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Kansas: 11th-Grade Standards

  • KS.1. Standard: Civics-Government

    The student uses a working knowledge and understanding of governmental systems of Kansas and the United States and other nations with an emphasis on the United States Constitution, the necessity for the rule of law, the civic values of the American people, and the rights, privileges, and responsibilities of becoming active participants in our representative democracy.

    • 1.1. Benchmark:

      The student understands the rule of law as it applies to individuals; family; school; local, state and national governments.

      • 1.1.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student evaluates the purposes and function of law.

      • 1.1.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes how the rule of law can be used to protect the rights of individuals and to promote the common good (e.g., eminent domain, martial law during disasters, health and safety issues).

      • 1.1.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student defines civic life, politics, and governments.

      • 1.1.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student recognizes contracts may be verbal or legal agreements and are binding.

      • 1.1.5. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student defines and illustrates examples of torts (e.g., wrongful death, medical malpractice, defamation, personal injury, dignitary harms against a person, such as bodily injury or civil rights violations).

      • 1.1.6. Indicator / Proficiency Level: (A) The student defines and illustrates examples of misdemeanors and felonies (e.g. misdemeanors

        traffic violation, small theft, trespassing; felonies: murder, sexual assault, large theft).

      • 1.1.7. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student explains Kansas court structure (e.g., Municipal Courts, District Courts, Court of Appeals, Supreme Court).

    • 1.2. Benchmark:

      The student understands the shared ideals and diversity of American society and political culture.

      • 1.2.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student recognizes that a nation's values are embodied in the Constitution, statutes, and important court cases (e.g., Dred Scott vs. Sanford, Plessy vs. Ferguson, Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka).

      • 1.2.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student understands core civic values inherent in the United States Constitution, Bill of Rights, and Declaration of Independence that have been the foundation for unity in American society (e.g., right to free speech, religion, press, assembly; equality; human dignity; civic responsibility, sovereignty of the people).

      • 1.2.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student examines the fundamental values and principles of the American political tradition as expressed in historic documents, speeches and events, and ways in which these values and principles conflict (e.g., equal opportunity and fairness vs. affirmative action).

    • 1.3. Benchmark:

      The student understands how the United States Constitution allocates power and responsibility in the government.

      • 1.3.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student describes the purposes, organization, and functions of the three branches of government and independent regulatory agencies in relation to the United States Constitution.

      • 1.3.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student explains Constitutional powers (e.g., expressed/enumerated, implied, inherent, reserved, concurrent).

      • 1.3.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student discusses that the United States Constitution has been able to sustain American government over time by the ability of the people to amend the document.

    • 1.4. Benchmark:

      The student identifies and examines the rights, privileges, and responsibilities in becoming an active civic participant.

      • 1.4.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student examines the role of political parties in channeling public opinion, allowing people to act jointly, nominating candidates, conducting campaigns, and training future leaders.

      • 1.4.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student explains how public policy is formed and carried out at local, state, and national levels and what roles individuals and groups can play in the process.

      • 1.4.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes policies, actions, and issues regarding the rights of individuals to equal protection under the law.

      • 1.4.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student examines issues regarding political rights (e.g., to be an informed voter, participate in the political process, assume leadership roles).

      • 1.4.5. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student understands that civil disobedience is a form of protest and if taken to extreme, punishable by law.

      • 1.4.6. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes issues regarding economic freedoms within the United States (e.g., free enterprise, rights of individual choice, government regulation).

      • 1.4.7. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student explores issues regarding civic responsibilities of American citizens (e.g., obeying the law, paying taxes, voting, jury duty, serving our country, providing leadership, involvement in the political process).

      • 1.4.8. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student examines the role of interest groups and their impact on governmental policy.

    • 1.5. Benchmark:

      The student understands various systems of governments and how nations and international organizations interact.

      • 1.5.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level: (A) The student compares various governmental systems with that of the United States government in terms of sovereignty, structure, function, decision-making processes, citizenship roles, and political culture and ideology (e.g., systems

        constitutional monarchy, parliamentary democracy, dictatorship, totalitarianism; ideology: fascism, socialism, communism).

      • 1.5.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student discusses the structure of international relations both regional and world-wide (e.g., trade, economic and defense alliances, regional security).

