Teaching Materials
Ask a Master Teacher
Lesson Plan Gateway
Lesson Plan Reviews
State Standards
Teaching Guides
Digital Classroom
Ask a Digital Historian
Tech for Teachers
Beyond the Chalkboard
History Content
Ask a Historian
Beyond the Textbook
History Content Gateway
History in Multimedia
Museums and Historic Sites
National Resources
Quiz
Website Reviews
Issues and Research
Report on the State of History Education
Research Briefs
Roundtables
Best Practices
Examples of Historical Thinking
Teaching in Action
Teaching with Textbooks
Using Primary Sources
TAH Projects
Lessons Learned
Project Directors Conference
Project Spotlight
TAH Projects
About
Staff
Partners
Technical Working Group
Research Advisors
Teacher Representatives
Privacy
Quiz Rules
Blog
Outreach
Teaching History.org logo and contact info

DC: Second Grade Standards

(Note: In 2011, DC public schools began transitioning to the Common Core State Standards.)

  • Geography

    • 2.1. Broad Concept: Students use map and globe skills to determine the absolute locations of places and interpret information available through a map or globe’s legend, scale, and symbolic representations.

      Students:

      1. Understand how maps and globes depict geographical information in different ways. (G)
      2. Locate the continents, regions, or countries from which students, parents, guardians, grandparents, or other relatives or ancestors came to Washington, DC. (G)
      3. Identify the location and significance of well-known sites, events, or landmarks in different countries and regions from which Washington, DC, students’ families hail. (G)
      4. Explain the human characteristics of places, including houses, schools, communities, neighborhoods, and businesses. (G)

      Examples

      • Students survey their families and/or caregivers to determine where they or their parents came from. In class, each student places push-pins on a map to show their countries or states of origin (2.1.1).
      • Using research sources (e.g., the Internet, encyclopedias, trade book magazines), students choose a landmark from their families’ backgrounds. They prepare a poster, book, diorama, native dress, or other representation of an event or landmark to share with the class (2.1.3).
  • Civic Values

    • 2.2. Broad Concept: Students describe the rights and responsibilities of citizenship.

      Students:

      1. Identify the rights and responsibilities that students have in the school as citizens and members of the school community (e.g., right to vote in a class election, responsibility to follow school rules, responsibility not to harm one another, responsibility to respect each other’s feelings). (P)
      2. Understand how one becomes an American citizen (e.g., by birth, naturalization). (P)
      3. Define the meaning of words associated with good citizenship (e.g., politeness, achievement, courage, honesty, and reliability). (P)
      4. Examples

        • Students, together with their teacher, develop a proposed code of behavior for the classroom and school. In small groups, students examine each proposal and determine why it is important to the smooth functioning of the classroom or school community. Student groups share their conclusions in a class meeting (2.2.1).
        • Students identify historic or familiar figures that exemplify certain virtues (e.g., a person from within the school or community who exemplifies politeness, Benjamin Franklin for achievement, Rosa Parks for courage, Abraham Lincoln for honesty, or Harry Truman for reliability). Students divide into small groups to write and perform a puppet show that demonstrates each virtue (2.2.2).
    • 2.3. Broad Concept: Students explain governmental institutions and practices in the United States and other countries.

      Students:

      1. Explain the development and consequences of school and classroom rules. (P)
      2. Explain how human beings went from developing rules for small groups to developing rules for larger and larger groups, including nations and states, then global communities.
      3. Understand how the United States makes laws, determines whether laws have been violated, and the consequences for such laws. (P)
      4. Identify ways in which groups and nations interact with one another to try to resolve problems (e.g., trade, treaties). (P)

      Examples

      • Students listen to House Mouse, Senate Mouse, by Peter W. Barnes and Cheryl Shaw Barnes, to become familiar with the legislative process. As a class, they choose an issue that deserves attention and write a bill to address the issue. They make a chart listing the steps the bill will go through as it makes its way through Congress (2.3.4).
    • 2.4. Broad Concept: Students understand the importance of individual action and character, and they explain, from examining biographies, how people who have acted righteously have made a difference in others’ lives and have achieved the status of heroes in the remote and recent past. (P, S)

      Examples

      • Teachers are free to choose whatever biographies they wish. Here are some suggestions: Neil Armstrong, Joan Baez, Benjamin Banneker, Sitting Bull, Luisa Capetillo, Cesar Chavez, Linda Chávez, Roberto Clemente, France Anne Córdova, Frederick Douglass, Thomas Edison, Albert Einstein, Juan Carlos Finlay, Bill Gates, Alberto Gonzales, Dolores Huerta, Daniel Inouye, Abraham Lincoln, Thurgood Marshall, Cecilia Muñoz, Rosa Parks, Louis Pasteur, Colin Powell, Sally Ride, Jackie Robinson, Sacagawea, Jonas Salk, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Clarence Thomas, Harriet Tubman, Booker T. Washington, Walter Washington, Ida B. Wells, and the Wright brothers.
    • 2.5. Broad Concept: Students describe the human characteristics of familiar places and varied backgrounds of U.S. citizens and residents in those places.

      Students:

      1. Distinguish traditional food, customs, sports and games, and music from other countries that can be found in the United States today. (P, S)
      2. Describe beliefs, customs, ceremonies, and traditions of the varied cultures, drawing from folklore. (P, S)
      3. Explain the ways in which we are all part of the same community, sharing principles, goals, and traditions despite varied ancestry (e pluribus unum). (P, S)
      4. Understand the significance of the Statue of Liberty and how many people have come to the United States, and continue to come here, from all around the world. (I, P, S)

      Examples

      • Students invite their families and/or caregivers to share their family traditions, customs, and folklore with the class or school, which might include wearing special clothing, teaching students a song, preparing a typical food dish, narrating a folktale, demonstrating a craft, etc. (2.5.2).
      • Students read and discuss the following books: Lily and Miss Liberty, by Carla Stevens, and The Story of the Statue of Liberty, by Betsy Maestro (2.5.4).
    • 2.6. Broad Concept: Students describe the North American landscape, indigenous adaptations to it, and modifications to it.

      Students:

      1. Explain the differences between native groups in different parts of North America. (S)
      2. Describe how their organization corresponded to the environment. (G, S)
      3. Reconstruct the daily life of a person in several native societies. (E, S)

      Examples

      • Students learn about the Rumisen Ohlone peoples of the Silicone Valley and read When the World Ended; How Hummingbird Got Fire; How People Were Made — Rumisen Ohlone Stories, by Linda Yamane. Students discuss how the environment helped the Rumisen Ohlone peoples develop their folklore (2.6.2).
  • In addition to the standards for kindergarten through grade 2, students demonstrate the following intellectual, reasoning, reflection, and research skills:

    • Chronology and Cause and Effect

      1. Students place key events and people of the historical era they are studying in a chronological sequence and within a spatial context.
      2. Students correctly apply terms related to time (e.g., past, present, future, years, decades, centuries, millennia, epochs, and generations).
    • Geographic Skills

      1. Students use map and globe skills to determine the locations of places.
      2. Students identify the human and physical characteristics of the places they are studying.
      3. Students develop spatial ability by drawing sketch maps of the local community, regions of the United States, and major regions of the world.
    • Historical Research, Evidence, and Point of View

      1. Students analyze societies in terms of the following themes: military, political, economic, social, religious, and intellectual.
      2. Students pose relevant questions about events they encounter in historical documents.
      3. Students distinguish fact from fiction.
      4. Students use nontext primary and secondary sources, such as maps, charts, graphs, photographs, works of art, and technical charts.
 
Content