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Colorado: 1st-Grade Standards

CO.1. Standard: History

  • CO.1.1. Concepts and skills students master:

    • Describe patterns and chronological order of events of the recent past

    Evidence Outcomes

    Students can:
    • a. Arrange life events in chronological order
    • b. Identify the components of a calendar. Topics to include but not limited to days of the week, months, and notable events
    • c. Identify past events using a calendar
    • d. Use words related to time, sequence, and change

    21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

    Inquiry Questions:
    1. Why is it important to know the order of events?
    2. How are current patterns similar to and different from those experienced by people who lived in a community in the past?
    Relevance and Application:
    1. Events are recorded in sequential order to increase understanding, see relationships, understand cause and effect, and organize information. For example, scientists record information about experiments in sequential order so they can replicate them, and law enforcement re-creates timelines to find missing people or solve crimes.
    2. Groups of individuals use similar tools for the organization of sequential information in order to communicate in a clear manner.
    Nature of History:
    1. Historical thinkers understand the importance of comparing and contrasting in identifying patterns and trends.
    2. Historical thinkers use chronology to sequence events.
  • CO.1.2. Concepts and skills students master:

    • Family and cultural traditions in the United States in the past

    Evidence Outcomes

    Students can:
    • a. Identify similarities and differences between themselves and others
    • b. Discuss common and unique characteristics of different cultures using multiple sources of information
    • c. Identify famous Americans from the past who have shown courageous leadership
    • d. Identify and explain the meaning of American national symbols. Symbols to include but not limited to the American flag, bald eagle, Statue of Liberty, Uncle Sam, the Capitol, and the White House

    21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

    Inquiry Questions:
    1. What are national symbols and their relationship to traditions in the United States?
    2. What are family and cultural traditions and how have they changed over time?
    3. How have individuals made a difference in their community?
    Relevance and Application:
    1. The understanding of family and cultural traditions informs decisions and creates knowledge that is used throughout life. For example, Uncle Sam is used by political cartoonists to represent the United States.
    2. Knowledge of cultural traditions of various groups helps to gain insight, have new experiences, and collaboratively interact with society. For example, bowing is a sign of respect that American businesspersons would use when working in Japan.
    Nature of History:
    1. Historical thinkers understand the importance of comparing and contrasting in identifying patterns and trends.
    2. Historical thinkers use chronology to sequence events.

CO.2. Standard: Geography

  • CO.2.1. Concepts and skills students master:

    • Geographic tools such as maps and globes represent places

    Evidence Outcomes

    Students can:
    • a. Explain that maps and globes are different representations of Earth
    • b. Use terms related to directions—forward and backward, left and right—and distance—near and far—when describing locations
    • c. Recite address including city, state, and country and explain how those labels help find places on a map
    • d. Distinguish between land and water on a map or globe
    • e. Create simple maps showing both human and natural features

    21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

    Inquiry Questions:
    1. How would an individual describe how to get somewhere without an address?
    2. What if we had no geographic tools?
    3. How could a flat map truly represent a round globe?
    4. Why do people not carry globes to help find their way?
    Relevance and Application:
    1. People use geographic terms, tools, and technology in work and play to describe and find places. For example, pilots use maps to make flight plans, hikers use compasses to determine directions, and vacationers use maps to find unfamiliar places.
    2. Individuals create and memorize addresses to help locate places. For example, knowing an address is necessary for an ambulance to find it or for an individual to receive mail.
    Nature of Geography:
    1. Spatial thinkers use geographic tools to study and represent places.
  • CO.2.2. Concepts and skills students master:

    • People in different groups and communities interact with each other and with the environment

    Evidence Outcomes

    Students can:
    • a. Identify examples of boundaries that affect family and friends
    • b. Give examples of how people use and interrelate with Earth’s resources
    • c. Identify how community activities differ due to physical and cultural characteristics
    • d. Give examples of how schools and neighborhoods in different places are alike and different
    • e. Identify cultural and family traditions and their connections to other groups and the environment

    21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

    Inquiry Questions:
    1. How are places like communities similar to and different from where you live?
    2. How do people celebrate traditions?
    3. What celebration or tradition would you create?
    4. How do people use resources in the local community?
    5. How do individuals in the community use the environment?
    Relevance and Application:
    1. Maps change over time.
    2. People from various cultures are both similar and different and these differences are reflected in clothing, language, culture influencing social interactions.
    3. Boundaries and the need for boundaries affect everyday life. For example, boundary lines determine who owns a piece of property.
    Nature of Geography:
    1. Spatial thinkers study resources, their availability, and use as a key to understanding human interactions with their environment and each other.
    2. Spatial thinkers study human and environmental interactions and consequences of those interactions.

