes in the United States.

      • 5.3.b. Indicator:

        Describe the role that perceptions, beliefs and interests play in defining government policy.

      • 5.3.c. Indicator:

        Use technology to research case law.

    • 5.4. Objective:

      Describe the various forms and roles that institutions take in furthering both continuity and change within their governments and legal systems.

      • 5.4.a. Indicator:

        Describe and differentiate majoritarian, interest-group, client, and entrepreneurial politics; e.g., League of Women Voters, Libertarian, ACLU.

      • 5.4.b. Indicator:

        Explain why members of Congress differ over how to address public policy issues.

      • 5.4.c. Indicator:

        Describe how Congress and the Supreme Court affect the role of the President.

      • 5.4.d. Indicator:

        Discuss the role bureaucracy plays in policy-making.

      • 5.4.e. Indicator:

        Explain how an activist court system can influence public policy.

  • UT.6. Standard: American Government and Law

    Students will demonstrate why societies organize available resources for the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.

    • 6.1. Objective:

      Explain how the scarcity of productive resources requires the development of economic systems to make basic decisions about how goods and services are produced and distributed.

      • 6.1.a. Indicator:

        Identify the key agencies and actors in the formulation of economic policy.

      • 6.1.b. Indicator:

        Summarize the major competing economic theories that have influenced American economic policy.

    • 6.2. Objective:

      Compare and contrast the various economic institutions, that comprise economic systems including households, business firms, banks, government agencies, labor unions and corporations.

      • 6.2.a. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast political systems and describe how these respective governments make economic decisions; e.g., democracy, socialism communism, dictatorships, monarchies, oligarchies, aristocracies, and fascism.

      • 6.2.b. Indicator:

        Demonstrate how financial institutions work and what services they provide.

      • 6.2.c. Indicator:

        Explain the interrelationship between business interests and government.

      • 6.2.d. Indicator:

        Analyze the influences of social institutions and mass communication on an individual's perception of the world.

      • 6.2.e. Indicator:

        Consider different strategies for dealing with situations arising from conflicting beliefs, levels of education, and socioeconomic status.

    • 6.3. Objective:

      Apply economic concepts and economic reasoning to historical and contemporary developments in government and law.

      • 6.3.a. Indicator:

        Discuss how the development of the United States from an agricultural to an industrial nation has altered our approach to government.

      • 6.3.b. Indicator:

        Trace the development of monopolies and their effect on society.

      • 6.3.c. Indicator:

        Trace the interactions of government and various special interest groups.

      • 6.3.d. Indicator:

        Display a practical knowledge of how collective bargaining is utilized by labor unions and business.

      • 6.3.e. Indicator:

        Distinguish between democratic, republican, and other ideological views on unions and business.

  • UT.7. Standard: American Government and Law

    Students will demonstrate why and how lifelong learning, collaboration, and responsible citizenship are necessary to promote personal and public good.

    • 7.1. Objective:

      Demonstrate the characteristics of a lifelong learner in school activities.

      • 7.1.a. Indicator:

        Consider different strategies for coping with situations which arise from conflicting ideas, and socioeconomic conditions in the past and at the present time.

      • 7.1.b. Indicator:

        Organize resources and time efficiently.

      • 7.1.c. Indicator:

        Use appropriate strategies to identify and meet needs and goals.

    • 7.2. Objective:

      Demonstrate collaboration in working with others to achieve specified results.

      • 7.2.a. Indicator:

        Describe ways in which government works to deal with conflict and to make decisions relating to the common good.

      • 7.2.b. Indicator:

        Understand how citizens can work together to change or implement legislation.

      • 7.2.c. Indicator:

        Listen with respect to the ideas and views of others.

      • 7.2.d. Indicator:

        Demonstrate an understanding of the group's needs or goals.

      • 7.2.e. Indicator:

        Show respect and willingness to participate in group problem-solving activities while serving in a variety of roles.

      • 7.2.f. Indicator:

        Demonstrate the ability to resolve conflicts positively.

      • 7.2.g. Indicator:

        Use multiple resources effectively.

      • 7.2.h. Indicator:

        Participate in a community, county, or state political campaign.

      • 7.2.i. Indicator:

        Identify careers in government and law.

    • 7.3. Objective:

      Demonstrates an understanding of, and a reasoned commitment to, the rule of law.

      • 7.3.a. Indicator:

        Respect and defend individual rights and property.

      • 7.3.b. Indicator:

        Demonstrate individual responsibility; e.g., school policy, voting, motor vehicle laws.

      • 7.3.c. Indicator:

        Recognize how individual choices and actions affect self, family, and community.

      • 7.3.d. Indicator:

        Understand the development of government and law and its function and practice in modern society.

      • 7.3.e. Indicator:

        Demonstrate respect for elected authorities.

  • UT.1. Standard: Anthropology

    Students will demonstrate through individual and group processes a variety of critical, causal, interpretive, and reflective thinking skills through observing, reading, writing, listening, speaking, and problem solving.

    • 1.1. Objective:

      Develop observation skills to foster inquiry in social studies.

      • 1.1.a. Indicator:

        Make lists of a variety of human customs; e.g., types of food, types of body decoration, different family types.

      • 1.1.b. Indicator:

        Recognize the differences in the four sub-disciplines of anthropology and be able to sort information according to each sub-discipline.

      • 1.1.c. Indicator:

        Analyze magazine and newspaper articles to broaden awareness of unfamiliar customs and beliefs.

    • 1.2. Objective:

      Develop writing skills in social studies.

      • 1.2.a. Indicator:

        Recreate a life story of a person from a different culture; e.g., Kung Bushmen, Mid-East Nomad, Amazon Indian.

      • 1.2.b. Indicator:

        Develop a glossary of anthropological terms, people and concepts.

      • 1.2.c. Indicator:

        Compile a list of questions about a new group of people and write a persuasive position paper on a technologically primitive lifestyle; e.g., Plains Indians during the 19th century, modern tribes in the Amazon, Amish in North America.

    • 1.3. Objective:

      Develop reading skills in social studies.

      • 1.3.a. Indicator:

        Read a biography of a famous anthropologist.

      • 1.3.b. Indicator:

        Read and summarize an anthropological monograph about another culture.

      • 1.3.c. Indicator:

        Read an autobiography of a person from another culture and outline or chart the similarities and differences.

      • 1.3.d. Indicator:

        Isolate the probable relationship between a culture's environment and its ideology; e.g., examine how cultures differ between the people of Highland New Guinea and the people in the Middle East.

    • 1.4. Objective:

      Develop critical analysis skills in social studies.

      • 1.4.a. Indicator:

        Analyze the world's seven major language groups by making a language tree, showing which languages have developed into others; e.g., Indo- European, Athabaskan, Swahili.

      • 1.4.b. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast the relationship between a culture's social structure and the types of gods and supernatural beings the culture believes in.

      • 1.4.c. Indicator:

        Use the concept of culture to analyze individual and cultural choices including how much influence culture has on choices.

    • 1.5. Objective:

      Develop interpretive skills in social studies.

      • 1.5.a. Indicator:

        Compare, contrast, and analyze differing perceptions of fellow classmates, teachers, and theorists.

