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South Carolina's Eleventh Grade Standards

SC.USHC-1. Standard / Course—United States History and the Constitution

(Usually taught at the eleventh grade) The student will demonstrate an understanding of the conflicts between regional and national interest in the development of democracy in the United States.

  • USHC-1.1. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

    Summarize the distinct characteristics of each colonial region in the settlement and development of British North America, including religious, social, political, and economic differences.

  • USHC-1.2. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

    Analyze the early development of representative government and political rights in the American colonies, including the influence of the British political system and the rule of law as written in the Magna Carta and the English Bill of Rights, and the conflict between the colonial legislatures and the British Parliament over the right to tax that resulted in the American Revolutionary War.

  • USHC-1.3. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

    Analyze the impact of the Declaration of Independence and the American Revolution on establishing the ideals of a democratic republic.

  • USHC-1.4. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

    Analyze how dissatisfactions with the government under the Articles of Confederation were addressed with the writing of the Constitution of 1787, including the debates and compromises reached at the Philadelphia Convention and the ratification of the Constitution.

  • USHC-1.5. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

    Explain how the fundamental principle of limited government is protected by the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, including democracy, republicanism, federalism, the separation of powers, the system of checks and balances, and individual rights.

  • USHC-1.6. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

    Analyze the development of the two-party system during the presidency of George Washington, including controversies over domestic and foreign policies and the regional interests of the Democratic-Republicans and the Federalists.

  • USHC-1.7. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

    Summarize the expansion of the power of the national government as a result of Supreme Court decisions under Chief Justice John Marshall, such as the establishment of judicial review in Marbury v. Madison and the impact of political party affiliation on the Court.

  • Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century:

    1. Analyze and draw conclusions about the locations of places, the conditions at places, and the connections between places.
    2. Examine the relationship of the present to the past and use knowledge of the past to make informed decisions in the present and to extrapolate into the future.
    3. Trace and describe continuity and change across cultures.
    4. Analyze, interpret, and synthesize social studies resources to make inferences and draw conclusions.(USHC-1)
    5. Explain how groups work to challenge traditional institutions and effect change to promote the needs and interests of society.
    6. Create a thesis supported by research to convince an audience of its validity.
    (USHC-1)Social studies resources include the following: texts, calendars, timelines, maps, mental maps, charts, tables, graphs, flow charts, diagrams, photographs, illustrations, paintings, cartoons, architectural drawings, documents, letters, censuses, artifacts, models, geographic models, aerial photographs, satellite-produced images, and geographic information systems.
  • SC.USHC-2. Standard / Course—United States History and the Constitution

    (Usually taught at the eleventh grade) The student will demonstrate an understanding of how economic developments and the westward movement impacted regional differences and democracy in the early nineteenth century.

    • USHC-2.1. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Summarize the impact of the westward movement on nationalism and democracy, including the expansion of the franchise, the displacement of Native Americans from the southeast and conflicts over states’ rights and federal power during the era of Jacksonian democracy as the result of major land acquisitions such as the Louisiana Purchase, the Oregon Treaty, and the Mexican Cession.

    • USHC-2.2. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Explain how the Monroe Doctrine and the concept of Manifest Destiny affected the United States’ relationships with foreign powers, including the role of the United States in the Texan Revolution and the Mexican War..

    • USHC-2.3. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Compare the economic development in different regions (the South, the North, and the West) of the United States during the early nineteenth century, including ways that economic policy contributed to political controversies.

    • USHC-2.4. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Compare the social and cultural characteristics of the North, the South, and the West during the antebellum period, including the lives of African Americans and social reform movements such as abolition and women’s rights.

    • Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century:

      1. Assess the relative importance of multiple causes on outcomes.
      2. Represent and interpret Earth’s physical and human systems by using maps, mental maps, geographic models, and other social studies resources to make inferences and draw conclusions.(USHC-2)
      3. Compare the ways that different economic systems answer the fundamental questions of what goods and services should be produced, how they should be produced, and who will consume them.
      4. Analyze, interpret, and synthesize social studies resources to make inferences and draw conclusions.(USHC-2)
      5. Create a thesis supported by research to convince an audience of its validity.
      (USHC-2)Social studies resources include the following: texts, calendars, timelines, maps, mental maps, charts, tables, graphs, flow charts, diagrams, photographs, illustrations, paintings, cartoons, architectural drawings, documents, letters, censuses, artifacts, models, geographic models, aerial photographs, satellite-produced images, and geographic information systems.
  • SC.USHC-3. Standard / Course—United States History and the Constitution

    (Usually taught at the eleventh grade) The student will demonstrate an understanding of how regional and ideological differences led to the Civil War and an understanding of the impact of the Civil War and Reconstruction on democracy in America.