      • 1.5.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student examines the purpose and functions of multi-national organizations (e.g., United Nations, NATO, International Red Cross).

      • 1.5.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student explains the changing roles of the United States Government in the international community (e.g., treaties, NATO, UN, exploitative, altruistic, benign).

      • 1.5.5. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student examines a position concerning the use of various tools in carrying out United States foreign policy (e.g., trade sanctions, extension of the 'most favored nation' status, military interventions).

      • 1.5.6. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student examines the issues of social justice and human rights as expressed in the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights.

  • KS.2. Standard: Economics

    The student uses a working knowledge and understanding of major economic concepts, issues, and systems applying decision-making skills as a consumer, producer, saver, investor, and citizen of Kansas and the United States living in an interdependent world.

    • 2.1. Benchmark:

      The student understands how limited resources require choices.

      • 2.1.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student explains how economic systems affect the allocation of scarce resources (e.g., monarchies, financing explorers, mercantilism, rise of capitalism).

      • 2.1.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student explains how economic choices made by societies have intended and unintended consequences. (e.g., mercantilism, 'planned economy' under Soviet Union, Adam Smith-Invisible hand/Laissez Faire).

      • 2.1.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student explains how people respond to incentives in order to allocate scarce resources (e.g., government subsidies/farm production, rationing coupons/WWII, emission regulations, profits/war production, women/WWII workforce).

      • 2.1.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level: (K) The student explains how economic choices made by individuals, businesses, or governments often have intended and unintended consequences (e.g., individual

        build a house in a flood plain; business: car, need for roads, railroads, ecosystems; government: isolationism at beginning of WWI, Prohibition Act, Space Race, building of atomic bomb).

    • 2.2. Benchmark:

      The student understands how the market economy works in the United States.

      • 2.2.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student defines Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and indicates the components that make up our nation's GDP (e.g., consumption, investment, government, and net exports).

      • 2.2.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student explains the factors that have contributed to United States economic growth (e.g., increasing education and literacy, health care advances, technology developments).

      • 2.2.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student explains the principles of demand and supply (e.g., laws, equilibrium, change in quantity vs. change in demand and supply).

      • 2.2.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level: (K) The student explains the factors that could change supply of or demand for a product (e.g., societal values

        prohibition of alcohol; scarcity of resources: war; technology: assembly line production).

      • 2.2.5. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes how changes in prices affect consumer behavior and sometimes result in government actions (e.g., WWII-rationing, fuel, metals, nylon; Arab oil embargo of 1974; droughts (Ag products), changes in consumer preferences - fads, health information).

      • 2.2.6. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student describes what happens to the product price and output of businesses when the degree of competition changes in an industry (e.g., oil, steel, automobiles (1970s), railroads in late 1800's and early 1900's, AT&T, Microsoft, Trusts of 1920's & 1930's).

      • 2.2.7. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes the role of central banks and the Federal Reserve System in the economy of the United States (e.g., interest rates, monetary policy, government bonds).

    • 2.3. Benchmark:

      The student analyzes how different incentives, economic systems and their institutions, and local, national, and international interdependence affect people.

      • 2.3.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student compares the benefits and costs of different allocation methods (e.g., first come, first serve; prices, contests, lottery, majority rule).

      • 2.3.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student compares characteristics of traditional command, market, and mixed economies on the basis of property rights, factors of production and locus of economic decision making (e.g., what, how, for whom).

      • 2.3.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student uses comparative advantage to explain the benefits of trade among nations (e.g., nations can benefit from free trade while reducing or eliminating production of a good in which it is technologically superior at producing; to benefit from specialization and free trade, one nation should specialize and trade the good in which it is 'most best' at producing, while the other nation should specialize and trade the good in which it is 'least best' at producing; benefits include more product selection, lower prices, higher wages in both nations).

      • 2.3.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student outlines the cost and benefits of free trade or restricted trade policies in world history (e.g., restrictions of trade under mercantilism, regional trade agreements, Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act of 1930, General Agreement on Tariffs & Trade (GATT), World Trade Organization (WTO)).

      • 2.3.5. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student explains how a change in exchange rates affects the flow of trade between nations and a nation's domestic economy (e.g., using historical examples such as development of the Euro, devaluation of the United States dollar in the early 1970s, & currency boards in the transitional economies of Eastern Europe).