      • 1.5.b. Indicator:

        Identify what biases and ethnocentric tendencies anthropologists have; e.g., Malinowski, Mead, Evans-Pritchard, Goodall, Leakey.

      • 1.5.c. Indicator:

        Discuss an anthropological topic that affects daily living; e.g., benefits of technology, available food resources, rites of passage.

    • 1.6. Objective:

      Develop creative thinking skills in social studies.

      • 1.6.a. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast the lives of various peoples in the world; e.g., indigenous communities, gender roles, treatment of the elderly.

      • 1.6.b. Indicator:

        Predict and justify the demographic layout of the world in one hundred years.

      • 1.6.c. Indicator:

        Make a time line or chart which demonstrates how social institutions have changed over time.

  • UT.2. Standard: Anthropology

    Students will understand a comprehensive geographical view of the human and physical worlds and why and how they influence and relate to the environment, societies, and to global interconnectedness and interdependence.

    • 2.1. Objective:

      Develop map and globe skills of space and place.

      • 2.1.a. Indicator:

        On a map, locate and identify four sample cultures from each of the main technological levels of human development; e.g., hunter-gatherer, pastoral, horticultural, agricultural, industrial.

      • 2.1.b. Indicator:

        Locate and label with dates the major fossil finds in Africa relevant to human ancestry.

    • 2.2. Objective:

      Develop, plan and evaluate alternative uses of environments and resources.

      • 2.2.a. Indicator:

        Identify similar environments and hypothesize how the cultures are similar and different; e.g., vegetation, animal sources, weather.

      • 2.2.b. Indicator:

        Chart or graph the use of finite natural resources and predict the effects on human population.

      • 2.2.c. Indicator:

        Outline ten different cultures around the world according to the way they use resources and energy.

    • 2.3. Objective:

      Demonstrate global awareness of interconnectedness and interdependence.

      • 2.3.a. Indicator:

        Diagram and chart specific cultures involved in the international trading of products; e.g., ownership, location, benefits.

      • 2.3.b. Indicator:

        Interview doctors and pharmacists to determine discoveries from rain forests that have medicinal value.

      • 2.3.c. Indicator:

        Predict the effect of the chain reaction if natural resources are altered.

  • UT.3. Standard: Anthropology

    Students will demonstrate why and how ideas, attitudes, events, persons, movements, and documents have influenced humanity.

    • 3.1. Objective:

      Demonstrate that historical knowledge and the concept of time are culturally influenced.

      • 3.1.a. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast the 'linear' concept of time that modern America uses with the 'circular' concept of time that Native American cultures use.

      • 3.1.b. Indicator:

        Distinguish the historical perspectives that different cultures have on a variety of topics.

      • 3.1.c. Indicator:

        Collect examples of the way cultures interpret and understand medical and scientific experiences.

    • 3.2. Objective:

      Identify selected periods or movements of historical change within and across cultures.

      • 3.2.a. Indicator:

        Summarize the main theories of cultural change in anthropology and identify examples of each from different parts of the globe and at different times in history.

      • 3.2.b. Indicator:

        Select and write an historical account of cultural change from a society's perspective; e.g., how the Trobriand Islanders substituted the game of cricket for war, a battle between U. S. Cavalry and North American Indians.

      • 3.2.c. Indicator:

        Evaluate the effects of culture clash on communities; e.g., colonialism, exploration, missionary work.

    • 3.3. Objective:

      Use ideas, theories, and modes of inquiry drawn from history in the analysis of contemporary society.

      • 3.3.a. Indicator:

        Evaluate contemporary American society in light of the beliefs and views of primitive people; e.g., divorce rates, levels of violence, family time, destruction of environment, equality, child care, treatment of elderly.

      • 3.3.b. Indicator:

        Identify concepts and principles adopted from other cultures that have influenced American democracy; e.g., Magna Carta, English Common Law, Hammurabiis Code, the League of the Iroquois.

  • UT.4. Standard: Anthropology

    Students will demonstrate why people in different societies create and adopt systems of government and how each addresses human needs, rights, and citizen responsibilities.

    • 4.1. Objective:

      Identify and examine persisting issues involving the rights, role and status of the individual in relation to the general welfare.

      • 4.1.a. Indicator:

        Identify differences in community between cultures; e.g., Bedouins, Hutterites, Yanomamo, Pygmies.

      • 4.1.b. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast the rights, roles, and status of individuals in various types of cultures; e.g., hunter/gatherer, horticultural, pastoral, agricultural and industrial.

      • 4.1.c. Indicator:

        Describe how the roles, rights and status of minorities have changed throughout history in the U. S.

    • 4.2. Objective:

      Compare and contrast different political systems, their ideologies, institutions, processes and political cultures.

      • 4.2.a. Indicator:

        Identify several groups in the U. S. and the ways they have participated in the political process.

      • 4.2.b. Indicator:

        Examine the similarities and differences of the political systems of various North American Indian groups.

    • 4.3. Objective:

      Compare and contrast the ways in which societies and organizations respond to conflict.

      • 4.3.a. Indicator:

        Specify how different cultures solve conflict; e.g., banishment, divination, trial by ordeal, judicial system with codified law.

      • 4.3.b. Indicator:

        Isolate the factors that typically ensure victory in a societal conflict.

      • 4.3.c. Indicator:

        Evaluate a historical conflict between two cultures; e.g., Cortez in Mexico, India's struggle for independence from Britain, the Sioux, and the U. S.

  • UT.5. Standard: Anthropology

    Students will demonstrate why and how commonalities and differences of ideas, attitudes, and technologies influence the interaction and behavior of individuals, groups, institutions, and cultures.

    • 5.1. Objective:

      Apply an understanding of culture as an integrated whole that includes traditions, ideas, behavior patterns and artifacts.

      • 5.1.a. Indicator:

        Summarize the traditions, ideas, and artifacts of one culture from each of the six continents.

      • 5.1.b. Indicator:

        Analyze several definitions of culture.

    • 5.2. Objective:

      Identify and describe both current and historic examples of interdependence between individuals and societies.

      • 5.2.a. Indicator:

        Demonstrate how change in one area of a culture has a ripple effect and causes change in other areas of the culture.

      • 5.2.b. Indicator:

        Explain the effects of religion on various aspects of culture; e.g., Christianity, Hinduism, Taoism, Animism.

    • 5.3. Objective:

      Explain why individuals, groups, and institutions respond to change in a particular way on the basis of shared assumptions and technologies.

      • 5.3.a. Indicator:

        Investigate the concepts of cosmology, religious explanations, and scientific explanations and how they effect world view; e.g., how does the world work, how do humans control nature, why do people suffer?

      • 5.3.b. Indicator:

        Research examples of how a particular culture responded to change based on shared assumptions, beliefs and technologies.

    • 5.4. Objective:

      Describe the various forms and roles institutions take in furthering both continuity and change.

      • 5.4.a. Indicator:

        List those institutions which encourage continuity within a culture.

      • 5.4.b. Indicator:

        Debate the effects that institutions have on cultural change.

  • UT.6. Standard: Anthropology

    Students will demonstrate why societies organize available resources for the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.

    • 6.1. Objective:

      Explain how the scarcity of productive resources including natural, human and capital goods require the development of economic systems to make basic decisions about how goods and services are produced and distributed.

