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Colorado: 7th-Grade Standards

CO.1. Standard: History

Prepared Graduates:

  1. Develop an understanding of how people view, construct, and interpret history
  2. Analyze key historical periods and patterns of change over time within and across nations and cultures

CO.1.1. Concepts and skills students master:

  • Seek and evaluate multiple historical sources with different points of view to investigate a historical question and to formulate and defend a thesis with evidence

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Determine and explain the interdependence of people around the world during significant eras or events
  • b. Analyze historical sources for accuracy and point of view while formulating historical questions. Sources to include but not limited to art, artifacts, eyewitness accounts, letters and diaries, artifacts, real or simulated historical sites, charts, graphs, diagrams, and written texts

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. Why do people continue to research historical questions and events if books have already been written on the topic?
  2. How do historical thinkers defend a thesis using primary and secondary sources that reflect different viewpoints?
  3. How and why do historians determine periods of history?
  4. What can an artifact tell or not tell about a time period or event?
Relevance and Application:
  1. Individuals identify points of view, seek multiple sources, and develop and defend a thesis with evidence throughout life. For example, responsible citizens learn about the platforms and beliefs of candidates running for office prior to voting
  2. Technology is used to explore and evaluate accuracy of information. For example, editors check stories for accuracy and documentary film makers interview multiple individuals when making a movie.
  3. The use the context and content from the past is used to make connections to the present (e.g., the human settlement and trade route patterns)
Nature of History:
  1. Historical thinkers construct history through the gathering and analysis of historical sources.
  2. Historical thinkers construct the story of the past by interpreting events from multiple points of view and various perspectives.
  3. Historical thinkers defend a thesis with appropriate resources.

CO.1.2. Concepts and skills students master:

  • The historical eras, individuals, groups, ideas and themes within regions of the Eastern Hemisphere and their relationships with one another

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Explain how people interact and are interconnected over key periods or eras in history in the Eastern Hemisphere
  • b. Determine and explain the historical context of key people, events, and ideas over time and include the examination of different perspectives from people involved
  • c. Describe the foundation and development of key historical topics. Topics to include but not limited to early civilizations, Greece, Rome, ancient China and ancient African civilizations, and the Medieval World incorporating the Crusades and Feudalism
  • Analyze the social, political, cultural, economic, and technological development within the topics listed in above in evidence outcome "c"
  • Describe the history, interactions, and contributions of various peoples and cultures that have lived in or migrated to the Eastern Hemisphere. Topics to include but not limited to world religions, the Silk Road, East/West contact and settlement patterns

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. How does the rise or collapse of a government affect surrounding societies over time?
  2. What ideas have fundamentally changed different cultures in the Eastern Hemisphere?
  3. What are the factors that influenced the development of civilizations and nations?
  4. To what extent are ideas from ancient Greece, Rome, China, and Africa important in today’s world?
Relevance and Application:
  1. Historical information and context are used to interpret, evaluate, and inform current decisions or policies. For example, architects use ancient designs to influence their designs and advertisers use historical references in their ads to create context and meaning.
  2. Historical philosophies and ideas continue to inform and affect the present. For example, democracy continues to evolve from its Greek origins and cultural traditions change and evolve with global interaction.
  3. Technological developments continue to evolve and affect the present. For example, the speed of communication is almost instantaneous with blogs and the Internet.
Nature of History:
  1. Historical thinkers analyze patterns and themes throughout time.
  2. Historical thinkers construct history using a variety of sources.
  3. Historical thinkers interpret history from various points of view.
  4. Historical thinkers use chronology to organize time.
  5. Historical thinkers examine data for point of view, historical context, and propaganda.