    • 2.4. Benchmark:

      The student analyzes the role of the government in the economy.

      • 2.4.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student explains why certain goods and services are provided by the government (e.g., infrastructure, schools, waste management, national defense, parks, environmental protection).

      • 2.4.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student explains the advantages and disadvantages of the use of fiscal policy by the Federal Government to influence the United States economy (e.g., change in taxes & spending to expand or contract the economy, such as Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal, George W. Bush's tax cuts, Gerald Ford's WIN program).

      • 2.4.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student distinguishes between government debt and government budget deficit.

      • 2.4.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student evaluates the costs and benefits of governmental economic and social policies on society (e.g., minimum wage laws, anti-trust laws, EPA Regulations, Social Security, farm subsidies, international sanctions on agriculture, Medicare, unemployment insurance, corporate tax credits, public work projects).

    • 2.5. Benchmark:

      The student makes effective decisions as a consumer, producer, saver, investor, and citizen.

      • 2.5.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student describes how various jobs and employment are impacted by changes in the economy.

      • 2.5.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student illustrates how the demand for labor is influenced by productivity of labor and explains the factors that influence labor productivity (e.g., education, experience, health, nutrition, technology).

      • 2.5.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student explains how the demand for and supply of labor are influenced by productivity, education, skills, retraining, and wage rates (e.g., spinning mills and the beginning of the modern factory system, the increased use of machinery throughout the Industrial Revolution, assembly lines).

      • 2.5.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student develops a personal budget that identifies sources of income and expenditures (e.g., wages, rent payments, savings, taxes, insurance).

      • 2.5.5. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student determines the costs and benefits of using credit.

      • 2.5.6. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes the costs and benefits of investment alternatives (e.g., stock market, bonds, real estate).

  • KS.3. Standard: Geography

    The student uses a working knowledge and understanding of the spatial organization of Earth's surface and relationships between peoples and places and physical and human environments in order to explain the interactions that occur in Kansas, the United States, and in our world.

    • 3.1. Benchmark: Geographic Tools and Location

      The student uses maps, graphic representations, tools, and technologies to locate, use, and present information about people, places, and environments.

      • 3.1.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student locates major political and physical features of Earth from memory and compares the relative locations of those features. Locations will be included in indicator at each grade level (e.g., Beijing, English Channel, India, Iraq, Moscow, Sahara Desert, South Africa, Venezuela, Balkan Peninsula, Berlin, Black Sea, Bosporus Strait, Euphrates River, Geneva, Hong Kong, Israel, Libya, North Korea, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Korea, Suez Canal, Tigris River, Tokyo, Yangtze River).

      • 3.1.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student interprets maps and other graphic representations to analyze United States and world issues (e.g., urban vs. urban areas, development vs. conservation, land use in the world vs. local community, nuclear waste disposal, relocation of refugees).

      • 3.1.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes ways in which mental maps influence past, present, and future decisions about location, settlement, and public policy (e.g., building sites, planned communities, settlement sites).

      • 3.1.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student produces maps and other geographic representations, using data from a variety of sources to answer questions and solve problems (e.g., census data, interviews, geographic information system (GIS) and other databases, questionnaires).

    • 3.2. Benchmark: Places and Regions

      The student analyzes the human and physical features that give places and regions their distinctive character.

      • 3.2.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student demonstrates how various regional frameworks are used to interpret the complexity of Earth (e.g., vegetation, climate, religion, language, occupations, industries, resources, governmental systems, economic systems).

      • 3.2.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes the factors that contribute to human changes in regions (e.g., technology alters use of place, migration, changes in cultural characteristics, political factors).

      • 3.2.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student recognizes how regional identity both unifies and delineates groups of people (e.g., being from the Midwest both connects a person to others from that region and defines them to others as Midwesterners with particular characteristics and values).

      • 3.2.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student uses regions to analyze past and present issues to answer questions (e.g., conflicts caused by overlapping regional identities, causes and impacts of regional alliances, changing regional identities).

      • 3.2.5. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes the ways in which people's perception of places and regions affect their decisions (e.g., land use, property value, settlement patterns, job opportunities).

    • 3.3. Benchmark: Physical Systems

      The student understands Earth's physical systems and how physical processes shape Earth's surface.