      • 6.1.a. Indicator:

        Examine the relationship between what a society values; e.g., gold, seashells, oil, water, and their scarcity in their local environment.

      • 6.1.b. Indicator:

        Determine what factors go into basic decisions about how goods and services are produced and distributed; e.g., is it scarcity of resources? is it who owns the resources? is it who benefits in the sale of the resources? is it the type of governmental system? is it religious ideology?

      • 6.1.c. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast the ways different cultures determine how to produce and distribute scarce resources.

      • 6.1.d. Indicator:

        Find examples in American history and culture of unusual methods of redistribution of scarce goods; e.g., what in America resembles a barter system, what in America resembles a redistribution system?

    • 6.2. Objective:

      Compare and contrast the various economic institutions that comprise economic systems; e.g., households, business firms, banks, government agencies, labor unions, and corporations.

      • 6.2.a. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast various economic institutions in our system with typical economic customs in preindustrial cultures including household production, sharing of natural resources, feasts to redistribute, trading to get equal return rather than profit.

      • 6.2.b. Indicator:

        Compare the structure of a corporation to a unilineal clan organization.

      • 6.2.c. Indicator:

        Explain the concept of a household as an economic system and as a domestic mode of production.

    • 6.3. Objective:

      Apply economic concepts and economic reasoning to historical and contemporary social developments and issues.

      • 6.3.a. Indicator:

        Analyze cultures that were forcibly changed by outside influences; e.g., black slaves that were brought to the United States, South American Indians who were conquered by the conquistadors, Amish who were assimilated into American life.

      • 6.3.b. Indicator:

        Determine and predict changes in the class system of the United States; e.g., wages, tax laws, welfare.

      • 6.3.c. Indicator:

        Recognize and explain the two theories in the field of economic anthropology, formal western economics and substantive economics.

  • UT.7. Standard: Anthropology

    Students will demonstrate why and how lifelong learning, collaboration, and responsible citizenship are necessary to promote the personal and public good.

    • 7.1. Objective:

      Demonstrate the characteristics of lifelong learning in school activities.

      • 7.1.a. Indicator:

        Analyze how people are similar or different depending upon their culture.

      • 7.1.b. Indicator:

        Consider various views and different strategies in a variety of cultures for coping with situations which arise from conflicting beliefs, and socioeconomic conditions.

      • 7.1.c. Indicator:

        Evaluate the strategies used by various groups to identify and meet needs and goals.

      • 7.1.d. Indicator:

        Organize personal resources and time efficiently.

      • 7.1.e. Indicator:

        Investigate career opportunities in anthropology, archeology, linguistics and physical anthropology.

    • 7.2. Objective:

      Demonstrate collaboration in working with others to achieve specified results.

      • 7.2.a. Indicator:

        Investigate the importance of the individual in various types of societies.

      • 7.2.b. Indicator:

        Discuss the reasons why people in American society might join and contribute to group activities. Compare and contrast those reasons with the reasons that might be listed for a hunter-gatherer society or a horticultural society.

      • 7.2.c. Indicator:

        Demonstrate the ability to work in a group and to develop consensus or a course of action.

      • 7.2.d. Indicator:

        Resolve conflicts positively.

      • 7.2.e. Indicator:

        Use resources effectively.

    • 7.3. Objective:

      Demonstrate an understanding of, and a reasoned commitment to, the rule of law.

      • 7.3.a. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast the source of laws in American society to the source of law and rules in preindustrial and/or non-democratic societies.

      • 7.3.b. Indicator:

        Select several cultures and specify the differences between their legal systems and the legal system in the United States.

      • 7.3.c. Indicator:

        Discuss the importance of participation in the civic process.

      • 7.3.d. Indicator:

        Recognize how individual choices and actions affect the individual, the family, and the community in several societies.

      • 7.3.e. Indicator:

        Understand the impact of resources upon the development of economic, political, social, or environmental systems.

      • 7.3.f. Indicator:

        Demonstrate cultural understanding, responsibility and appreciation.

  • UT.1. Standard: Economics

    Students will demonstrate through individual group processes a variety of creative, critical, causal, interpretive, and reflective thinking skills through observing, reading, writing, listening, speaking, and problem solving.

    • 1.1. Objective:

      Develop observation skills to foster inquiry in economics.

      • 1.1.a. Indicator:

        Use current events to predict possible economic problems and solutions.

      • 1.1.b. Indicator:

        Construct questions, based on observations, that can be used to address changes in the economy.

    • 1.2. Objective:

      Develop writing skills in economics.

      • 1.2.a. Indicator:

        Define in your own words basic economic concepts e.g., opportunity cost, supply, demand, equilibrium, price, and elasticity.

      • 1.2.b. Indicator:

        Write and document a research project reflecting an economic problem or concept.

    • 1.3. Objective:

      Develop reading skills in economics.

      • 1.3.a. Indicator:

        Use appropriate vocabulary; e.g., opportunity cost, supply, demand, equilibrium, price, elasticity.

      • 1.3.b. Indicator:

        Read and identify different points of view concerning economic theory and/or decisions.

    • 1.4. Objective:

      Develop speaking skills in economics.

      • 1.4.a. Indicator:

        Participate in group discussions, activities, and planning sessions.

      • 1.4.b. Indicator:

        Defend a point of view when giving an oral presentation.

    • 1.5. Objective:

      Develop listening skills in economics.

      • 1.5.a. Indicator:

        Listen to and evaluate various sources of information when forming an opinion or course of action in solving an economic problem.

      • 1.5.b. Indicator:

        Find the main and supporting ideas from a discussion, lecture, or media presentation.

    • 1.6. Objective:

      Develop causal reasoning skills in economics.

      • 1.6.a. Indicator:

        Separate fact from interpretation of facts.

      • 1.6.b. Indicator:

        Explain cause and effect relationships.

      • 1.6.c. Indicator:

        Evaluate the idea that events and actions have consequences.

      • 1.6.d. Indicator:

        Apply causal reasoning to information seen, heard, or read.

      • 1.6.e. Indicator:

        Evaluate the economic value of community service for individuals, businesses, and government entities.

    • 1.7. Objective:

      Develop critical analysis skills in economics.

      • 1.7.a. Indicator:

        Use analogies from the lives of students to explain economic choices.

      • 1.7.b. Indicator:

        Collect economic data about Utah using specific topics or themes.

      • 1.7.c. Indicator:

        Construct a simple analysis of data using graphs, charts, and tables from databases.

    • 1.8. Objective:

      Develop interpretive skills in economics.

      • 1.8.a. Indicator:

        Modify opinions and solutions based on additional information.

      • 1.8.b. Indicator:

        Read and interpret economic graphs and apply them in their appropriate context.

    • 1.9. Objective:

      Develop creative thinking in economics.

      • 1.9.a. Indicator:

        Develop solutions and predict outcomes to an economic situation, based on economic data.

      • 1.9.b. Indicator:

        Discuss problems and potential solutions using brainstorming strategies.

      • 1.9.c. Indicator:

        Predict how future changes in technology may affect your personal life.

    • 1.10. Objective:

      Develop research and presentation skills.

