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Kansas: 6th-Grade Standards

  • KS.1. Standard: Civics-Government

    The student uses a working knowledge and understanding of governmental systems of Kansas and the United States and other nations with an emphasis on the United States Constitution, the necessity for the rule of law, the civic values of the American people, and the rights, privileges, and responsibilities of becoming active participants in our representative democracy.

    • 1.1. Benchmark:

      The student understands the rule of law as it applies to individuals; family; school; local, state and national governments.

      • 1.1.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student recognizes that every civilization has a form of law or order.

    • 1.2. Benchmark:

      The student understands the shared ideals and diversity of American society and political culture.

      • 1.2.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        This benchmark will be taught at another grade level.

    • 1.3. Benchmark:

      The student understands how the United States Constitution allocates power and responsibility in the government.

      • 1.3.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        This benchmark will be taught at another grade level.

    • 1.4. Benchmark:

      The student identifies and examines the rights, privileges, and responsibilities in becoming an active civic participant.

      • 1.4.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student compares and contrasts the rights of people living in Ancient Greece (Sparta and Athens) and Classical Rome with the modern United States.

    • 1.5. Benchmark:

      The student understands various systems of governments and how nations and international organizations interact.

      • 1.5.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student identifies the basic features of systems of government (e.g., republic, democracy, monarchy, dictatorship, oligarchy, theocracy).

      • 1.5.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student describes the ways political systems meet or fail to meet the needs and wants of their citizens (e.g., republic, democracy, monarchy, dictatorship oligarchy, theocracy).

      • 1.5.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student defines the characteristics of nations (e.g., territory, population, government, sovereignty).

  • KS.2. Standard: Economics

    The student uses a working knowledge and understanding of major economic concepts, issues, and systems, applying decision-making skills as a consumer, producer, saver, investor, and citizen of Kansas and the United States living in an interdependent world.

    • 2.1. Benchmark:

      The student understands how limited resources require choices.

      • 2.1.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student explains how scarcity of resources requires communities and nations to make choices about goods and services (e.g., what foods to eat, where to settle, how to use land).

      • 2.1.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student gives examples of international economic interdependence. (e.g., Europe depended on the Far East for spices & tea; Far East received silver and gem stones in exchange).

    • 2.2. Benchmark:

      The student understands how the market economy works in the United States.

      • 2.2.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        This benchmark will be taught at another grade level.

    • 2.3. Benchmark:

      The student analyzes how different incentives, economic systems and their institutions, and local, national, and international interdependence affect people.

      • 2.3.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student recognizes the economic conditions under which trade takes place among nations (e.g., students recognize that trade takes place when nations have wants or needs they cannot fulfill on their own).

      • 2.3.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student identifies barriers to trade among nations (e.g., treaties, war, transportation, geography).

    • 2.4. Benchmark:

      The student analyzes the role of the government in the economy.

      • 2.4.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        This benchmark will be taught at another grade level.

    • 2.5. Benchmark:

      The student makes effective decisions as a consumer, producer, saver, investor, and citizen.

      • 2.5.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student determines the costs and benefits of a spending, saving, or borrowing decision.

      • 2.5.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student explains that budgeting requires trade-offs in managing income and spending.

      • 2.5.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student identifies the opportunity cost that resulted from a spending decision.

      • 2.5.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes how supply of and demand for workers in various careers affect income.

  • KS.3. Standard: Geography

    The student uses a working knowledge and understanding of the spatial organization of Earth's surface and relationships between peoples and places and physical and human environments in order to explain the interactions that occur in Kansas, the United States, and in our world.

    • 3.1. Benchmark: Geographic Tools and Location

      The student uses maps, graphic representations, tools, and technologies to locate, use, and present information about people, places, and environments.

      • 3.1.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student explains and uses map titles, symbols, cardinal and intermediate directions, legends, latitude and longitude.

      • 3.1.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student locates major physical and political features of Earth from memory (e.g., China, Egypt, Greece, Central America, Mediterranean Sea, Nile River, Persian Gulf, Rome, India, Sahara Desert, Saudi Arabia, Adriatic Sea, Aegean Sea, Constantinople (modern Istanbul), Ganges River, Himalayan Mountains, Huan He (Yellow River), Indus River, Jerusalem, Mecca, Mesopotamia (modern Iraq), Persia (modern Iran), Red Sea, Tigris River, Yangtze River, Chile, Brazil, Peru, Amazon River, Andes Mountains).

      • 3.1.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student identifies major patterns of world populations, physical features, ecosystems, and cultures using historic and contemporary geographic tools (e.g., maps, illustrations, photographs, documents, data).

    • 3.2. Benchmark: Places and Regions

      The student analyzes the human and physical features that give places and regions their distinctive character.

      • 3.2.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student identifies types of regions (e.g., climatic, economic, cultural).

      • 3.2.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student describes how places and regions may be identified by cultural symbols (e.g., Acropolis in Athens, Muslim minaret, Indian sari).

      • 3.2.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student identifies and describes the location, landscape, climate, and resources of early world civilizations (e.g., Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, Greece, Rome, Middle/South America, Western Europe, West Africa, Japan).

      • 3.2.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student compares and contrasts early world civilizations in terms of human characteristics (e.g., people, religion, language, customs, government, agriculture, industry, architecture, arts, education).

      • 3.2.5. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student traces the movement (diffusion) from one region or center of civilization to other regions of the world (e.g., people, goods, and ideas).

    • 3.3. Benchmark: Physical Systems

      The student understands Earth's physical systems and how physical processes shape Earth's surface.

      • 3.3.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student explains the distribution patterns of ecosystems within hemispheres to define climatic regions.

      • 3.3.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student identifies renewable and nonrenewable resources and their uses (e.g., fossil fuels, minerals, fertile soil, waterpower, forests).