      • 3.3.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes the patterns of physical processes and their effect on humans (e.g., weather patterns, earthquakes, drought, desertification).

      • 3.3.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes the distribution of ecosystems by examining relationships between soil, climate, plant, and animal life.

      • 3.3.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student describes the ways in which Earth's physical processes are dynamic and interactive (e.g., rising ocean levels, sea floor spreading, wind and water deposition, climatic changes).

      • 3.3.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes an ecosystem to understand and solve problems regarding environmental issues (e.g., carrying capacity, biological magnification, reduction of species diversity, acid rain, ozone depletion, contamination).

    • 3.4. Benchmark: Human Systems

      The student understands how economic, political, cultural, and social processes interact to shape patterns of human populations, interdependence, cooperation, and conflict.

      • 3.4.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student identifies trends of population growth and migration in response to environmental, social, economic, political, or technological factors (e.g., stress on infrastructure, impact on environment, cultural diffusion, socio-economic changes and pressures).

      • 3.4.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes how communication and transportation facilitate cultural interchange (e.g., nationalism, ethnic pride, cross-cultural adaptation, popularity of ethnic foods).

      • 3.4.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student evaluates market areas to determine reasons for success or failure (e.g., advantages of location, trade partnerships, land value, wars, labor supply and cost, resource availability, transportation access, government structure, political cooperation).

      • 3.4.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes the purpose and characteristics of settlements (e.g., village vs. town vs. city, cities in development vs. developed countries, rise of megalopolis edge cities and metropolitan corridors, regional characteristics of cities, impact of transportation technology, increasing number of ethnic enclaves).

      • 3.4.5. Indicator / Proficiency Level: (K) The student gives examples of how cultural cooperation and conflict are involved in shaping the distribution of and connections between cultural, political, and economic spaces on Earth (e.g., cultural

        Hindu vs. Muslims in India; political: International Court of Justice and Hong Kong; economic: World Trade Organization).

    • 3.5. Benchmark: Human-Environment Interactions

      The student understands the effects of interactions between human and physical systems.

      • 3.5.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student examines the impact that technology has on human modification of the physical environment (e.g., over-fishing, logging and mining, construction on floodplains, internal combustion engine, toxic waste).

      • 3.5.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student examines alternative strategies to respond to constraints placed on human systems by the physical environment (e.g., irrigation, terracing, sustainable agriculture, water diversion, natural disaster-resistant construction).

      • 3.5.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student discusses the pros and cons of specific policies and programs for resource use and management (e.g., EPA, building restrictions, mandated recycling, grazing).

  • KS.4. Standard: History (Kansas embedded with United States History Course)

    The student uses a working knowledge and understanding of significant individuals, groups, ideas, events, eras and developments in the history of Kansas, the United States, and the world, utilizing essential analytical and research skills.

    • 4.1. Benchmark:

      The student uses a working knowledge and understanding of individuals, groups, ideas, developments, and turning points in the era of the emergence of the modern United States (1890 -1930).

      • 4.1.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes the ways the People's Party Platform of 1892 addressed the social and economic issues facing Kansas and the nation.

      • 4.1.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes the text of William Allen White's essay 'What's the Matter with Kansas' to understand his opposition to Populism.

      • 4.1.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student explains the significance of the Girard newspaper Appeal to Reason to the Socialist movement in the United States.

      • 4.1.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student discusses the child labor laws enacted by the Kansas legislature during the Progressive period (e.g., 1905, 1909, 1917).

      • 4.1.5. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student understands the role of the Court of Industrial Relations in solving labor disputes in the 1920s.

      • 4.1.6. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student explains the influence of Kansas writers and artists on the Harlem Renaissance (e.g., Langston Hughes, Frank Marshall Davis, Aaron Douglas, Coleman Hawkins).

      • 4.1.7. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student explains the challenges German Americans faced in Kansas during World War I (e.g., discrimination, movement against German languages).

    • 4.2. Benchmark:

      The student uses a working knowledge and understanding of individuals, groups, ideas, developments, and turning points in the era of the Great Depression through World War II in United States history (1930-1945).

      • 4.2.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student uses primary source materials to explore individual experiences in the Dust Bowl in Kansas (e.g., diaries, oral histories, letters).

      • 4.2.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student researches how the WPA altered the Kansas landscape. (e.g., public art, bridges, parks, swimming pools, libraries).