    • USHC-3.1. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Evaluate the relative importance of political events and issues that divided the nation and led to civil war, including the compromises reached to maintain the balance of free and slave states, the abolitionist movement, the Dred Scott case, conflicting views on states’ rights and federal authority, the emergence of the Republican Party, and the formation of the Confederate States of America.

    • USHC-3.2. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Summarize the course of the Civil War and its impact on democracy, including the major turning points; the impact of the Emancipation Proclamation; the unequal treatment afforded to African American military units; the geographic, economic, and political factors in the defeat of the Confederacy; and the ultimate defeat of the idea of secession.

    • USHC-3.3. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Analyze the effects of Reconstruction on the southern states and on the role of the federal government, including the impact of the thirteenth, fourteenth, and fifteenth amendments on opportunities for African Americans.

    • USHC-3.4. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Summarize the end of Reconstruction, including the role of anti–African American factions and competing national interests in undermining support for Reconstruction; the impact of the removal of federal protection for freedmen; and the impact of Jim Crow laws and voter restrictions on African American rights in the post-Reconstruction era.

    • USHC-3.5. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Evaluate the varied responses of African Americans to the restrictions imposed on them in the post-Reconstruction period, including the leadership and strategies of Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. DuBois, and Ida B. Wells-Barnett.

    • Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century:

      1. Examine the relationship of the present to the past and use a knowledge of the past to make informed decisions in the present and to extrapolate into the future.
      2. Assess the relative importance of multiple causes on outcomes.
      3. Analyze, interpret, and synthesize social studies resources to make inferences and draw conclusions.(USHC-3)
      4. Analyze and draw conclusions about the locations of places, the conditions at places, and the connections between places.
      5. Explain contemporary patterns of human behavior, culture, and political and economic systems.
      6. Explain how groups work to challenge traditional institutions and effect change to promote the needs and interests of society.
      7. Create a thesis supported by research to convince an audience of its validity.
      (USHC-3)Social studies resources include the following: texts, calendars, timelines, maps, mental maps, charts, tables, graphs, flow charts, diagrams, photographs, illustrations, paintings, cartoons, architectural drawings, documents, letters, censuses, artifacts, models, geographic models, aerial photographs, satellite-produced images, and geographic information systems.
  • SC.USHC-4. Standard / Course—United States History and the Constitution

    (Usually taught at the eleventh grade) The student will demonstrate an understanding of the industrial development and the consequences of that development on society and politics during the second half of the nineteenth and the early twentieth centuries.

    • USHC-4.1. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Summarize the impact that government policy and the construction of the transcontinental railroads had on the development of the national market and on the culture of Native American peoples.

    • USHC-4.2. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Analyze the factors that influenced the economic growth of the United States and its emergence as an industrial power, including the abundance of natural resources; government support and protection in the form of railroad subsidies, tariffs, and labor policies; and the expansion of international markets.

    • USHC-4.3. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Evaluate the role of capitalism and its impact on democracy, including the ascent of new industries, the increasing availability of consumer goods and the rising standard of living, the role of entrepreneurs, the rise of business through monopoly and the influence of business ideologies.

    • USHC-4.4. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Explain the impact of industrial growth and business cycles on farmers, workers, immigrants, labor unions, and the Populist movement and the ways that these groups and the government responded to the economic problems caused by industry and business.

    • USHC-4.5. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Explain the causes and effects of urbanization in late nineteenth-century America, including the movement from farm to city, the changing immigration patterns, the rise of ethnic neighborhoods, the role of political machines, and the migration of African Americans to the North, Midwest, and West.

    • USHC-4.6. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Compare the accomplishments and limitations of the women’s suffrage movement and the Progressive Movement in affecting social and political reforms in America, including the roles of the media and of reformers such as Carrie Chapman Catt, Alice Paul, Jane Addams, and presidents Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson.

    • Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century:

      1. Examine the relationship of the present to the past and use a knowledge of the past to make informed decisions in the present and to extrapolate into the future.
      2. Assess the relative importance of multiple causes on outcomes.
      3. Analyze how a scarcity of productive resources affects economic choice.
      4. Analyze the role of government in promoting entrepreneurial activity.
      5. Analyze, interpret, and synthesize social studies resources to make inferences and draw conclusions.(USHC-4)
      6. Explain how groups work to challenge traditional institutions and effect change to promote the needs and interests of society.
      7. Create a thesis supported by research to convince an audience of its validity.
      (USHC-4)Social studies resources include the following: texts, calendars, timelines, maps, mental maps, charts, tables, graphs, flow charts, diagrams, photographs, illustrations, paintings, cartoons, architectural drawings, documents, letters, censuses, artifacts, models, geographic models, aerial photographs, satellite-produced images, and geographic information systems.
  • SC.USHC-5. Standard / Course—United States History and the Constitution

    (Usually taught at the eleventh grade) The student will demonstrate an understanding of domestic and foreign developments that contributed to the emergence of the United States as a world power in the twentieth century.

    • USHC-5.1. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Analyze the development of American expansionism, including the change from isolationism to intervention and the rationales for imperialism based on Social Darwinism, expanding capitalism, and domestic tensions.

    • USHC-5.2. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Explain the influence of the Spanish-American War on the emergence of the United States as a world power, including the role of yellow journalism in the American declaration of war against Spain, United States interests and expansion in the South Pacific, and the debate between pro- and anti-imperialists over annexation of the Philippines.

    • USHC-5.3. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Summarize United States foreign policies in different regions of the world during the early twentieth century, including the purposes and effects of the Open Door policy with China, the United States role in the Panama Revolution, Theodore Roosevelt’s “big stick diplomacy,” William Taft’s “dollar diplomacy,” and Woodrow Wilson’s “moral diplomacy” and changing worldwide perceptions of the United States.

    • USHC-5.4. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Analyze the causes and consequences of United States involvement in World War I, including the failure of neutrality and the reasons for the declaration of war, the role of propaganda in creating a unified war effort, the limitation of individual liberties, and Woodrow Wilson’s leadership in the Treaty of Versailles and the creation of the League of Nations.

    • USHC-5.5. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Analyze the United States rejection of internationalism, including postwar disillusionment, the Senate’s refusal to ratify the Versailles Treaty, the election of 1920, and the role of the United States in international affairs in the 1920s.

    • Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century:

      1. Examine the relationship of the present to the past and use a knowledge of the past to make informed decisions in the present and to extrapolate into the future.
      2. Assess the relative importance of multiple causes on outcomes.
      3. Analyze, interpret, and synthesize social studies resources to make inferences and draw conclusions.(USHC-5)
      4. Represent and interpret Earth’s physical and human systems by using maps, mental maps, geographic models, and other social studies resources to make inferences and draw conclusions.(USHC-5)
      5. Explain how an interdependent, specialized, and voluntary worldwide trade network affects standards of living and economic growth.
      6. Create a thesis supported by research to convince an audience of its validity.
      (USHC-5)Social studies resources include the following: texts, calendars, timelines, maps, mental maps, charts, tables, graphs, flow charts, diagrams, photographs, illustrations, paintings, cartoons, architectural drawings, documents, letters, censuses, artifacts, models, geographic models, aerial photographs, satellite-produced images, and geographic information systems.
  • SC.USHC-6. Standard / Course—United States History and the Constitution

    (Usually taught at the eleventh grade) The student will demonstrate an understanding of the conflict between traditionalism and progressivism in the 1920s and the economic collapse and the political response to the economic crisis in the 1930s.

    • USHC-6.1. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Explain the impact of the changes in the 1920s on the economy, society, and culture, including the expansion of mass production techniques, the invention of new home appliances, the introduction of the installment plan, the role of transportation in changing urban life, the effect of radio and movies in creating a national mass culture, and the cultural changes exemplified by the Harlem Renaissance.

    • USHC-6.2. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Explain the causes and effects of the social change and conflict between traditional and modern culture that took place during the 1920s, including the role of women, the “Red Scare”, the resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan, immigration quotas, Prohibition, and the Scopes trial.

    • USHC-6.3. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Explain the causes and consequences of the Great Depression, including the disparities in income and wealth distribution; the collapse of the farm economy and the effects of the Dust Bowl; limited governmental regulation; taxes, investment; and stock market speculation; policies of the federal government and the Federal Reserve System; and the effects of the Depression on the people.

