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Colorado: 5th-Grade Standards

CO.1. Standard: History

Prepared Graduates:

  1. Develop an understanding of how people view, construct, and interpret history
  2. Analyze key historical periods and patterns of change over time within and across nations and cultures

CO.1.1. Concepts and skills students master:

  • Analyze historical sources from multiple points of view to develop an understanding of historical context

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Identify different ways of dating historical sources to understand historical context
  • b. Examine significant historical documents. Topics to include but not limited to the Stamp Act, the Declaration of Independence, and the Constitution
  • c. Create timelines of eras and themes in North America from 1491 through the American Revolution
  • d. Analyze cartoons, artifacts, artwork, charts, and graphs related to eras and themes in North America from 1491 through the American Revolution

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. How do sources with varied perspectives help us to understand what happened in the past?
  2. Why is it important to understand the historical context of events?
  3. How might history be different without the Declaration of Independence?
Relevance and Application:
  1. Historical information from multiple perspectives is used to interpret, evaluate, and inform; and make decisions and policies regarding various issues. For example, some accounts of the American Revolution refer to American patriots while others refer to American rebels.
  2. The historical method of inquiry allows individuals to continue to interpret and refine history. For example, political cartoonists portray multiple perspectives of events, and newspapers may be biased in coverage of events throughout time.
Nature of History:
  1. Historical thinkers analyze and interpret primary and secondary sources to make inferences about various time periods and show cause-and-effect relationships.
  2. Historical thinkers seek people, places, and events that tell the story of history from multiple perspectives.
  3. Historical thinkers examine data for point of view, historical context, distortion, or propaganda.

CO.1.2. Concepts and skills students master:

  • The historical eras, individuals, groups, ideas, and themes in North America from 1491 through the founding of the United States government

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Identify and explain cultural interactions between 1491 and the American Revolution. Topics to include but not limited to the Columbian Exchange, the interactions between Europeans and native Americans in the 17th and 18th centuries, and the developing relationship between Europeans and enslaved Africans
  • b. Identify and describe the significant individuals and groups of Native Americans and European colonists before the American Revolution
  • c. Explain the development of political, social and economic institutions in the British American colonies
  • d. Explain important political, social, economic, and military developments leading to and during the American Revolution

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. What if Thomas Paine had not written Common Sense?
  2. How did historical events and individuals contribute to diversity in the United States?
  3. How did important American documents shape American beliefs and values?
  4. How have various individuals, groups, and ideas affected the development of Colorado?
  5. To what extent did individuals and their ideas contribute to the foundation of the United States government?
Relevance and Application:
  1. The context and information from the past are used to make connections and inform decisions in the present. For example, the concepts of liberty continue to be defended by lawyers and citizens while on topics to include but not limited to the rights and responsibilities of citizens continue to evolve through the work of policy makers, legislators, judges, lawyers, and individuals.
  2. Technological developments continue to evolve and affect the present in areas such as communication, transportation, and science.
Nature of History:
  1. Historical thinkers analyze patterns and themes throughout time.
  2. Historical thinkers use chronology to organize and study cause-and-effect relationships across time.
  3. Historical thinkers study people, places, and events to tell the story of history from multiple perspectives.

CO.2. Standard: Geography

Prepared Graduates:

  1. Develop spatial understanding, perspectives, and personal connections to the world
  2. Examine places and regions and the connections among them

CO.2.1. Concepts and skills students master:

  • Use various geographic tools and sources to answer questions about the geography of the United States

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Answer questions about regions of the United States using various types of maps
  • b. Use geographic tools to identify, locate, and describe places and regions in the United States and suggest reasons for their location
  • c. Locate resources in the United States and describe the influence of access on the development of local and regional communities

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. How can various types of maps and other geographic tools communicate geographic information incorrectly?
  2. How do you think differently about data when it is displayed spatially?
  3. How and why do we label places?
  4. How have places and regions in the United States been influenced by the physical geography of North America over time?
Relevance and Application:
  1. Geographic tools are used to locate places and identify resources, physical features, regions, and populations.
  2. People and organizations decided on specific locations for operations based on geographic information.
  3. Technologies enhance the ability to locate and analyze maps to answer questions. For example, historians use maps to help recreate settings of historical events, and individuals use maps to learn about different geographic areas.
Nature of Geography:
  1. Spatial thinkers recognize that information can be extrapolated from geographic tools.
  2. Spatial thinkers evaluate what data and geographic tools are needed to answer specific questions.

CO.2.2. Concepts and skills students master:

  • Causes and consequences of movement

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Identify variables associated with discovery, exploration, and migration
  • b. Explain migration, trade, and cultural patterns that result from interactions
  • c. Describe and analyze how specific
    physical and political features influenced historical events, movements, and adaptation to the environment
  • d. Analyze how cooperation and conflict among people contribute to political, economic, and social divisions in the United States
  • e. Give examples of the influence of geography on the history of the United States

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. What human and physical characteristics have motivated, prevented, or impeded migration and immigration over time?
  2. How can migration and immigration be represented geographically?
  3. How has the movement of people and their belongings affected the environment both positively and negatively?
Relevance and Application:
  1. Individuals understand the consequences and causes of movement to make connections to current personal or international events such as hurricane victims moving from storms, refugees fleeing from war, and economic hardship causing relocation for better jobs.
  2. Technology has influenced movement to, colonization of, and the settlement of North America. For example, the West was promoted as the place for economic prosperity. Transportation systems have influenced movement.
  3. Migration of individuals has multiple effects on society including economic and environmental impacts.
Nature of Geography:
  1. Spatial thinkers study patterns of human movement.
  2. Spatial thinkers analyze the push and pull components of movement.