      • 4.2.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes Alf Landon's 1936 speech accepting the Republican nomination for President in terms of the debate over the role of government in the United States recovery.

      • 4.2.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student understands the role of Kansas aviation companies in World War II.

      • 4.2.5. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student understands how conscientious objectors in Kansas participated in alternative service to the country during World War II.

    • 4.3. Benchmark:

      The student uses a working knowledge and understanding of individuals, groups, ideas, developments, and turning points in the era of the Cold War (1945-1990).

      • 4.3.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka as it relates to Kansas segregation laws and why it takes the lead in the Supreme Court case.

      • 4.3.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student explains how Kansans have responded to increasing urbanization and industrialization.

      • 4.3.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student traces the history of women in political life in Kansas from Susanna Salter to Nancy Landon Kassebaum to understand issues and accomplishments.

      • 4.3.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student debates the ways state government has tried to balance the needs of farmers, industries, environmentalists, and consumers in regards to water protection and regulation.

    • 4.4. Benchmark:

      The student uses a working knowledge and understanding of individuals, groups, ideas, developments, and turning points in contemporary United States history (since 1990).

      • 4.4.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student researches a contemporary issue in Kansas and constructs a well developed argument in support or opposition of position.

      • 4.4.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student examines the history of racial and ethnic relations in Kansas and applies this knowledge to current events.

    • 4.5. Benchmark:

      The student engages in historical thinking skills.

      • 4.5.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes a theme in Kansas history to explain patterns of continuity and change over time.

      • 4.5.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student develops historical questions on a specific topic in Kansas history and analyzes the evidence in primary source documents to speculate on the answers.

      • 4.5.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student investigates an event in Kansas history using primary and secondary sources and develops a credible interpretation of the event, speculating on its meaning.

      • 4.5.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student compares competing historical narratives in Kansas history by contrasting different historians' choice of questions, use of sources, and points of view, in order to demonstrate how these factors contribute to different interpretations.

  • KS.5. Standard: History (United States)

    The student uses a working knowledge and understanding of significant individuals, groups, ideas, events, eras and developments in the history of Kansas, the United States, and the world, utilizing essential analytical and research skills.

    • 5.1. Benchmark:

      The student uses a working knowledge and understanding of individuals, groups, ideas, developments, and turning points in the era of the emergence of the modern United States (1890 - 1930).

      • 5.1.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student examines topics in the transformation of American society in the rise of big business, heavy industry, and mechanized farming in the late 19th century (e.g., Social Darwinism, Gospel of Wealth, 'Robber Barons' or 'Captains of Industry', Sherman Antitrust Act, muckrakers).

      • 5.1.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student explains the rise of the American labor movement (e.g., Samuel Gompers, Haymarket Tragedy, Mother Jones, Industrial Workers of the World, Eugene Debs, strikes).

      • 5.1.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes the key ideas of William Jennings Bryan and other populists (e.g., free coinage of silver, government ownership of railroads, graduated income tax, direct election of senators, election reform).

      • 5.1.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student examines the emergence of the United States in international affairs at the turn of the 20thh century (e.g., debate over imperialism, Spanish-American War, Philippine Insurrection, Panama Canal, Open Door Policy, Roosevelt Corollary, Dollar Diplomacy).

      • 5.1.5. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student explains the spread of Progressive ideas (e.g., political influence on elections, desire to have government regulation of private business and industries, child labor laws, muckrakers, Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson).

      • 5.1.6. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes the reasons for and impact of the United States' entrance into World War I.

      • 5.1.7. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes how the home front was influenced by United States involvement in World War I (e.g., Food Administration, Espionage Act, Red Scare, influenza, Creel Committee).

      • 5.1.8. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student retraces the progress of the women's suffrage movement from the state to the national arena (e.g., Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Alice Paul, states granting voting rights in the 19th Amendment).

      • 5.1.9. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes factors that contributed to changes in work, production and the rise of a consumer culture during the 1920's (e.g., leisure time, technology, communication, travel, assembly line, credit buying).

      • 5.1.10. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student evaluates various social conflicts in the early 1920's (e.g., rural vs. urban, fundamentalism vs. modernism, prohibition, nativism, flapper vs. traditional woman's role).