      • 1.10.a. Indicator:

        Demonstrate how to access information on current economic indicators and market conditions.

      • 1.10.b. Indicator:

        Present an oral report on an economic concept using current events.

      • 1.10.c. Indicator:

        Explore general economic trends using relevant sources; e.g., The Wall Street Journal, business/economic television programming, weekly business publications.

    • 1.11. Objective:

      Explore career opportunities in economics.

      • 1.11.a. Indicator:

        Identify employment trends.

      • 1.11.b. Indicator:

        Explore the educational paths recommended to be a business or social economist.

      • 1.11.c. Indicator:

        Show how economic knowledge can be used in any occupation.

  • UT.2. Standard: Economics

    Students will understand a comprehensive geographical view of the human and physical worlds and why and how they influence and relate to the environment, societies, and to global interconnectedness and interdependence.

    • 2.1. Objective:

      Develop map and globe skills of space and place.

      • 2.1.a. Indicator:

        Use natural resources and population density maps to predict the potential economic activity of a region.

      • 2.1.b. Indicator:

        Locate historical and /or current regions where examples of the world's major economic systems can be found i.e., traditional, market, mixed-market, and command.

    • 2.2. Objective:

      Develop, plan, and evaluate alternative uses of environments and resources.

      • 2.2.a. Indicator:

        Analyze how human and physical changes on the earth can affect business cycles i.e., inflation/deflation, depression/recession, expansion/contraction.

      • 2.2.b. Indicator:

        Analyze how comparative and absolute advantage may lead to or impede international trade.

      • 2.2.c. Indicator:

        Explain how major economic indicators such as gross national product, unemployment, stock market, and consumer price index reflect the interaction among nations.

  • UT.3. Standard: Economics

    Students will demonstrate why and how ideas, attitudes, events, persons, movements, and documents have influenced humanity.

    • 3.1. Objective:

      Demonstrate that historical interpretation and knowledge of economic systems are socially influenced.

      • 3.1.a. Indicator:

        Trace the development of the world's major economic systems over time i.e., traditional, market, mixed-market, and command.

      • 3.1.b. Indicator:

        Trace the development of money as a socially acceptable medium of exchange.

      • 3.1.c. Indicator:

        Briefly outline the history of the Federal Reserve System.

    • 3.2. Objective:

      Identify and describe selected periods or movements of historical change within and across cultures.

      • 3.2.a. Indicator:

        Describe the nature and causes of business cycles, using examples from selected periods of time i.e., inflation/deflation, depression/recession, expansion/contraction.

      • 3.2.b. Indicator:

        Identify and summarize specific examples of international trade throughout history; e.g., the Roman Era, European, African and Asian trade routes, mercantilism, and Post-Cold War economic unions.

      • 3.2.c. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast labor force trends which have affected economies and predict the future of the labor movement based on past history.

      • 3.2.d. Indicator:

        Identify and compare examples of taxation throughout different historical periods with the 1990s.

    • 3.3. Objective:

      Use ideas, theories, and modes of inquiry drawn from history in the analysis of contemporary social arrangements.

      • 3.3.a. Indicator:

        Cite examples of how the philosophy of capitalism has impacted attitudes toward private property, private enterprise, and freedom of choice.

      • 3.3.b. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast current examples of four types of market structures found in the United States i.e., pure monopoly, oligopoly, monopolistic competition, and pure competition.

  • UT.4. Standard: Economics

    Students will demonstrate why people in different societies create and adopt systems of government and how each addresses human needs, rights, and citizen responsibilities.

    • 4.1. Objective:

      Identify and examine persistent issues involving the rights, roles, and status of the individual in relation to the general welfare.

      • 4.1.a. Indicator:

        Explain the role of the 'invisible hand' and the 'profit motive' in redirecting self-interested behavior toward serving the public interest.

      • 4.1.b. Indicator:

        Analyze situations where the market system fails to maximize the public interest including monopolies and externalities.

    • 4.2. Objective:

      Compare and contrast different political systems, their ideologies, institutions, processes, and political cultures.

      • 4.2.a. Indicator:

        Analyze the economic advantages and disadvantages of the major economic systems i.e., traditional, market, mixed-market, socialist, and command.

      • 4.2.b. Indicator:

        Explain how free enterprise answers the basic economic questions of what, how, when, and for whom goods and services are produced.

    • 4.3. Objective:

      Compare and contrast the ways societies and organizations respond to conflicts between the forces of unity and the forces of diversity.

      • 4.3.a. Indicator:

        Explain how the market economy coordinates the actions of otherwise competitive individuals and firms.

      • 4.3.b. Indicator:

        Evaluate the role of international trade agreements in reducing and/or escalating global conflicts.

    • 4.4. Objective:

      Identify the relationships between the private and public sectors of the economy.

      • 4.4.a. Indicator:

        Illustrate the relationship between households, firms, government and international sector, using the concept of the circular flow of economics.

      • 4.4.b. Indicator:

        Explain how individuals and groups use the public sector to serve the private interest.

  • UT.5. Standard: Economics

    Students will demonstrate why and how commonalities and differences of ideas, attitudes, choices, and technologies influence the interaction and behavior of individuals, groups, institutions, and cultures.

    • 5.1. Objective:

      Apply an understanding of culture as an integrated whole that relates to traditions, attitudes, behavioral patterns, and artifacts.

      • 5.1.a. Indicator:

        Analyze the ways in which available resources can help to shape the traits of culture within a given group.

      • 5.1.b. Indicator:

        Evaluate how cultural traditions, attitudes and behavior patterns influence the perceived value of various factors of production within a given society.

    • 5.2. Objective:

      Identify and describe both current and historical examples of the interaction and interdependence of individuals and societies in a variety of cultural settings.

      • 5.2.a. Indicator:

        Describe the various roles and norms that govern the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services within the following societies; e.g., hunter/gatherer, pastoral, horticultural, agricultural, industrial, and information/technological.

      • 5.2.b. Indicator:

        Explain the operation of supply and demand in the mixed-market economy of the United States.

    • 5.3. Objective:

      Explain why individuals, groups, and institutions respond to change in a particular way on the basis of shared assumptions, and technologies.

      • 5.3.a. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast the ways in which cultural variation within and among societies helps to create differences in the economic value of resources.

      • 5.3.b. Indicator:

        Explain how change in personal life situations helps to shape personal economic decisions.

    • 5.4. Objective:

      Describe the various forms and roles institutions take in furthering both continuity and change.

      • 5.4.a. Indicator:

        Analyze the role of education in helping individuals to change their economic status.

      • 5.4.b. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast the ways in which government economic policies both impede and promote economic growth within society.

  • UT.6. Standard: Economics

    Students will demonstrate why societies organize available resources for the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.

    • 6.1. Objective:

      Explain how the scarcity of productive resources including natural, human, and capital goods requires the development of economic systems to make basic decisions about how goods and services are to be produced and distributed.

      • 6.1.a. Indicator:

        List and describe the primary factors of production.

      • 6.1.b. Indicator:

        Identify the principal elements of scarcity in the context of unlimited wants and limited resources.

      • 6.1.c. Indicator:

        Evaluate the tradeoffs involved in alternative uses of resources using the production possibilities curve.