CO.3. Standard: Economics

Prepared Graduates:

  1. Understand the allocation of scarce resources in societies through analysis of individual choice, market interaction, and public policy
  2. Acquire the knowledge and economic reasoning skills to make sound financial decisions (PFL)

CO.3.1. Concepts and skills students master:

  • Government and market structures influence financial institutions

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Define a capitalist market economy
  • b. Identify governmental activities that affect financial institutions and the economy at the local, state, and national level

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. Why are there different types of financial institutions?
  2. In a market economy, who has the most power?
  3. What influence should government have on the economy and financial institutions?
Relevance and Application:
  1. Knowledge about the role of financial institutions in a market economy allows individuals and businesses to better prepare for financial security. For example, financial analysts monitor the banking industry; individuals can evaluate the services and costs of banking with various institutions; and businesses can borrow money to expand.
  2. Government actions affect the services and policies of financial institutions, thereby affecting financial options for individuals.
Nature of Economics:
  1. Economic thinkers analyze the actions of financial institutions in a market economy.

CO.3.2. Concepts and skills students master:

  • Use of financial institutions to manage personal finances (PFL)

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Identify different financial institutions
  • b. Identify the products and services of financial institutions to include but not limited to: checking accounts, savings accounts, investments, and loans
  • c. Compare and contrast financial institutions, their products, and services

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. What factors are important when establishing savings or investments goals?
  2. What risks and benefits are associated with spending versus saving and investing?
  3. How can a checking account help to decide how to spend and save?
  4. Why do people use financial institutions and not self-banking?
  5. How do people choose a financial institution?
  6. Why do people need income?
Relevance and Application:
  1. Analysis of the benefits and risks of investing and saving with virtual and brick and mortar financial institutions helps to make informed financial decisions.
  2. Evaluation of the opportunity costs help to make financial decisions.
  3. Technology is used to track and graph the interest accrued on a virtual investments, checking and savings accounts, investments, and loans.
Nature of Economics:
  1. Financially responsible individuals make informed decisions about saving and investing for short- and long-term goals.
  2. Financially responsible individuals research, analyze, and make choices regarding their needs when using financial institutions.

CO.4. Standard: Civics

Prepared Graduates:

  1. Analyze origins, structure, and functions of governments and their impacts on societies and citizens
  2. Analyze and practice rights, roles, and responsibilities of citizens

CO.4.1. Concepts and skills students master:

  • The foundations of citizenship in the United States

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Describe and provide sources and examples of individual rights
  • b. Give examples of group and individual actions that illustrate civic ideals in the founding of the United States. Ideals to include but not limited to freedom, rules of law, equality, civility, cooperation, respect, responsibility, and civic participation
  • c. Explain the reasons for the settlement of the American colonies
  • d. Define the criteria and process for becoming a citizen

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. How might citizens view an issue differently because of their backgrounds?
  2. What is the most important right of a citizen?
  3. What is the most important responsibility of a citizen?
  4. How does government meet its responsibility to citizens?
  5. Who is government?
Relevance and Application:
  1. Actions illustrate civic virtues such as civility, cooperation, respect, and responsible participation and are foundational components of our society. Examples include peaceful assembly by groups and respectful behavior during a performance or speech.
  2. Knowledge of the foundations of citizenship in the United States ensures that citizens’ rights are being protected. For example, the rule of law applies to everyone in society and all individuals and groups are treated with respect.
Nature of Civics:
  1. Responsible community members analyze critical historical documents to investigate the development of the national government.
  2. Responsible community members understand the responsibilities of the national government to its citizens.

CO.4.2. Concepts and skills students master:

  • The origins, structure, and functions of the United States government

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Identify political principles of American democracy and how the Constitution and Bill of Rights reflect and preserve these principles
  • b. Explain the historical foundation and the events that led to the formation of the United States constitutional government. Topics to include but not limited to the colonial experience, the Declaration of Independence, and the Articles of Confederation
  • c. Explain the origins, structure, and functions of the three branches of United States government and the relationships among them
  • d. Describe how the decisions of the national government affect local and state government

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. What are democratic ideals and practices and their historic origins?
  2. Were the founding fathers correct in keeping the Constitution open for flexibility and interpretation? Why?
  3. How have historical documents defined and distributed power?
Relevance and Application:
  1. The origins, structure, and function of the United States government are studied to create an informed, civically literate, and responsible society. For example, fundamental principles and liberties are still evolving as judges interpret the Constitution, and legislators make laws and local city councils and boards create regulations
Nature of Civics:
  1. Responsible community members understand the concept of individual rights as a cornerstone to American democracy.
  2. Responsible community members understand the relationships between individual rights and personal responsibility.
 
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