      • 5.1.11. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes significant developments in race relations (e.g., rise of Ku Klux Klan, the Great Migration, race riots, NAACP, Tuskegee).

      • 5.1.12. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student interprets how the arts, music, and literature reflected social change during the Jazz Age (e.g., Harlem Renaissance, F. Scott Fitzgerald, development of blues and jazz culture).

    • 5.2. Benchmark:

      The student uses a working knowledge and understanding of individuals, groups, ideas, developments, and turning points in the era of the Great Depression through World War II in United States history (1930-1945).

      • 5.2.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes the causes and impact of the Great Depression (e.g., overproduction, consumer debt, banking regulation, unequal distribution of wealth).

      • 5.2.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level: (A) The student analyzes the costs and benefits of New Deal programs. (e.g., budget deficits vs. creating employment, expanding government

        CCC, WPA, Social Security, TVA, community infrastructure improved, dependence on subsides).

      • 5.2.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes the debate over expansion of federal government programs during the Depression (e.g., Herbert Hoover, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Alf Landon, Huey Long, Father Charles Coughlin).

      • 5.2.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes the human cost of the Dust Bowl through art and literature (e.g., Dorothea Lange, Woody Guthrie, John Steinbeck).

      • 5.2.5. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes the debate over and reasons for United States entry into World War II (e.g., growth of totalitarianism, America First Committee, neutrality, isolationism, Pearl Harbor).

      • 5.2.6. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student discusses how World War II influenced the home front (e.g., women in the work place, rationing, role of the radio in communicating news from the war front, victory gardens, conscientious objectors).

      • 5.2.7. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student examines the complexity of race and ethnic relations (e.g., Zoot Suit Riots, Japanese internment camps, American reaction to atrocities of Holocaust and unwillingness to accept Jewish refugees).

      • 5.2.8. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student examines the entry of the United States into the nuclear age (e.g., Manhattan Project, Truman's decision to use the atomic bombs, opposition to nuclear weapons).

    • 5.3. Benchmark:

      The student uses a working knowledge and understanding of individuals, groups, ideas, developments, and turning points in the era of the Cold War (1945-1990).

      • 5.3.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student explains why the United States emerged as a superpower as the result of World War II.

      • 5.3.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes the origins of the Cold War (e.g., establishment of the Soviet Bloc, Mao's victory in China, Marshall Plan, Berlin Blockade, Iron Curtain).

      • 5.3.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student evaluates the foreign policies of Truman and Eisenhower during the Cold War (e.g., establishment of the United Nations, containment, NATO, Truman Doctrine, Berlin Blockade, Korean War, Iron Curtain, U-2 incident).

      • 5.3.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student evaluates the foreign policies of Kennedy and Johnson during the Cold War (e.g., Cuban Missile Crisis, Berlin Wall, Vietnam War, Peace Corp).

      • 5.3.5. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes domestic life in the United States during the Cold War era (e.g., McCarthyism, federal aid to education, interstate highway system, space as the New Frontier, Johnson's Great Society).

      • 5.3.6. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes the cause and effect of the counterculture in the United States (e.g., Sputnik, reaction to the Military Industrial Complex, assassinations of Kennedy and King, draft, Vietnam War, Watergate Scandal).

      • 5.3.7. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student examines the struggle for racial and gender equality and for the extension of civil rights (e.g., Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka, Little Rock Nine, Martin Luther King, Jr., Montgomery Bus Boycott, Voting Rights Act of 1965, Betty Friedan, NOW, ERA, Title IX).

      • 5.3.8. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student discusses events that contributed to the end of the Cold War (e.g., Detente, Nixon's visit to China, SALT talks, expansion of the military-arms race, relationship between Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev).

      • 5.3.9. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student evaluates the causes and effects of the reform movements of the 1960s and 1970s (e.g., environmentalism - Rachel Carson, EPA; consumer protection - Ralph Nader; changes in the American labor movement - Cesar Chavez).

    • 5.4. Benchmark:

      The student uses a working knowledge and understanding of individuals, groups, ideas, developments, and turning points in contemporary United States history (since 1990).

      • 5.4.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student examines the relationship of the United States to the rest of the world in the post Cold War era (e.g., domestic and international terrorism, United States as the single superpower, United States involvement in the Middle East conflict, spread and resistance to United States popular culture).