CO.2. Standard: Geography

Prepared Graduates:

  1. Develop spatial understanding, perspectives, and personal connections to the world
  2. Examine places and regions and the connections among them

CO.2.1. Concepts and skills students master:

  • Use geographic tools to gather data and make geographic inferences and predictions

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Interpret maps and other geographic tools to find patterns in human and physical systems
  • b. Describe the characteristics and distribution of physical systems, cultural patterns and economic interdependence to make predictions. Topics to include but not limited to environmental issues and cultural diffusion
  • c. Collect and analyze data to make geographic inferences and predictions regarding the Eastern Hemisphere
  • d. Ask and answer questions after examining geographic sources

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. How would the world be different if we had no maps?
  2. How could geographic data be used for both positive and negative results?
  3. Why do so many maps of the world put North America in the center?
Relevance and Application:
  1. Geographic tools and the data they represent help businesses make decisions regarding location such as the best location for a business or the next Olympics.
  2. Geography and technology enable the ability to make predictions about such topics as population expansion and need for services.
Nature of Geography:
  1. Spatial thinkers use geographic tools to discover and investigate geographic patterns.
  2. Spatial thinkers use knowledge about the environment to study its influence on individuals and groups.

CO.2.2. Concepts and skills students master:

  • Regions have different issues and perspectives

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Classify data to construct thematic maps and make inferences
  • b. Analyze and interpret data using geographic tools and create maps
  • c. Construct maps using fundamental principles to identify key information and analyze regional issues and perspectives in the Eastern Hemisphere
  • d. Explain how the physical environment of a place influences its economy, culture, and trade patterns

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. Why do geographers use a variety of maps to represent the world?
  2. How can a location be indifferent regions at the same time?
  3. How do regional issues affect larger areas?
  4. Do regions with similar issues around the world have similar geographic characteristics?
Relevance and Application:
  1. Individuals and businesses understand the characteristics of a region and its needs. For example, a snowmobile business should not be located in the South and restaurants reflect regional tastes in foods.
  2. Regional access to resources affects individual perceptions, what they value, and how they react. For example, water consumption may be based on availability.
  3. Nations use geographic information about human and physical systems to make decisions such as establishing trade routes, locating cities, trade centers and capitals, and establishing outposts and security systems like forts and walls.
Nature of Geography:
  1. Spatial thinkers study cultural groups in order to explain how they view a region.
  2. Spatial thinkers evaluate the use of resources in a region to predict and propose
    future uses.
  3. Spatial thinkers study the various definitions of regions.

CO.3. Standard: Economics

Prepared Graduates:

  1. Understand the allocation of scarce resources in societies through analysis of individual choice, market interaction, and public policy
  2. Acquire the knowledge and economic reasoning skills to make sound financial decisions (PFL)

CO.3.1. Concepts and skills students master:

  • Supply and demand influence price and profit in a market economy

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Define supply and demand
  • b. Identify factors that cause changes in supply and demand
  • c. Define and identify factors that impact price
  • d. Identify examples to illustrate that consumers ultimately determine what is produced in a market economy
  • e. Explain the function of profit in a market economy
  • f. Demonstrate how supply and demand determine equilibrium price and quantity

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. How do consumers determine what is produced?
  2. What happens if a good or service is overpriced?
  3. When goods and services are scarce what might happen to price? Why?
  4. What happens to price when resources become more plentiful?
Relevance and Application:
  1. The principle of supply and demand is used to succeed in business.
  2. Technology is used as a tool to support global trade in a market economy.For example, bar coding allows companies to keep close track of inventory and sales projections are used to make predictions regarding production.
  3. Individual choices affect supply and demand.
  4. Natural disasters, politics, financial issues, and trade affect supply and demand.
Nature of Economics:
  1. Economic thinkers study the effects of local and global supply and demand on the local economy.
  2. Economic thinkers study the relationship between local consumers and local and global producers.
  3. Economic thinkers study the effects of different types of economies on global interdependence.
  4. Economic thinkers investigate consequences and trends related to global trade.