    • 6.2. Objective: Compare and contrast the various economic institutions that comprise economic systems

      households, firms, banks, government agencies, labor unions, corporations, and the stock market.

      • 6.2.a. Indicator:

        Analyze the advantages and disadvantages of the four types of market structures; i.e., pure monopoly, oligopoly, monopolistic competition, and pure competition.

      • 6.2.b. Indicator:

        Explain the relationship between financial institutions and the Federal Reserve System in creation and control of the money supply.

      • 6.2.c. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast the basic forms of business ownership; e.g., sole proprietorship, partnership, corporation, franchise, and cooperatives.

      • 6.2.d. Indicator:

        Explain the role of entrepreneurs in organizing and allocating economic resources.

    • 6.3. Objective:

      Apply economic concepts and economic reasoning to historical and contemporary social developments and issues.

      • 6.3.a. Indicator:

        Identify and discuss major economic indicators; e.g., gross national product, unemployment, price indexes, stock and bond market indexes.

      • 6.3.b. Indicator:

        Evaluate the usefulness of alternative economic indicators as measures of social welfare and progress.

      • 6.3.c. Indicator:

        Describe the nature and causes of business cycles.

      • 6.3.d. Indicator:

        Explain the relationship between saving, investment, and economic growth.

      • 6.3.e. Indicator:

        Explain the relationship among sustainable economic growth, environmental issues, and other social goals.

  • UT.7. Standard: Economics

    Students will demonstrate why and how lifelong learning, collaboration, and responsible citizenship are necessary to promote personal and public good.

    • 7.1. Objective:

      Demonstrate the characteristics of lifelong learning in school activities.

      • 7.1.a. Indicator:

        Use appropriate strategies to identify and meet needs and goals.

      • 7.1.b. Indicator:

        Organize resources and time efficiently.

      • 7.1.c. Indicator:

        Explore and reflect on the philosophical views of others and support your own views with logical reasoning.

      • 7.1.d. Indicator:

        Analyze the influence of economic institutions and mass communication on an individual's perception of the world.

      • 7.1.e. Indicator:

        Investigate career opportunities in economics.

    • 7.2. Objective:

      Demonstrate collaboration in working with others to achieve specified results.

      • 7.2.a. Indicator:

        Listen with respect to the ideas and views of others.

      • 7.2.b. Indicator:

        Demonstrate an understanding of the group's needs or goals.

      • 7.2.c. Indicator:

        Show respect and willingness to participate in group problem-solving activities while serving in variety of roles.

      • 7.2.d. Indicator:

        Recognize and use group dynamics.

      • 7.2.e. Indicator:

        Demonstrate the ability to resolve conflicts positively.

      • 7.2.f. Indicator:

        Use resources effectively.

      • 7.2.g. Indicator:

        Explain how the major groups in a capitalist economy are independent entrepreneurs, workers, and consumers.

      • 7.2.h. Indicator:

        Consider the opportunity costs of disagreements that arise from conflicting attitudes and socioeconomic conditions.

    • 7.3. Objective:

      Demonstrate an understanding of, and a reasoned commitment to, the rule of law.

      • 7.3.a. Indicator:

        Respect and defend individual rights and property.

      • 7.3.b. Indicator:

        Demonstrate individual economic responsibility.

      • 7.3.c. Indicator:

        Recognize how individual economic choices and actions affect self, family, and community.

      • 7.3.d. Indicator:

        Understand how an economic system can impose order on a society.

      • 7.3.e. Indicator:

        Evaluate the opportunities in a society in which people are allowed to communicate and to express different economic points of view.

      • 7.3.f. Indicator:

        Analyze the causes, effects, strengths, and problems of the free enterprise system.

      • 7.3.g. Indicator:

        Analyze historical and contemporary examples in which individuals demonstrated respect and support for the rights, responsibilities, and dignity of all people.

  • UT.1. Standard: Psychology

    Students will demonstrate through individual group processes a variety of creative, critical, causal, interpretive, and reflective thinking skills through observing, reading, writing, listening, speaking, and problem solving.

    • 1.1. Objective:

      Develop observation skills to foster inquiry in psychology.

      • 1.1.a. Indicator:

        Observe peoples' body language by charting or taking notes.

      • 1.1.b. Indicator:

        Compare the attitudes of siblings to one another and to other people.

    • 1.2. Objective:

      Develop writing skills in psychology.

      • 1.2.a. Indicator:

        Create and maintain a journal; e.g., ideas, impressions, memories.

      • 1.2.b. Indicator:

        Create an original paper showing the differences between the two major theories of personality.

      • 1.2.c. Indicator:

        Review daily newspapers and bimonthly magazines and write a summary of how each treats the discipline of psychology.

      • 1.2.d. Indicator:

        Identify a current problem in the treatment of a mood disorder.

    • 1.3. Objective:

      Develop reading skills in psychology.

      • 1.3.a. Indicator:

        Understand subject-appropriate vocabulary.

      • 1.3.b. Indicator:

        Define key words according to subject matter.

      • 1.3.c. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast a variety of written materials; e.g., magazines, newspapers, books, primary and secondary sources.

      • 1.3.d. Indicator:

        Analyze charts, graphs, and almanacs.

    • 1.4. Objective:

      Develop listening skills in psychology.

      • 1.4.a. Indicator:

        Find the main and supporting ideas from lectures, discussions, and forums.

      • 1.4.b. Indicator:

        Use visualization to assist in conceptualizing or problem solving.

    • 1.5. Objective:

      Develop speaking skills in psychology.

      • 1.5.a. Indicator:

        Participate in group discussions dealing with factors that influence personality.

      • 1.5.b. Indicator:

        Defend a psychologist's point of view when giving an oral presentation.

      • 1.5.c. Indicator:

        Participate in oral questions and examinations.

    • 1.6. Objective:

      Develop causal reasoning skills in the study of psychology.

      • 1.6.a. Indicator:

        Separate fact from fiction when dealing with certain psychological hypotheses.

      • 1.6.b. Indicator:

        Explain the pros and cons of psychological philosophies; e.g., Freud's ideas on dream analysis, Piaget's developmental theory, Pavlov's theory of conditioning, Maslov's theory of self-actualization.

      • 1.6.c. Indicator:

        Predict outcomes based on studies and/or surveys dealing with behavior.

    • 1.7. Objective:

      Develop critical analysis skills in psychology.

      • 1.7.a. Indicator:

        Determine the credibility of a source.

      • 1.7.b. Indicator:

        Analyze data on specific disorders in humans and animals.

      • 1.7.c. Indicator:

        Infer the motivation and bias of theorists in psychology; e.g., Skinner, Rogers, Maslow, Watson.

    • 1.8. Objective:

      Develop interpretive skills in psychology.

      • 1.8.a. Indicator:

        Compare, contrast, and analyze differing perceptions of theorists.

      • 1.8.b. Indicator:

        Identify mental disorders, causes and cures; e.g., obsessive-compulsive, panic disorders, eating disorders, depression, character disorders.

    • 1.9. Objective:

      Develop creative thinking in psychology.

      • 1.9.a. Indicator:

        Brainstorm strategies to discuss problems and potential solutions in today's world.

