Teaching Materials
Ask a Master Teacher
Lesson Plan Gateway
Lesson Plan Reviews
State Standards
Teaching Guides
Digital Classroom
Ask a Digital Historian
Tech for Teachers
Beyond the Chalkboard
History Content
Ask a Historian
Beyond the Textbook
History Content Gateway
History in Multimedia
Museums and Historic Sites
National Resources
Quiz
Website Reviews
Issues and Research
Report on the State of History Education
Research Briefs
Roundtables
Best Practices
Examples of Historical Thinking
Teaching in Action
Teaching with Textbooks
Using Primary Sources
TAH Projects
Lessons Learned
Project Directors Conference
Project Spotlight
TAH Projects
About
Staff
Partners
Technical Working Group
Research Advisors
Teacher Representatives
Privacy
Quiz Rules
Blog
Outreach
Teaching History.org logo and contact info

Texas: Kindergarten Standards

ß113.11. Social Studies, Kindergarten, Beginning with School Year 2011-2012

Introduction

  1. In Kindergarten, the study of the self, home, family, and classroom establishes the foundation for responsible citizenship in society. Students explore state and national heritage by examining the celebration of patriotic holidays and the contributions of individuals. The concept of chronology is introduced. Students apply geographic concepts of location and physical and human characteristics of place. Students identify basic human needs and ways people meet these needs. Students learn the purpose of rules and the role of authority figures in the home and school. Students learn customs, symbols, and celebrations that represent American beliefs and principles and contribute to our national identity. Students compare family customs and traditions and describe examples of technology in the home and school. Students acquire information from a variety of oral and visual sources. Students practice problem-solving, decision-making, and independent-thinking skills.
  2. To support the teaching of the essential knowledge and skills, the use of a variety of rich material is encouraged. Motivating resources are available from museums, historical sites, presidential libraries, and local and state preservation societies.
  3. The eight strands of the essential knowledge and skills for social studies are intended to be integrated for instructional purposes. Skills listed in the social studies skills strand in subsection (b) of this section should be incorporated into the teaching of all essential knowledge and skills for social studies. A greater depth of understanding of complex content material can be attained when integrated social studies content from the various disciplines and critical-thinking skills are taught together. Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.
  4. Students identify the role of the U.S. free enterprise system within the parameters of this course and understand that this system may also be referenced as capitalism or the free market system.
  5. Throughout social studies in Kindergarten-Grade 12, students build a foundation in history; geography; economics; government; citizenship; culture; science, technology, and society; and social studies skills. The content, as appropriate for the grade level or course, enables students to understand the importance of patriotism, function in a free enterprise society, and appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nation as referenced in the Texas Education Code (TEC), ß28.002(h).
  6. Students understand that a constitutional republic is a representative form of government whose representatives derive their authority from the consent of the governed, serve for an established tenure, and are sworn to uphold the constitution.
  7. Students must demonstrate learning performance related to any federal and state mandates regarding classroom instruction. Although Kindergarten is not required to participate in Celebrate Freedom Week, according to the TEC, ß29.907, primary grades lay the foundation for subsequent learning. As a result, Kindergarten Texas essential knowledge and skills include standards related to this patriotic observance.
  8. Students identify and discuss how the actions of U.S. citizens and the local, state, and federal governments have either met or failed to meet the ideals espoused in the founding documents.

Knowledge and skills

  1. History:
    The student understands that holidays are celebrations of special events. The student is expected to:
    • a. explain the reasons for national patriotic holidays such as Presidents' Day, Veterans Day, and Independence Day; and
    • b. identify customs associated with national patriotic holidays such as parades and fireworks on Independence Day.
  2. History:
    The student understands how historical figures, patriots, and good citizens helped shape the community, state, and nation. The student is expected to:
    • a. identify contributions of historical figures, including Stephen F. Austin, George Washington, Christopher Columbus, and JosÈ Antonio Navarro, who helped to shape the state and nation; and
    • b. identify contributions of patriots and good citizens who have shaped the community.
  3. History.
    The student understands the concept of chronology. The student is expected to:
    • a. place events in chronological order; and
    • b. use vocabulary related to time and chronology, including before, after, next, first, last, yesterday, today, and tomorrow.
  4. Geography.
    The student understands the concept of location. The student is expected to:
    • a. use terms, including over, under, near, far, left, and right, to describe relative location;
    • b. locate places on the school campus and describe their relative locations; and
    • c. identify tools that aid in determining location, including maps and globes.
  5. Geography.
    The student understands physical and human characteristics of place. The student is expected to:
    • a. identify the physical characteristics of place such as landforms, bodies of water, natural resources, and weather; and
    • b. identify how the human characteristics of place such as ways of earning a living, shelter, clothing, food, and activities are based upon geographic location.
  6. Economics.
    The student understands that basic human needs and wants are met in many ways. The student is expected to:
    • a. identify basic human needs of food, clothing, and shelter;
    • b. explain the difference between needs and wants; and
    • c. explain how basic human needs can be met such as through self-producing, purchasing, and trading.
  7. Economics.
    The student understands the value of jobs. The student is expected to:
    • a. identify jobs in the home, school, and community; and
    • b. explain why people have jobs.
  8. Government.
    The student understands the purpose of rules. The student is expected to:
    • a. identify purposes for having rules; and
    • b. identify rules that provide order, security, and safety in the home and school.
  9. Government.
    The student understands the role of authority figures. The student is expected to:
    • a. identify authority figures in the home, school, and community; and
    • b. explain how authority figures make and enforce rules.
  10. Citizenship.
    The student understands important symbols, customs, and responsibilities that represent American beliefs and principles and contribute to our national identity. The student is expected to:
    • a. identify the flags of the United States and Texas;
    • b. recite the Pledge of Allegiance to the United States Flag and the Pledge to the Texas Flag;
    • c. identify Constitution Day as a celebration of American freedom; and
    • d. use voting as a method for group decision making.
  11. Culture.
    The student understands similarities and differences among people. The student is expected to:
    • a. identify similarities and differences among people such as kinship, laws, and religion; and
    • b. identify similarities and differences among people such as music, clothing, and food.
  12. Culture.
    The student understands the importance of family customs and traditions. The student is expected to:
    • a. describe and explain the importance of family customs and traditions; and
    • b. compare family customs and traditions.
  13. Science, technology, and society.
    The student understands ways technology is used in the home and school and how technology affects people's lives. The student is expected to:
    • a. identify examples of technology used in the home and school;
    • b. describe how technology helps accomplish specific tasks and meet people's needs; and
    • c. describe how his or her life might be different without modern technology.
  14. Social studies skills.
    The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:
    • a. obtain information about a topic using a variety of valid oral sources such as conversations, interviews, and music;
    • b. obtain information about a topic using a variety of valid visual sources such as pictures, symbols, electronic media, print material, and artifacts; and
    • c. sequence and categorize information.
  15. Social studies skills.
    The student communicates in oral and visual forms. The student is expected to:
    • a. express ideas orally based on knowledge and experiences; and
    • b. create and interpret visuals, including pictures and maps.
  16. Social studies skills.
    The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:
    • a. use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and
    • b. use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, generate options, predict outcomes, take action to implement a decision, and reflect on the effectiveness of the decision.
 
Content