Teaching Materials
Ask a Master Teacher
Lesson Plan Gateway
Lesson Plan Reviews
State Standards
Teaching Guides
Digital Classroom
Ask a Digital Historian
Tech for Teachers
Beyond the Chalkboard
History Content
Ask a Historian
Beyond the Textbook
History Content Gateway
History in Multimedia
Museums and Historic Sites
National Resources
Quiz
Website Reviews
Issues and Research
Report on the State of History Education
Research Briefs
Roundtables
Best Practices
Examples of Historical Thinking
Teaching in Action
Teaching with Textbooks
Using Primary Sources
TAH Projects
Lessons Learned
Project Directors Conference
Project Spotlight
TAH Projects
About
Staff
Partners
Technical Working Group
Research Advisors
Teacher Representatives
Privacy
Quiz Rules
Blog
Outreach
Teaching History.org logo and contact info

Colorado: Kindergarten Standards

CO.1. Standard: History

  • CO.1.1. Concepts and skills students master:

    • Ask questions, share information and discuss ideas about the past

    Evidence Outcomes

    Students can:
    • a. Ask questions about the past using question starters. Questions to include but not limited to: What did? Where? When did? Which did? Who did? Why did? How did?
    • b. Identify information from narrative stories that answer questions about the past and add to our collective memory and history
    • c. Use correctly the word "because" in the context of personal experience or stories of the past using words. Words to include but not limited to past, present, future, change, first, next, last

    21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

    Inquiry Questions:
    1. How are lives of people from the past similar and different from our lives today?
    2. Why is it important to ask questions about the past?
    3. What is history?
    Relevance and Application:
    1. Individuals identify historical information in stories, photographs, buildings, and documents in their immediate surroundings such as movies, books, poems, paintings and other forms of art.
    2. The asking of questions about the past helps to understand the present and plan for the future. For example, newspaper reporters investigate the history of a topic in order to write a well-rounded piece.
    Nature of History:
    1. Historical thinkers ask questions to guide investigations of people, places, and events in the past.
  • CO.1.2. Concepts and skills students master:

    • The first component in the concept of chronology is to place information in sequential order

    Evidence Outcomes

    Students can:
    • a. Order sequence information using words. Words to include but not limited to past, present future, days, weeks, months, years, first, next, last, before, and after
    • b. Explore differences and similarities in the lives of children and families of long ago and today
    • c. Explain why knowing the order of events is important

    21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

    Inquiry Questions:
    1. Why is it important to know the order of events?
    2. Why do individuals use calendars and clocks?
    3. What happened yesterday and today, and what might happen tomorrow?
    4. How have you grown and changed over time?
    Relevance and Application:
    1. The recording of events in sequential order helps to create understanding and see relationships, understand cause and effect, and organize information. For example, scientists record information about experiments in sequential order so they can replicate them, and law enforcement re-creates timelines to find missing people
    2. Groups of individuals use similar tools for the organization of sequential information in order to communicate in a clear manner. For example, timelines use standard information such as date, time, month, and year for ease of communication.
    Nature of History:
    1. Historical thinkers use chronology to order information sequentially.

CO.2. Standard: Geography

  • CO.2.1. Concepts and skills students master:

    • People belong to different groups and live in different places around the world that can be found on a map or globe

    Evidence Outcomes

    Students can:
    • a. Compare and contrast how people live in different settings around the world
    • b. Give examples of food, clothing, and shelter and how they change in different environments
    • c. Distinguish between a map and a globe as ways to show places people live

    21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

    Inquiry Questions:
    1. What would it be like to live in another city, state, or country?
    2. Why do people belong to different groups?
    3. What makes a place special to the people who live there?
    Relevance and Application:
    1. People live in different settings and interact with their environment based on location. For example, people living in colder climates wear more clothes, and people in areas where there are floods live on higher ground or in houses on stilts.
    2. People belong to different groups throughout their lives including sports teams, hobby clubs, political, or religious groups.
    Nature of Geography:
    1. Spatial thinkers investigate other cultures and how they have been influenced by the climate, physical geography, and cultures of an area.