      • 1.9.b. Indicator:

        Explain how media influences thinking and behavior.

  • UT.2. Standard: Psychology

    Students will understand a comprehensive geographical view of the human and physical worlds and how and why they influence and relate to the environment, societies, and to global interconnectedness and interdependence.

    • 2.1. Objective:

      The student will be able to understand the impact of the human and physical environment on personality development.

      • 2.1.a. Indicator:

        Recognize communication styles, both globally and regionally.

      • 2.1.b. Indicator:

        Understand the effect that observational learning has on behavior; e.g., aggression, violence, age appropriate relationships, coping skills, grief and loss.

    • 2.2. Objective:

      Develop, plan, and evaluate alternative uses of environments and resources.

      • 2.2.a. Indicator:

        Understand the effect of temperature, altitude and pollution on behavior.

      • 2.2.b. Indicator:

        Analyze the effect of external stimulation on behavior; e.g., noise, crowding, traffic.

      • 2.2.c. Indicator:

        Recognize factors that contribute to suicide; e.g., culture, substance abuse, physical and emotional stress.

  • UT.3. Standard: Psychology

    Students will demonstrate why and how ideas, attitudes, events, people and documents have influenced the study of behavior over time.

    • 3.1. Objective:

      Identify and describe selected major trends or movements in the development of psychology.

      • 3.1.a. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast major schools of thought in psychology from 1800 to the present.

      • 3.1.b. Indicator:

        Evaluate the contributions of selected philosophers and psychologists to the field of psychology and how they have influenced thinking today.

    • 3.2. Objective:

      Examine the growth and development of the goals and methods of psychology.

      • 3.2.a. Indicator:

        Outline the four basic goals of psychology.

      • 3.2.b. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast different methods used in psychological research.

      • 3.2.c. Indicator:

        Explore the influence that culture, race, and gender of the researcher have on psychological research.

      • 3.2.d. Indicator:

        Evaluate the strengths and limitations of basic and applied research.

      • 3.2.e. Indicator:

        Articulate various ethical issues in psychological research.

      • 3.2.f. Indicator:

        Explain the guidelines governing treatment of research subjects, both human and non-human.

    • 3.3. Objective:

      Trace the development of specialty fields in psychology.

      • 3.3.a. Indicator:

        Describe various sub-areas of study in the field of psychology.

      • 3.3.b. Indicator:

        Gather information on various careers in psychology.

      • 3.3.c. Indicator:

        Investigate possible areas of expansion for using psychology to enhance our lives.

  • UT.4. Standard: Psychology

    Students will demonstrate why people in diverse societies create and adopt systems of government and how each addresses human rights and citizen responsibilities.

    • 4.1. Objective:

      Identify and examine persisting issues involving the rights, roles, and status of the individual in relation to society.

      • 4.1.a. Indicator:

        Describe the rights, roles and responsibilities of citizens in several world societies.

      • 4.1.b. Indicator:

        Evaluate the status of work force hierarchies; i.e., women, men, children, the disabled, elderly, minorities.

    • 4.2. Objective:

      Compare and contrast different political systems, their ideologies, institutions, processes, and political cultures as they pertain to psychology.

      • 4.2.a. Indicator:

        Debate 20th century issues relating to individual rights.

      • 4.2.b. Indicator:

        Examine the influence that political parties, election processes, taxes, and the media have on issues.

    • 4.3. Objective:

      Compare and contrast the ways individuals respond to conflict between forces of unity and forces of diversity.

      • 4.3.a. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast the positions of psychologists in various conflicts of the 20th century.

      • 4.3.b. Indicator:

        Evaluate the social and organizational effects of conflict using current examples in our state; e.g., smoking in public places, laws governing alcohol, separation of church and state, hosting the 2002 Olympics.

  • UT.5. Standard: Psychology

    Students will demonstrate why and how commonalities and differences of ideas, attitudes, choices, and technologies influence the interaction and behavior of individuals, groups, institutions, and cultures.

    • 5.1. Objective:

      Apply an understanding of human behavior that relates to traditions, beliefs, and behavioral patterns.

      • 5.1.a. Indicator:

        Identify several behaviors associated with local traditions.

      • 5.1.b. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast different socioeconomic levels in urban and rural areas.

    • 5.2. Objective:

      Identify and describe both current and historic examples of the interaction and interdependence of individuals and society in a variety of cultural settings.

      • 5.2.a. Indicator:

        Determine major influences made by historic and contemporary people in psychology.

      • 5.2.b. Indicator:

        Trace the evolution of how societies have perceived and treated mental illness.

      • 5.2.c. Indicator:

        Investigate and hypothesize behavioral challenges in the next decade.

      • 5.2.d. Indicator:

        Predict changes faced by individuals as a result of contact with others.

    • 5.3. Objective:

      Explain why human behavior responds to change in a particular way on the basis of shared assumptions, beliefs, and technologies.

      • 5.3.a. Indicator:

        Collect and organize information about ways people have dealt with change.

      • 5.3.b. Indicator:

        Evaluate technologies that are being used today in the study of human behavior.

      • 5.3.c. Indicator:

        Describe why responses to change differ based on points of view.

    • 5.4. Objective:

      Describe the various forms and roles institutions take in furthering both continuity and change.

      • 5.4.a. Indicator:

        Explain how institutions and organizations influence cultural values; e.g., media, family, school, religion, peer groups.

      • 5.4.b. Indicator:

        Collect and organize information about the roles institutions have played in furthering change in the treatment of mental illness.

  • UT.6. Standard: Psychology

    Students will demonstrate why societies organize available resources for the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.

    • 6.1. Objective:

      Evaluate economic benefits derived from psychological wellness.

      • 6.1.a. Indicator:

        Identify how positive coping strategies impact the work environment. Compare and contrast the economic significance positive and negative stress has on individuals.

      • 6.1.b. Indicator:

        Identify and provide a plan for the personal and economic cost of stressful incidents in one's life; e.g., death, divorce, violence, change of residence, illness.

    • 6.2. Objective:

      Describe and evaluate the economic impact of mental illness on society.

      • 6.2.a. Indicator:

        Describe the implications of mental illness on society; e.g., homelessness, abuse, crime, welfare.

      • 6.2.b. Indicator:

        Identify the economic impact of mental illness on the work force and productivity.

      • 6.2.c. Indicator:

        Calculate the cost of various treatments for mental illness; e.g., in-patient, out-patient, drug, electroshock.

  • UT.7. Standard: Psychology

    Students will demonstrate why and how lifelong learning, collaboration, and responsible citizenship are necessary to promote the personal and public good.

    • 7.1. Objective:

      Demonstrate the characteristics of lifelong learning in school activities.

      • 7.1.a. Indicator:

        Use appropriate strategies to identify and meet needs and goals.

      • 7.1.b. Indicator:

        Organize resources and time efficiently.

      • 7.1.c. Indicator:

        Explore the philosophical views of others.

      • 7.1.d. Indicator:

        Use the scientific method to test a hypothesis.

      • 7.1.e. Indicator:

        Understand how learning strategies facilitate individual learning.

    • 7.2. Objective:

      Demonstrate collaboration in working with others to achieve specified results.