      • 5.4.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student describes the impact of developments in technology, global communication, and transportation.

      • 5.4.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student researches major contemporary social issues.

      • 5.4.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student describes how changes in the national and global economy have influenced the work place.

      • 5.4.5. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student examines United States immigration policy to understand the affects of legal and illegal immigration (e.g., political, social, economic).

    • 5.5. Benchmark:

      The student engages in historical thinking skills.

      • 5.5.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes a theme in United States history to explain patterns of continuity and change over time.

      • 5.5.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student develops historical questions on a specific topic in United States history and analyzes the evidence in primary source documents to speculate on the answers.

      • 5.5.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student uses primary and secondary sources about an event in U.S. history to develop a credible interpretation of the event, evaluating on its meaning (e.g., uses provided primary and secondary sources to interpret a historical-based conclusion).

      • 5.5.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student compares competing historical narratives in United States history by contrasting different historians' choice of questions, use of sources, and points of view, in order to demonstrate how these factors contribute to different interpretations.

  • KS.6. Standard: History (World)

    The student uses a working knowledge and understanding of significant individuals, groups, ideas, events, eras and developments in the history of Kansas, the United States, and the world, utilizing essential analytical and research skills.

    • 6.1. Benchmark:

      The student uses a working knowledge and understanding of individuals, groups, ideas, developments, and turning points of the Global Age of Exploration (1400-1750).

      • 6.1.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level: (A) The student analyzes the changes in European thought and culture resulting from the Renaissance (e.g., more secular worldview; Machiavelli, Shakespeare; humanism; innovations in art

        Michelangelo, Da Vinci; architecture: St. Peters Dome).

      • 6.1.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student investigates the changes in European thought and culture resulting from the Reformation (e.g., establishment of Protestant faiths, Counter reformation, Gutenberg Press, Catholic vs. Protestant wars of religion).

      • 6.1.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student examines the economic and social consequences of European exploration and expansion (e.g., rise of European power, mercantilism, Columbian Exchange, impact on indigenous people in North and South America, trans-Atlantic slave trade).

      • 6.1.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level: (A) The student compares and contrasts the rise of constitutionalism in Britain with political structures in France. (e.g., changes resulting from the English Civil War and Glorious Revolution

        English Bill of Rights, establishment of Parliament, French Absolutism).

      • 6.1.5. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student explores the growth of Russian Absolutism (e.g., Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, Catherine the Great).

      • 6.1.6. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student explains the significance of the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mogul Empires (e.g., the Fall of Constantinople and the establishment of Ottoman dominance in the Balkans and Southwest Asia; The spread of Shi'ism in Persia, the establishment of Islamic rule in India).

      • 6.1.7. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student describes why East Asia withdrew into isolationalism during a time of European expansion (e.g., Tokugawa Shogunate, end of Great Ming Naval Expeditions).

    • 6.2. Benchmark:

      The student uses a working knowledge and understanding of individuals, groups, ideas, developments, and turning points of the Age of Revolutions (1650-1920).

      • 6.2.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student explains essential concepts from the Scientific Revolution (e.g., the Heliocentric Theory; Natural Law; scientific method).

      • 6.2.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student explains essential concepts from the Enlightenment that represented a turning point in intellectual history (e.g., ideas of Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Voltaire, Montesquieu, Mary Wollstonecraft, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Enlightened despotism, salons).

      • 6.2.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes outcomes of the American and French Revolutions (e.g., the establishment of republican government grounded in Enlightenment thought, the deterioration of the French Republic into the reign of terror; the spread of revolutionary ideas and nationalism with the growth of Napoleonic France).

      • 6.2.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student explores industrialization and its consequences in Britain (e.g., the rise of laissez-faire economics in Britain, Adam Smith, Chartists, development of the middle class).

      • 6.2.5. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student compares and contrasts German unification with the Meiji Restoration (e.g., nationalism, militarism, modernization, industrialization).

      • 6.2.6. Indicator / Proficiency Level: (K) The student describes the motives and impact of imperialism (e.g., motives

        economic-natural resources and expansion of trade, the competition for colonies in Africa and Asia and the Berlin Conference; humanitarian- missionaries and the ideology of Social Darwinism, political- naval bases and expansion of political control; restriction of human rights in King Leopold's Congo; development of infrastructure; roads, schools, hospitals, railroads; assimilation and loss of indigenous culture).