CO.3.2. Concepts and skills students master:

  • The distribution of resources influences economic production and individual choices (PFL)

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Give examples that illustrate connections between resources and manufacturing
  • b. Identify patterns of trade between places based on distribution of resources
  • c. Compare and contrast the relative value and different uses of several types of resources
  • d. Use supply and demand analysis to explain how prices allocate scarce goods in a market economy
  • e. Define resources from an economic and personal finance perspective
  • f. Explain the role of taxes in economic production and distribution of resources (PFL)
  • g. Define the various types of taxes students will pay as adults (PFL)
  • h. Demonstrate the impact of taxes on individual income and spending (PFL)

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. How is it advantageous and disadvantageous when a country hasvaluable resources located within its borders?
  2. How does a country acquire resources it does not have?
  3. How does the availability or the lack of resources influence production and distribution?
  4. What would countries look like without taxes?
Relevance and Application:
  1. Various factors that influence production, including resources, supply and demand, and price (PFL), affect individual consumer choices over time.
  2. Technology is used to explore relationships of economic factors and issues related to individual consumers.
  3. Analysis of the distribution and location of resources helps businesses to determine business practices such as large companies locating near transportation.
Nature of Economics:
  1. Economic thinkers analyze factors impacting production, distribution, and consumption.
  2. Economic thinkers gather data regarding trends in production, use of resources, and consumer choices.
  3. Financially responsible individuals understand the purposes of and responsibility to pay various taxes such as property, income and sales.

CO.4. Standard: Civics

Prepared Graduates:

  1. Analyze origins, structure, and functions of governments and their impacts on societies and citizens
  2. Analyze and practice rights, roles, and responsibilities of citizens

CO.4.1. Concepts and skills students master:

  • Compare how various nations define the rights, responsibilities, and roles of citizens

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Compare the definition of citizen in various governments
  • b. List the responsibilities of citizens in various governments
  • c. Define the roles of citizens in various governments
  • d. Give national and international examples of ethics and quality in government policies and practices
  • e. Give examples illustrating how various governments and citizens interact and analyze how these interactions have changed over time

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. What are fundamental human rights?
  2. How can the definition of citizen change?
  3. What is the purpose of government?
  4. What roles of citizens are the most important?
Relevance and Application:
  1. The comparison of how different nations define the rights, responsibilities and roles of their citizens helps to understand the actions and reactions of various nations and their citizens to current events. For example, groups in France and Italy freely demonstrate while demonstrations in China are less frequent.
Nature of Civics:
  1. Responsible community members exercise their rights, responsibilities, and roles.
  2. Responsible community members understand that rights, responsibilities, and roles of citizens are different over time and in various nations.

CO.4.2. Concepts and skills students master:

  • Different forms of government and international organizations and their influence in the world community

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Compare different forms of government in the world and how they derive their authority
  • b. Evaluate how various nations interact, resolve their differences, and cooperate
  • c. Analyze conflicts among nations including causes and consequences
  • d. Describe common interests and evaluate examples of global collaboration
  • e. Use criteria that identify the attributes of a good government and apply to specific examples

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. How do international laws and organizations help encourage ethical governmental practices?
  2. How do the aggressive actions of a nation influence other nations and international organizations?
  3. What leads to cooperation, competition, or aggression between and among nations?
  4. Why do governments form alliances and join international organizations?
Relevance and Application:
  1. The use of technology to research how various countries, their governments, and nongovernmental organizations work collaboratively to solve issues allows global participation in advocacy for beliefs. For example, scientists from different nations work together to help solve the global warming issues and charitable organizations send aid to areas of need.
  2. International organizations influence the world community to contribute or protect beliefs and interests. For example, the European Union was created for economic reasons, and the International Committee of the Red Cross was created to support people in crisis.
Nature of Civics:
  1. Responsible community members know the components of various systems of government.
  2. Responsible community members develop criteria to apply standards of ethics and quality in evaluating the effectiveness of government.
  3. Responsible community members understand the connections and complexities of interactions among nations.
 
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