      • 7.2.a. Indicator:

        Show respect for ideas, possessions, and work of self and others.

      • 7.2.b. Indicator:

        Describe why supporting and dissenting communication is important to scientific inquiry and a productive society.

      • 7.2.c. Indicator:

        Demonstrate understanding of a group's needs and goals.

      • 7.2.d. Indicator:

        Demonstrate respect and willingness to participate in problem-solving activities while serving in a variety of roles.

      • 7.2.e. Indicator:

        Resolve conflicts positively.

      • 7.2.f. Indicator:

        Use resources efficiently and effectively.

    • 7.3. Objective:

      Demonstrate an understanding of, and a reasoned commitment to, the rule of law.

      • 7.3.a. Indicator:

        Demonstrate respect for other humans, animals, and all living and non-living things.

      • 7.3.b. Indicator:

        Use contemporary and historical data to analyze cases in which human behavior demonstrates respect and support for the rights and dignity of people.

      • 7.3.c. Indicator:

        Explain the necessity for people to abide by rules and laws.

      • 7.3.d. Indicator:

        Classify rules and laws that impact society; e.g., family, school, community, nation.

      • 7.3.e. Indicator:

        Practice responsible citizenship.

  • UT.1. Standard: Sociology

    Students will demonstrate through individual and group processes a variety of creative, critical, causal, interpretive and reflective thinking skills through observing, reading, writing, listening, speaking, and problem solving.

    • 1.1. Objective:

      Develop observation skills to foster sociological inquiry.

      • 1.1.a. Indicator:

        Explain social interaction through the view of the participants, setting, and activity.

      • 1.1.b. Indicator:

        Explain the function(s) of social interaction.

    • 1.2. Objective:

      Develop sociological reading skills.

      • 1.2.a. Indicator:

        Define common terms used by sociologists.

      • 1.2.b. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast a variety of written materials, including both primary and secondary sources.

      • 1.2.c. Indicator:

        Interpret and synthesize information contained in textbooks and other instructional materials.

    • 1.3. Objective:

      Develop sociological writing skills.

      • 1.3.a. Indicator:

        Write an essay on a social issue, utilizing a thesis, supporting paragraphs, and a conclusion.

      • 1.3.b. Indicator:

        Write and document a research project on a sociological topic using multiple resources and mediums.

    • 1.4. Objective:

      Develop listening skills in sociology.

      • 1.4.a. Indicator:

        Identify the main and supporting ideas from a discussion or lecture.

      • 1.4.b. Indicator:

        Organize information into notes.

    • 1.5. Objective:

      Develop speaking skills in sociology.

      • 1.5.a. Indicator:

        Prepare and present an oral report on a social issue.

      • 1.5.b. Indicator:

        Participate in group discussion of a social issue.

    • 1.6. Objective:

      Develop causal reasoning skills in sociology.

      • 1.6.a. Indicator:

        Separate fact from opinion.

      • 1.6.b. Indicator:

        Recognize and describe bias.

      • 1.6.c. Indicator:

        Explain causal relationships.

      • 1.6.d. Indicator:

        Explain that events and actions may have both positive and negative consequences.

      • 1.6.e. Indicator:

        Predict an outcome based on a given scenario.

    • 1.7. Objective:

      Develop critical analysis skills in sociology.

      • 1.7.a. Indicator:

        Analyze the importance of collecting sociological data.

      • 1.7.b. Indicator:

        Infer the motivations and biases of noted sociologists in their social and historical contexts.

      • 1.7.c. Indicator:

        Collect and categorize data about a specific social phenomenon.

      • 1.7.d. Indicator:

        Compare, contrast, and analyze differing perceptions.

    • 1.8. Objective:

      Develop creative thinking skills in sociology.

      • 1.8.a. Indicator:

        Use brainstorming strategies to discuss problems and potential solutions.

      • 1.8.b. Indicator:

        Develop solutions and predict outcomes to a current sociological problem based on data collected from a variety of sources.

  • UT.2. Standard: Sociology

    Students will understand a comprehensive geographical view of the human and physical worlds and why and how they influence and relate to the environment, societies, and to global interconnectedness and interdependence.

    • 2.1. Objective:

      Describe sociology as a unique discipline within the social sciences.

      • 2.1.a. Indicator:

        Distinguish sociology from other social sciences; i.e., anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology.

      • 2.1.b. Indicator:

        Explain how social institutions and situations influence individual behaviors from a sociological perspective.

    • 2.2. Objective:

      Develop and practice methodological techniques, including the scientific method.

      • 2.2.a. Indicator:

        Conduct an experiment on a hypothetical or real social situation using the scientific method.

      • 2.2.b. Indicator:

        Employ a variety of approaches in the examination of world social problems; e.g., participant observation, survey, historical analysis, and case study.

    • 2.3. Objective:

      Compare and distinguish between theoretical perspectives as they relate to the physical and social environment.

      • 2.3.a. Indicator:

        Identify and compare classical and contemporary theoretical approaches to sociology; e.g., Comte, Durkheim, Marx, Weber, Mills.

      • 2.3.b. Indicator:

        Apply one or more sociological theories to a contemporary social problem using one of the five themes of geography.

  • UT.3. Standard: Sociology

    Students will demonstrate why and how ideas, attitudes, events, persons, movements, and documents have influenced humanity.

    • 3.1. Objective:

      Define culture and recognize the characteristics of culture.

      • 3.1.a. Indicator:

        Recognize nonmaterial, material, and symbolic cultural traits.

      • 3.1.b. Indicator:

        Describe how cultural components of language, time and space, norms and values form the basis of a unique culture.

      • 3.1.c. Indicator:

        Recognize the roles of archeologists and ethnologists.

      • 3.1.d. Indicator:

        Discuss the processes of cultural transmission.

    • 3.2. Objective:

      Compare a variety of different cultures.

      • 3.2.a. Indicator:

        Demonstrate a knowledge of other cultures.

      • 3.2.b. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast the concepts of ethnocentrism and cultural relativity.

      • 3.2.c. Indicator:

        Define and identify subcultures; e.g., hippies, gangs, Mexican Americans, Mennonites.

      • 3.2.d. Indicator:

        Analyze fashion and fads.

    • 3.3. Objective:

      Understand the factors which promote and inhibit cultural diffusion.

      • 3.3.a. Indicator:

        Explain how population growth and movement change a culture.

      • 3.3.b. Indicator:

        Describe how war, technology, environment, and other factors effect cultural diffusion.

      • 3.3.c. Indicator:

        Explain how the vested interests of a culture effect cultural change.

  • UT.4. Standard: Sociology

    Students will demonstrate why people in different societies create and adopt systems of government and how each addresses human needs, rights, and citizen responsibilities.

    • 4.1. Objective:

      Determine what elements must be present for a society to exist.

      • 4.1.a. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast American society with other societies.

      • 4.1.b. Indicator:

        Describe changes and differences in American society from 1700 to the present.

    • 4.2. Objective:

      Describe the basic types of social organizations and social structures in the United States.

      • 4.2.a. Indicator:

        Explain the differences among primary groups, secondary groups, aggregates, and categories.

      • 4.2.b. Indicator:

        Discuss the impact and relationship of reference groups on a group's dynamics.