    • USHC-6.4. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Analyze President Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal as a response to the economic crisis of the Great Depression, including the effectiveness of New Deal programs in relieving suffering and achieving economic recovery, in protecting the rights of women and minorities, and in making significant reforms to protect the economy such as Social Security and labor laws.

    • Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century:

      1. Examine the relationship of the present to the past and use a knowledge of the past to make informed decisions in the present and to extrapolate into the future.
      2. Assess the relative importance of multiple causes on outcomes.
      3. Analyze how a scarcity of productive resources affects economic choices.
      4. Analyze the role of fiscal and regulatory policies in a mixed economy.
      5. Explain how the United States government provides public services, redistributes income, regulates economic activity, and promotes economic growth.
      6. CExplain contemporary patterns of human behavior, culture, and political and economic systems.
      7. Analyze, interpret, and synthesize social studies resources to make inferences and draw conclusions.(USHC-6)
      (USHC-6)Social studies resources include the following: texts, calendars, timelines, maps, mental maps, charts, tables, graphs, flow charts, diagrams, photographs, illustrations, paintings, cartoons, architectural drawings, documents, letters, censuses, artifacts, models, geographic models, aerial photographs, satellite-produced images, and geographic information systems.
  • SC.USHC-7. Standard / Course—United States History and the Constitution

    (Usually taught at the eleventh grade) The student will demonstrate an understanding of the impact of World War II on the United States and the nation’s subsequent role in the world.

    • USHC-7.1. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Analyze the decision of the United States to enter World War II, including the nation’s movement from a policy of isolationism to international involvement and the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

    • USHC-7.2. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Evaluate the impact of war mobilization on the home front, including consumer sacrifices, the role of women and minorities in the workforce, and limits on individual rights that resulted in the internment of Japanese Americans.

    • USHC-7.3. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Explain how controversies among the Big Three Allied leaders over war strategies led to post-war conflict between the United States and the USSR, including delays in the opening of the second front in Europe, the participation of the Soviet Union in the war in the Pacific, and the dropping of atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    • USHC-7.4. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Summarize the economic, humanitarian, and diplomatic effects of World War II, including the end of the Great Depression, the Holocaust, the war crimes trials, and the creation of Israel.

    • USHC-7.5. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Analyze the impact of the Cold War on national security and individual freedom, including the containment policy and the role of military alliances, the effects of the “Red Scare” and McCarthyism, the conflicts in Korea and the Middle East, the Iron Curtain and the Berlin Wall, the Cuban missile crisis, and the nuclear arms race.

    • USHC-7.6. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Analyze the causes and consequences of social and cultural changes in postwar America, including educational programs, the consumer culture and expanding suburbanization, the advances in medical and agricultural technology that led to changes in the standard of living and demographic patterns, and the roles of women in American society.

    • Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century:

      1. Examine the relationship of the present to the past and use a knowledge of the past to make informed decisions in the present and to extrapolate into the future.
      2. Assess the relative importance of multiple causes on outcomes.
      3. Analyze, interpret, and synthesize social studies resources to make inferences and draw conclusions.(USHC-7)
      (USHC-7)Social studies resources include the following: texts, calendars, timelines, maps, mental maps, charts, tables, graphs, flow charts, diagrams, photographs, illustrations, paintings, cartoons, architectural drawings, documents, letters, censuses, artifacts, models, geographic models, aerial photographs, satellite-produced images, and geographic information systems.
  • SC.USHC-8. Standard / Course—United States History and the Constitution

    (Usually taught at the eleventh grade) The student will demonstrate an understanding of social, economic and political issues in contemporary America.

    • USHC-8.1. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Analyze the African American Civil Rights Movement, including initial strategies, landmark court cases and legislation, the roles of key civil rights advocates and the media, and the influence of the Civil Rights Movement on other groups seeking equality.

    • USHC-8.2. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Compare the social and economic policies of presidents Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon, including support for civil rights legislation, programs for the elderly and the poor, environmental protection, and the impact of these policies on politics.

    • USHC-8.3. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Explain the development of the war in Vietnam and its impact on American government and politics, including the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution and the policies of the Johnson administration, protests and opposition to the war, the role of the media, the policies of the Nixon administration, and the growing credibility gap that culminated in the Watergate scandal.

    • USHC-8.4. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Analyze the causes and consequences of the resurgence of the conservative movement, including social and cultural changes of the 1960s and 1970s, Supreme Court decisions on integration and abortion, the economic and social policies of the Reagan administration, and the role of the media.