      • 6.2.7. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes the causes and impact of the Russian Revolution (e.g., the idea of communism as an economic alternative to capitalism; Vladimir Lenin, Karl Marx, Communist Manifesto, failure of tsarist regime, economic instability; beginnings of totalitarianism).

      • 6.2.8. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student examines causes of anti-colonial movements in Latin America, Asia, and Africa (e.g., Haitian Revolution; Bolivar; San Martin; Hidalgo and Morelos; Taiping Rebellion; Boxer Rebellion; Sepoy Rebellion; Zulu Wars).

      • 6.2.9. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student describes the impact of cross-cultural exchange on artistic developments of the late 19th century (e.g., romanticism; impressionism, impact of Asian culture on western culture).

    • 6.3. Benchmark:

      The student uses a working knowledge and understanding of individuals, groups, ideas, developments, and turning points of the Era of World War (1914-1945).

      • 6.3.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level: (A) The student analyzes the causes and immediate consequences of WWI (e.g., imperialism rivalries

        Triple Entente, Triple Alliance, nationalism, arms race in England, France, and Germany; Treaty of Versailles, reparations, War Guilt Clause).

      • 6.3.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student describes the emergence of contemporary Middle East (e.g., petroleum society, Zionism, Arab nationalism, Balfour Declaration, dissolution of the Ottoman Empire, Armenian Genocide, Ataturk's modernization of Turkey).

      • 6.3.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student examines the nature of totalitarianism in fascist Germany and communist Soviet Union (e.g., one party rule; systematic violation of human rights, secret police, state supremacy over individual rights, role of private property, class structure).

      • 6.3.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes the causes and immediate consequences of WWII (e.g., German, Italian, and Japanese aggression; failure of the League of Nations; appeasement; development of American, British-Soviet alliance; Holocaust; Nanjing; introduction of nuclear weapons; war crime trials).

      • 6.3.5. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes the independence movement in India (e.g., Gandhi, non-violence, Salt March, boycotts, creation of Pakistan).

      • 6.3.6. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student describes major intellectual, social, and artistic developments (e.g., surrealism, mural art of Mexico, Bauhaus, emergence of film and radio, rise of psychology, antibiotics, cubism).

    • 6.4. Benchmark:

      The student uses a working knowledge and understanding of individuals, groups, ideas, developments, and turning points of the World Since 1945.

      • 6.4.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes the Cold War as the competition between two competing ideologies or world views and its impact on various regions of the world. (e.g., roots in WWII, Mao's China; the Cold War in Europe; NATO, Warsaw Pact, and the competition for non-aligned nations; collapse of Communism in Europe).

      • 6.4.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student examines issues of social justice and human rights as expressed in the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

      • 6.4.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level: (K) The student describes the emergence of the Middle East as an influential region in world politics (e.g., creation of the state of Israel, emerging Middle Eastern post WWII nationalism

        Suez Crisis, petroleum based interdependence).

      • 6.4.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes the impact of international organizations on global interaction (e.g., the United Nations; Organization of American States, NATO, non-governmental organizations such as the International Red Cross, European Union).

      • 6.4.5. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student examines the trade-offs made by societies between economic growth and environmental protection in a world of limited resources. (e.g., the Green Revolution, population pressure, water, pollution, natural resource degradation).

      • 6.4.6. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (K) The student describes major intellectual, social and artistic developments (e.g., decoding DNA, space technology, consumerism, post-modernism, responses to globalization, feminism, fundamentalism, telecommunications).

    • 6.5. Benchmark:

      The student engages in historical thinking skills.

      • 6.5.1. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student analyzes a theme in world history to explain patterns of continuity and change over time.

      • 6.5.2. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student develops historical questions on a specific topic in world history and analyzes the evidence in primary source documents to speculate on the answers.

      • 6.5.3. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student uses primary and secondary sources about an event in world history to develop a credible interpretation of the event, forming conclusions about its meaning (e.g., use provided primary and secondary sources to interpret a historical-based conclusion).

      • 6.5.4. Indicator / Proficiency Level:

        (A) The student compares competing historical narratives in world history by contrasting different historians' choice of questions, use of sources, and points of view, in order to demonstrate how these factors contribute to different interpretations.

 
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