      • 4.2.c. Indicator:

        Distinguish between in-groups and out-groups.

      • 4.2.d. Indicator:

        Identify types of formal organizations.

      • 4.2.e. Indicator:

        Identify the primary characteristics of a bureaucracy.

      • 4.2.f. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast groups on the basis of their respective activities; e.g., power/authority, norms, criteria for membership, communication.

    • 4.3. Objective:

      Identify and explain the major social institutions of society.

      • 4.3.a. Indicator:

        State the purposes and social activities associated with family, education, government, and religion.

      • 4.3.b. Indicator:

        Distinguish between various philosophies, forms, and practices associated with the family institution; e.g., nuclear, extended, matriarchal, patriarchal.

      • 4.3.c. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast various philosophies, forms, and practices associated with educational institutions; e.g., public, private, parochial, alternative.

      • 4.3.d. Indicator:

        Evaluate various philosophies, forms, and practices associated with governmental institutions; e.g., authoritarian, totalitarian, monarchical, democratic.

      • 4.3.e. Indicator:

        Distinguish between various philosophies, forms, and practices associated with economic institutions; e.g., preindustrial and contemporary market, centrally-planned and alternative.

      • 4.3.f. Indicator:

        Distinguish between various philosophies, forms, and practices associated with religious institutions; e.g., Buddhist, Christian, Islamic, Jewish.

    • 4.4. Objective:

      Explain the process of socialization.

      • 4.4.a. Indicator:

        Explain the nature v. nurture concept regarding socialization.

      • 4.4.b. Indicator:

        Describe the effects of social isolation on humans and other primates.

      • 4.4.c. Indicator:

        Identify the agents of socialization; e.g., family, schools, peer groups, mass media, social structures.

      • 4.4.d. Indicator:

        Examine the influence of status and roles on the development of individuals.

      • 4.4.e. Indicator:

        Describe the effect of social norms and values on human behavior.

      • 4.4.f. Indicator:

        Discuss key theories of socialization; e.g., Sigmund Freud's model of personality, Jean Piaget's cognitive development, George H. Mead's social self.

      • 4.4.g. Indicator:

        Compare and contrast the modes of socialization in childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and old age.

      • 4.4.h. Indicator:

        Cite personal observations related to the socialization process.

      • 4.4.i. Indicator:

        Examine different applications of resocialization.

  • UT.5. Standard: Sociology

    Students will demonstrate why and how commonalities and differences of ideas, attitudes, choices, and technologies influence the interaction and behavior of individuals, groups, institutions, and cultures.

    • 5.1. Objective:

      Analyze the causes and effects of discrimination, prejudice and racism.

      • 5.1.a. Indicator:

        Discuss the impact of racial and/or ethnic discrimination within the United States and other countries.

      • 5.1.b. Indicator:

        Discuss explanations for the onset of discrimination; e.g., labeling, stereotyping, ethnocentrism, scapegoating.

      • 5.1.c. Indicator: Describe how and why institutions and individuals apply the following

        assimilation, accommodation, discrimination, and genocide.

    • 5.2. Objective:

      Analyze gender discrimination.

      • 5.2.a. Indicator:

        Observe and relate examples of gender bias and discrimination within the United States and other countries.

      • 5.2.b. Indicator:

        Explain the origins and consequences of gender discrimination within different cultural contexts.

      • 5.2.c. Indicator:

        Discuss solutions to gender-based social problems.

    • 5.3. Objective:

      Analyze social inequality based upon class stratification.

      • 5.3.a Indicator:

        Compare examples of class stratification within the United States and other countries.

      • 5.3.b. Indicator:

        Explain the origins and consequences of class stratification in the United States and other countries; e.g., the caste system in India, apartheid in South Africa, worldwide homelessness.

      • 5.3.c. Indicator:

        Develop solutions to a class stratification-based social problem; e.g., caste, poverty, sexual harassment.

    • 5.4. Objective:

      Analyze additional forms of social inequity.

      • 5.4.a. Indicator:

        Observe and relate examples of social inequity; e.g., age, economics, disability.

      • 5.4.b. Indicator:

        Discuss how individuals have assisted minority groups to gain status and affect social change; e.g., Caesar Chavez, Martin Luther King, Eleanor Roosevelt, Sitting Bull.

      • 5.4.c. Indicator:

        Identify and describe how individuals and groups rationalize social inequities.

  • UT.6. Standard: Sociology

    Students will demonstrate why societies organize available resources for the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.

    • 6.1. Objective:

      Investigate poverty, crime, conflict and other relevant social problems.

      • 6.1.a. Indicator:

        Describe why and how a particular economic issue constitutes a social problem; e.g., poverty, wealth, health care.

      • 6.1.b. Indicator: Examine social problems from different economic conditions

        welfare, middle-class, affluent.

    • 6.2. Objective:

      Consider various sociological methods in resolving economic problems.

      • 6.2.a. Indicator:

        Discuss solutions to past, present, and future economic problems.

      • 6.2.b. Indicator:

        Synthesize historical and contemporary sociological principles as they apply to the resolution of a socioeconomic problem; e.g. homelessness, school dropouts, unemployed.

  • UT.7. Standard: Sociology

    Students will demonstrate why and how lifelong learning, collaboration, and responsible citizenship are necessary to promote the personal and public good.

    • 7.1. Objective:

      Demonstrate the characteristics of lifelong learning in school activities.

      • 7.1.a. Indicator:

        Use appropriate strategies to identify and meet needs and goals.

      • 7.1.b. Indicator:

        Organize resources and time efficiently.

      • 7.1.c. Indicator:

        Explore the three major theories of social change and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each theory.

      • 7.1.d. Indicator:

        Recognize the importance of social movements in fostering or inhibiting social change.

      • 7.1.e. Indicator:

        Investigate career opportunities in sociology and social work.

    • 7.2. Objective:

      Demonstrate collaboration in working with others to achieve specified results.

      • 7.2.a. Indicator:

        Listen with respect to the ideas, beliefs, and views of others.

      • 7.2.b. Indicator:

        Demonstrate an understanding of a group's needs or goals.

      • 7.2.c. Indicator:

        Show respect and willingness to participate in problem-solving activities while serving in a variety of roles.

      • 7.2.d. Indicator:

        Resolve conflicts positively.

      • 7.2.e. Indicator:

        Use resources effectively.

      • 7.2.f. Indicator:

        Distinguish between social movements and collective behavior.

      • 7.2.g. Indicator:

        Understand the role of the media in influencing social change.

    • 7.3. Objective:

      Demonstrate an understanding of, and a reasoned commitment to, the rule of law.

      • 7.3.a. Indicator:

        Respect individual rights and property.

      • 7.3.b. Indicator:

        Demonstrate individual responsibility.

      • 7.3.c. Indicator:

        Recognize how individual and social decisions affect self, family, and community.

      • 7.3.d. Indicator:

        Recognize how fashion, fads, media, and advertising can affect social actions and decisions.

      • 7.3.e. Indicator:

        Analyze historical and contemporary examples of social change and determine whether they were positive or negative.

      • 7.3.f. Indicator:

        Identify individuals who have demonstrated respect and support for the rights, responsibilities, and dignity of people or social groups.

 
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