CO.3. Standard: Economics

  • CO.3.1. Concepts and skills students master:

    • People work at different types of jobs and in different types of organizations to produce goods and services and receive an income

    Evidence Outcomes

    Students can:
    • a. Give examples of different types of business and the goods and services they produce for the community
    • b. Give examples of types of jobs people in your family have
    • c. Recognize that people have a choice about what kinds of jobs they do

    21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

    Inquiry Questions:
    1. What kinds of jobs do people that you know perform?
    2. Where do they go to do those jobs?
    3. Why do people choose different jobs?
    4. What do workers receive for their work?
    5. What types of businesses are in the community?
    6. What is the difference between income and money?
    Relevance and Application:
    1. Different forms of technology are used to perform jobs such as scanners for the market checkers, GIS for geographers, machines for industrial work, and computers in offices.
    2. Individuals make decisions about careers or jobs based on factors such as education, skills, and interests.
    Nature of Economics:
    1. Economic thinkers investigate the influence of different jobs and businesses in their community.
    2. Economic thinkers study the choices about what kinds of jobs people perform.
  • CO.3.2. Concepts and skills students master:

    • Identify short-term financial goals (PFL)

    Evidence Outcomes

    Students can:
    • a. Define a short-term financial goal
    • b. Identify examples of short-term financial goals
    • c. Discuss sources of income needed to meet short-term goals such as but not limited to gifts, borrowing, allowances, and income

    21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

    Inquiry Questions:
    1. How does an individual earn money to meet a goal?
    2. Why do people donate to charity?
    3. How does an individual know a good short-term goal?
    4. Why is personal financial goal setting important?
    Relevance and Application:
    1. Short-term financial goals can be met through planning. For example, an individual divides income between current expenses, saving for the future, and philanthropic donations.
    2. Individuals and organizations track their progress toward meeting short-term financial goals. For example, the food bank creates a chart tracking how much food has been donated toward reaching its goal.
    Nature of Economics:
    1. Financially responsible individuals create goals and work toward meeting them.
    2. Financially responsible individuals understand the cost and the accountability associated with borrowing.

CO.4. Standard: Civics

  • CO.4.1. Concepts and skills students master:

    • Effective groups have responsible leaders and team members

    Evidence Outcomes

    Students can:
    • a. Describe the characteristics of responsible leaders
    • b. Identify the attributes of a responsible team member
    • c. Demonstrate the ability to be both a leader and team member

    21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

    Inquiry Questions:
    1. How do you know if you are a responsible team member?
    2. How do you know if you are a responsible leader?
    3. What qualities make a responsible leader and can they change?
    4. How do you know when you are working with an effective team?
    Relevance and Application:
    1. Groups work as a team toward a collective goal that honors the views of its members. For example, a family decides to save money toward a vacation or a student cleans the house to help the family.
    2. Good leadership skills involve being able to plan, collaborate, investigate, listen, and problem solve. For example, teachers listen to the needs of students when trying to make a decision about what is best for the class and a student is able to help mediate a conflict between two friends.
    Nature of Civics:
    1. Responsible community members know how to be a good leader and good team member.
  • CO.4.2. Concepts and skills students master:

    • Notable people, places, holidays and patriotic symbols

    Evidence Outcomes

    Students can:
    • a. Give examples of notable leaders of different communities leaders to include but not limited to the president, mayor, governor, and law enforcement
    • b. Give examples of various patriotic symbols to include but not limited to the flag, bald eagle, Uncle Sam, and the national anthem
    • c. Identify significant places. Places to include but not limited to the Statue of Liberty, Capitol, White House, and important community sites
    • d. Identify significant civic holidays
    • e. Identify the American flag and the Colorado flag

    21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

    Inquiry Questions:
    1. Why do we have national, community, and local celebrations and holidays?
    2. Who are important people in the development of our country?
    3. How are new national symbols, songs, or holidays created?
    Relevance and Application:
    1. Symbols, songs, holidays, traditions, places, and people help to provide identity for the community and nation. For example, the Pledge of Allegiance is said on various occasions, individuals may salute the flag of their country, and patriotic songs are sung at sporting events and July 4th parades celebrate our nation’s independence.
    Nature of Civics:
    1. Responsible community members understand the responsibilities of being a member of a community.
    2. Responsible community members see communities as multi-dimensional entities.
    3. Responsible community members investigate responsibility as a central part of group membership.
 
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