CO.3. Standard: Economics

  • CO.3.1. Concepts and skills students master:

    • Ownership as a component of economics

    Evidence Outcomes

    Students can:
    • a. Give examples of owner ship of different items
    • b. Recognize and give examples one person may want to use another’s object and that this requires asking permission and sharing

    21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

    Inquiry Questions:
    1. Can you show me who owns this (any item)?
    2. If you want to use someone else’s item what must you do?
    3. What happens when someone wants to use something that belongs to you?
    4. What do we do if there is not enough of something we all want?(scarcity)
    5. What are things that everyone collectively owns?
    Relevance and Application:
    1. Individuals interact with each other and the concept of ownership on a daily basis. For example, people purchase items for their use, donate items for others to use, and ask for permission to use someone else’s item.
    2. Technology is used to indicate and keep track of ownership. For example,pets may have microchips implanted and libraries use bar codes to keep track of their books.
    Nature of Economics:
    1. Economic thinkers study owner ship as a key principle of economics.
    2. Economic thinkers understand that some items are more desired than others and are more in demand.
  • CO.3.2. Concepts and skills students master:

    • Discuss how purchases can be made to meet wants and needs (PFL)

    Evidence Outcomes

    Students can:
    • a. Identify the difference between personal wants and needs
    • b. Give examples of the difference between spending income on something you want versus something you need

    21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

    Inquiry Questions:
    1. What are wants and needs?
    2. How do people balance between wants and needs?
    3. What is the difference between a want and a need?
    4. How can money help people to meet their wants and needs?
    Relevance and Application:
    1. Individuals make choices about purchasing to serve wants and needs. For example, parents pay bills prior to purchasing movie tickets or toys.
    Nature of Economics:
    1. Financially responsible individuals differentiate between needs and wants.

CO.4. Standard: Civics

  • CO.4.1. Concepts and skills students master:

    • Participate in making decisions using democratic traditions

    Evidence Outcomes

    Students can:
    • a. Explain why rules are needed
    • b. Create and follow classroom rules
    • c. Explain how a class rule promotes fairness and resolves conflict
    • d. Contribute to making and maintaining class community decisions
    • e. Give examples of the difference between democratic voting and decisions made by authorities including but not limited to the parent, teacher, or principal

    21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

    Inquiry Questions:
    1. What would it look like to have no rules?
    2. How can we solve conflict in a fair manner?
    3. Why do we consider voting fair?
    Relevance and Application:
    1. Rules help to ensure a safe society.For example, everyone wears seatbelts in the car and games have rules to create fairness.
    2. Decisions are made cooperatively. For example, families vote on which movie to see and classes vote to see what project they will do.
    Nature of Civics:
    1. Responsible community members take an active role in their communities.
    2. Responsible community members know the importance of participation in democratic societies.
    3. Responsible community members know the importance of fairness and conflict resolution.
  • CO.4.2. Concepts and skills students master:

    • Civic participation takes place in multiple groups

    Evidence Outcomes

    Students can:
    • a. Categorize examples of people and events that relate to civic participation
    • b. Give examples of qualities of a good citizen
    • c. Practice citizenship skills including courtesy, honesty, and fairness in working with others

    21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

    Inquiry Questions:
    1. What qualities make people good citizens?
    2. Why would people want to have friends from different groups?
    3. What can you do to be an active and helpful member of your class and school?
    Relevance and Application:
    1. The ability for civic participation differs with age and place. For example, children can volunteer and adults can run for elected office.
    2. Individual actions can make the community better.For example, people clean up the highways or volunteer in shelter
    Nature of Civics:
    1. Responsible community members exist across the globe and participation is influenced by cultural norms.
    2. Responsible community members study citizen participation and structures that bring security and stability to community life.
 
Content