    • USHC-8.5. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Summarize key political and economic issues of the last twenty-five years, including continuing dependence on foreign oil; trade agreements and globalization; health and education reforms; increases in economic disparity and recession; tax policy; the national surplus, debt, and deficits; immigration; presidential resignation/impeachment; and the elections of 2000 and 2008.

    • USHC-8.6. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Summarize America’s role in the changing world, including the dissolution of the Soviet Union, the expansion of the European Union, the continuing crisis in the Middle East, and the rise of global terrorism.

    • Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century:

      1. Examine the relationship of the present to the past and use a knowledge of the past to make informed decisions in the present and to extrapolate into the future.
      2. Analyze, interpret, and synthesize social studies resources to make inferences and draw conclusions.(USHC-8)
      3. Explain how groups work to challenge traditional institutions and effect change to promote the needs and interests of society.
      4. Explain how the United States government provides public services, redistributes income, regulates economic activity, and promotes economic growth.
      (USHC-8)Social studies resources include the following: texts, calendars, timelines, maps, mental maps, charts, tables, graphs, flow charts, diagrams, photographs, illustrations, paintings, cartoons, architectural drawings, documents, letters, censuses, artifacts, models, geographic models, aerial photographs, satellite-produced images, and geographic information systems.
  • SC.ECON-1. Standard / Course—Economics

    (Grade level unspecified; required for high school graduation) The student will demonstrate an understanding of how scarcity and choice impact the decisions of families, businesses, communities, and nations.

    • ECON-1.1. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Explain that the practice of economic decision making is an evaluation process that measures additional benefits versus additional costs.

    • ECON-1.2. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Explain why the productive resources of land, labor, and capital are limited.

    • ECON-1.3. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Apply the concept that people respond to positive and negative incentives to past and current economic decisions.

    • Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century:

      1. Analyze how a scarcity of productive resources affects economic choices.
      2. Explain the opportunity cost involved in the allocation of scarce productive resources.
      3. Compare the locations of places, the conditions at places, and the connections between places.
      4. Examine the relationship of the present to the past and use a knowledge of the past to make informed decisions in the present and to extrapolate into the future.
  • SC.ECON-2. Standard / Course—Economics

    (Grade level unspecified; required for high school graduation) The student will demonstrate an understanding of how markets facilitate exchange and how market regulation costs both consumers and producers.

    • ECON-2.1. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Illustrate how markets are created when voluntary exchanges occur between buyers and sellers.

    • ECON-2.2. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Explain how efficient markets allocate goods, services, and the factors of production in a market-based economy.Explain why the productive resources of land, labor, and capital are limited.

    • ECON-2.3. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Illustrate how competition among sellers lowers costs and prices.

    • ECON-2.4. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Illustrate how an economically efficient market allocates goods and services to the buyers who are willing to pay for them.

    • ECON-2.5. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Explain how business cycles, market conditions, government policies, and inequalities affect the living standards of individuals and other economic entities.

    • ECON-2.6. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Explain how market power enables some market structures to affect their situations to varying degrees and to use this market power to increase prices and reduce output.

    • Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century:

      1. Examine the costs and the benefits of economic choices made by a particular society and explain how those choices affect overall economic well-being.
      2. Compare the ways that different economic systems answer the fundamental questions of what goods and services should be produced, how they should be produced, and who will consume them.
  • SC.ECON-3. Standard / Course—Economics

    (Grade level unspecified; required for high school graduation) The student will demonstrate an understanding of how government policies, business cycles, inflation, deflation, savings rates, and employment affect all economic entities.

    • ECON-3.1. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Explain that institutions in a market economy help individuals and groups accomplish their goals.

    • ECON-3.2. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Illustrate how money and the consequent banking system facilitate trade, historically and currently.

    • ECON-3.3. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Explain how real interest rates adjust savings with borrowing, thus affecting the allocation of scarce resources between present and future users.

    • ECON-3.4. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Use a circular flow diagram to explain how changes in economic activity affect households and businesses.

    • ECON-3.5. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Explain how the federal government regulates the American economy in order to provide economic security, full employment, and economic equity.

    • ECON-3.6. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Explain how economic indicators are used to evaluate changes in economic activity.

    • ECON-3.7. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Illustrate the relationships among business cycles and unemployment, growth, price levels, wage rates, and investment.

    • ECON-3.8. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Explain how the Federal Reserve regulates the amount of cash that banks can acquire and retain and therefore helps to provide a foundation for economic stability.