    • 3.4. Benchmark: Human Systems

      The student understands how economic, political, cultural, and social processes interact to shape patterns of human populations, interdependence, cooperation, and conflict.

      • 3.4.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student examines reasons for variation in population distribution (e.g., environment, migration, government policies, birth and death rates).

      • 3.4.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student describes the forces and processes of conflict and cooperation that divide or unite people (e.g., uneven distribution of resources, water use in ancient Mesopotamia, building projects in ancient Egypt and Middle/South America, the Greek city-states, empire building, movements for independence or rights).

    • 3.5. Benchmark: Human-Environment Interactions

      The student understands the effects of interactions between human and physical systems.

      • 3.5.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student explains how humans modify the environment and describes some of the possible consequences of those modifications (e.g., Greeks clearing the vegetation of the hillsides, dikes on the Nile and in the Mesopotamia raising the level of the river, terracing in Middle America and Asia).

      • 3.5.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level: (K) The student describes the impact of natural hazards on people and their activities (e.g., floods

        Egypt-Nile, Mesopotamia-Tigris/Euphrates; volcanic eruptions: Mt. Vesuvius).

      • 3.5.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student explains the relationship between the availability and use of natural resources and advances in technology using historical and contemporary examples (e.g., clay tablets, papyrus, paper-printing press, computer).

      • 3.5.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student explains the relationship between resources and the exploration, colonization and settlement patterns of different world regions (e.g., mercantilism, imperialism, and colonialism).

  • KS.4. Standard: History (Kansas, United States, and World History)

    The student uses a working knowledge and understanding of significant individuals, groups, ideas, events, eras, and developments in the history of Kansas, the United States, and the world, utilizing essential analytical and research skills.

    • 4.1. Benchmark:

      The student uses a working knowledge and understanding of individuals, groups, ideas, eras, developments, and turning points in the history of the world from the emergence of human communities to 500BC.

      • 4.1.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student explains the importance of the Neolithic Agricultural Revolution in moving people from Nomadic to settled village life (e.g., food production, changing technology, domestication of animals).

      • 4.1.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level: (A) The student compares the origin and accomplishments of early river valley civilizations (e.g., Tigris and Euphrates (Mesopotamia)

        city-states, Hammurabi's code; Nile Valley (Egypt): Pharaoh, centralized government; Indus Valley (India): Mohenjo Daro; Huang He (China): Shang Dynasty).

      • 4.1.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student explains central beliefs of early religions (e.g., polytheism, monotheism, animism).

    • 4.2. Benchmark:

      The student uses a working knowledge and understanding of individuals, groups, ideas, eras, developments, and turning points in the history of the world from 500BC to 700AD.

      • 4.2.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level: (K) The student compares and contrast characteristics of classic Greek government (e.g., city-states, slavery, rule by aristocrats and tyrants, Athens

        development of democracy, Sparta: city's needs come first).

      • 4.2.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level: (K) The student describes the significant contributions of ancient Greece to western culture (e.g., philosophy

        Socrates, Plato, Aristotle; literature/drama: Homer, Greek plays, architecture, sculpture).

      • 4.2.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student explains the cultural interactions in the Hellenistic Age (e.g., Alexander the Great, Persian Empire).

      • 4.2.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level: (K) The student describes key characteristics of classical Roman government (e.g., Roman Republic

        senate, consuls, veto, written law; Roman Empire: emperors, expansion).

      • 4.2.5. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes the reasons for the decline and fall of the Roman Empire.

      • 4.2.6. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student examines the central beliefs of Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, and Islam.

      • 4.2.7. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student traces the development and spread of Christianity.

      • 4.2.8. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student describes key cultural accomplishments of classical India (e.g., Asoka, Sanskrit literature, the Hindu-Arabic numerals, the zero, Buddhism, Hinduism).

      • 4.2.9. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student describes key accomplishments of ancient China (e.g., Great Wall of China, Shi Huangdi, dynastic cycle, Mandate of Heaven, Taoism, Confucianism, civil service, Silk Road).

    • 4.3. Benchmark:

      The student uses a working knowledge and understanding of individuals, groups, ideas, eras, developments, and turning points in the history of the world from 700-1400.

      • 4.3.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student describes the governmental/political, social, and economic institutions and innovations of the Maya, Aztec, and Inca civilizations.

      • 4.3.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student describes the governmental/political, social, and economic institutions and innovations of the Byzantine Empire.

      • 4.3.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student describes the political and economic institutions of medieval Europe (e.g., manorialism, feudalism, Magna Carta, Christendom, rise of cities and trade).

      • 4.3.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student describes Japanese feudalism and compares to European feudalism.

      • 4.3.5. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student explains geographic, economic, political reasons for Islam's spread into Europe, Asia, and Africa (e.g., geographic, economic, political reasons).

      • 4.3.6. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student discusses how the Crusades allowed interaction between the Islamic world and medieval Europe (e.g., science, education, architecture, mathematics, medicine, the arts, literature).

      • 4.3.7. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student explains the impact of Mongol Empires (e.g., trade routes, Silk Road, horse, Ghengis Khan).

    • 4.4. Benchmark:

      The student engages in historical thinking skills.

      • 4.4.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student examines a topic in World history to analyze changes over time and makes logical inferences concerning cause and effect (e.g., spread of ideas and innovation, rise and fall of empires).

      • 4.4.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student examines a variety of primary sources in World history and analyzes them in terms of credibility, purpose, and point of view (e.g., census records, diaries, photographs, letters, government documents).

      • 4.4.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student uses at least three primary sources to interpret a person or event from World history to develop an historical narrative.

      • 4.4.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student compares contrasting descriptions of the same event in World history to understand how people differ in their interpretations of historical events.

 
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