    • ECON-3.9. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Exemplify how government, in a market economy, provides for services that private markets fail to provide and thus the costs of government policies often exceed benefits.

    • Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century:

      1. Explain how the United States government provides public services, redistributes income, regulates economic activity, and promotes economic growth.
      2. Analyze the role of the government in promoting entrepreneurial activity.
      3. Assess the relative importance of multiple causes on outcomes.
  • SC.ECON-4. Standard / Course—Economics

    (Grade level unspecified; required for high school graduation) The student will demonstrate an understanding of how trade among nations affects markets, employment, economic growth, and other activity in the domestic economy.

    • ECON-4.1. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Summarize how differing factor endowments—such as geography, the development of technology, and the abundance of labor—affect the goods and services in which a nation specializes.

    • ECON-4.2. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Explain how the United States specializes in the production of those goods and services in which it has a comparative advantage.

    • ECON-4.3. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Explain how the rise of a global marketplace contributes to the well-being of all societies but the benefits derived from globalization are unequal.

    • ECON-4.4. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Explain how a global marketplace influences domestic labor markets, wage rates, unemployment levels, and disparities in earning potentials.

    • Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century:

      1. Explain how political, social, and economic institutions are similar or different across time and/or throughout the world.
      2. Compare the ways that different economic systems answer the fundamental questions of what goods and services should be produced, how they should be produced, and who will consume them.
      3. Explain how an interdependent, specialized, and voluntary worldwide trade network affects a nation’s standard of living and economic growth.
  • SC.ECON-5. Standard / Course—Economics

    (Grade level unspecified; required for high school graduation) The student will demonstrate an understanding of how personal financial decisions affect an individual’s present and future economic status.

    • ECON-5.1. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Explain how individuals make personal economic decisions and how current spending and acquisition of debt can impact future income.

    • ECON-5.2. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Explain that income for most people is determined by the market value of the productive resources they sell.

    • ECON-5.3. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Explain how wage rates for most workers depend upon the market value of what the workers produce for the marketplace.

    • Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century:

      1. Explain the use of a budget in making personal economic decisions and planning for the future.
      2. Illustrate the fact that some choices provide greater benefits than others.
      3. Explain how investment in human capital such as health, education, and training leads to economic growth.
  • SC.USG-1. Standard / Course—United States Government

    (Grade level unspecified; required for high school graduation) The student will demonstrate an understanding of foundational political theory, concepts, and application.

    • USG-1.1. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Analyze political theories related to the existence, necessity, and purpose of government, including natural rights, balance of the public and private interests, and physical and economic security.

    • USG-1.2. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Analyze components of government and the governing process, including politics, power, authority, sovereignty, legitimacy, public institutions, efficacy, and civic life.

    • USG-1.3. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Evaluate the role and relationship of the citizen to government in democratic, republican, authoritarian, and totalitarian systems.

    • USG-1.4. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Analyze the institutional and organizational structure of government that allows it to carry out its purpose and function effectively, including the branches of government and legitimate bureaucratic institutions.

    • USG-1.5. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Evaluate limited government and unlimited government with regard to governance, including rule of law, the role of constitutions, civil rights, political freedom, economic freedom, and the ability of citizens to impact or influence the governing process.

    • USG-1.6. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Evaluate the organization of government in confederal, federal, and unitary systems, including the distribution of power and the advantages and disadvantages of each system.

    • Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century:

      1. Evaluate the validity of multiple points of view or biases by using evidence and sound reasoning.
      2. Analyze, interpret, and synthesize social studies resources to make inferences and draw conclusions.(USG-1)
      3. Model informed participatory citizenship.
      4. Explain how groups work to challenge traditional institutions and effect change to promote the needs and interests of society.
      (USG-1)Social studies resources include the following: texts, calendars, timelines, maps, mental maps, charts, tables, graphs, flow charts, diagrams, photographs, illustrations, paintings, cartoons, architectural drawings, documents, letters, censuses, artifacts, models, geographic models, aerial photographs, satellite-produced images, and geographic information systems.
  • SC.USG-2. Standard / Course—United States Government

    (Grade level unspecified; required for high school graduation) The student will demonstrate an understanding of foundational American political principles and the historical events and philosophical ideas that shaped the development and application of these principles.

    • USG-2.1. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Summarize core principles of United States government, including limited government, federalism, checks and balances, separation of powers, rule of law, popular sovereignty, republicanism, individual rights, freedom, equality, and self-government.

    • USG-2.2. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Analyze developmental influences on the core political principles of American government, including Greek democracy, Roman republicanism, the Judeo-Christian heritage, and the European philosophers John Locke, Charles de Montesquieu, and William Blackstone.

    • USG-2.3. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Analyze the British heritage that fostered development of the core political principles of American government, including the Magna Carta, the Petition of Right (1628), the Glorious Revolution, the English Bill of Rights, and the Mayflower Compact.

    • USG-2.4. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Evaluate significant American founding documents in relation to core political principles, including the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, state constitutions, the United States Constitution, The Federalist papers, and the Bill of Rights.

    • USG-2.5. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Evaluate significant American historical documents in relation to the application of core principles (e.g., the Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions, the Ordinance of Nullification, the Seneca Falls Declaration, the Emancipation Proclamation, Martin Luther King Jr.’s “Letter from a Birmingham Jail”), the eleventh through the twenty-seventh amendments to the Constitution, and critical Supreme Court cases.

    • Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century:

      1. Model informed participatory citizenship.
      2. Explain how groups work to challenge traditional institutions and effect change to promote the needs and interests of society.
      3. Analyze and evaluate evidence, arguments, claims, and beliefs.
      4. Examine the relationship of the present to the past and use a knowledge of the past to make informed decisions in the present and to extrapolate into the future.
  • SC.USG-3. Standard / Course—United States Government

    (Grade level unspecified; required for high school graduation) The student will demonstrate an understanding of the basic organization and function of United States government on national, state, and local levels and the role of federalism in addressing the distribution of power.

    • USG-3.1. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Evaluate the Constitution as the written framework of the United States government, including expression of the core principles of limited government, federalism, checks and balances, separation of powers, rule of law, popular sovereignty, republicanism, individual rights, freedom, equality, and self-government.

    • USG-3.2. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Evaluate the formal and informal structure, role, responsibilities, and authority of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of the national government as the embodiments of constitutional principles.

    • USG-3.3. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Analyze federalism and its application in the United States, including the concepts of enumerated, concurrent, and reserved powers; the meaning of the ninth and tenth amendments; the principle of states’ rights; the promotion of limited government; the protection of individual rights; and the potential for conflict among the levels of government.

    • USG-3.4. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Analyze the organization and responsibilities of local and state governments in the United States federal system, including the role of state constitutions, the limitations on state governments, the typical organization of state governments, the relationship between state and local governments, and the major responsibilities of state governments.

    • Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century:

      1. Explain how political, social, and economic institutions are similar or different across time and/or throughout the world.
      2. Analyze and evaluate evidence, arguments, claims, and beliefs.
      3. Evaluate the validity of multiple points of view or biases by using evidence and sound reasoning.
      4. Examine the relationship of the present to the past and use a knowledge of the past to make informed decisions in the present and to extrapolate into the future.
  • SC.USG-4. Standard / Course—United States Government

    (Grade level unspecified; required for high school graduation) The student will demonstrate an understanding of civil rights and civil liberties, the role of American citizens in the American political system, and distinctive expressions of American political culture.

    • USG-4.1. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Evaluate the role of the citizen in the American political process, including civic responsibilities and the interaction between the citizen and government.

    • USG-4.2. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Analyze the process of political socialization and its relation to political participation.

    • USG-4.3. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Evaluate the role and function of common avenues utilized by citizens in political participation, including political parties, voting, polls, interest groups, and community service.

    • USG-4.4. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Analyze the process through which citizens monitor and influence public policy, including political parties, interest groups, the media, lobbying, donations, issue advocacy, and candidate support.

    • USG-4.5. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Evaluate the importance of civil rights and civil liberties for citizens in American political culture and the protective role of the national government through the Bill of Rights, the judicial system, and the Fourteenth Amendment.

    • USG-4.6. Knowledge And Skills / Essential Question:

      Explain how fundamental values, principles, and rights often conflict within the American political system; why these conflicts arise; and how these conflicts are and can be addressed.

    • Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century:

      1. Understand responsible citizenship in relation to the state, national, and international communities.
      2. Explain his or her relationship to others in the global community.
      3. Explain contemporary patterns of human behavior, culture, and political and economic systems.
      4. Examine the relationship of the present to the past and use a knowledge of the past to make informed decisions in the present and to extrapolate into the future.
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