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Arkansas: 6th-Grade Standards

  • AR.G. Strand / Content Standard: Geography

    • G.1. Standard / Student Learning Expectation: Physical and Spatial

      Students shall develop an understanding of the physical and spatial characteristics and applications of geography.

      • G.1.6.1. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Location, Place, and Region

        Apply the proper usage of absolute and relative location.

      • G.1.6.2. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Location, Place, and Region

        Examine the location, place, and region of Arkansas and determine the characteristics of each.

      • G.1.6.3. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Location, Place, and Region

        Identify the countries on the continent of North America and analyze their geographical relationship.

      • G.1.6.4. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Location, Place, and Region

        Explain the importance of the major river systems of the United States and Arkansas: Arkansas River, Colorado River, Mississippi River, Ohio River, and St. Lawrence River.

      • G.1.6.5. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Location, Place, and Region

        Illustrate information relating to population, climate, weather patterns, or other specific topics on selected types of charts or graphs.

      • G.1.6.6. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Location, Place, and Region

        Analyze a map of the fifty states and identify regions (e.g., Northeast, Southeast, Midwest, Southwest, West).

      • G.1.6.7. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Map and Globe Skills

        Examine different maps and globe projections and recognize the differences of each map or projection.

      • G.1.6.8. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Map and Globe Skills

        Construct a map of the United States using all basic map components: compass rose, map scale, legend/key, inset map, and title.

      • G.1.6.9. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Map and Globe Skills

        Compare the location of specific places on both maps and globes.

      • G.1.6.10. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Map and Globe Skills

        Discuss reasons for the location of political boundaries and capital cities due to physical features of the nation or states

    • G.2. Standard / Student Learning Expectation: Culture and Diversity

      Students shall develop an understanding of how cultures around the world develop and change.

      • G.2.6.1. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Culture/Diversity

        Examine the effects of the contributions of people from selected racial, ethnic, and religious groups to the cultural identify of Arkansas and the United States.

      • G.2.6.2. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Culture/Diversity

        Describe how people from selected racial, ethnic, and religious groups attempt to maintain their cultural heritage while adapting to the culture of Arkansas and the United States.

      • G.2.6.3. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Culture/Diversity

        Identify the occurrences of cultural diffusion, cultural exchange, and assimilation in local and national history

    • G.3. Standard / Student Learning Expectation: Interaction of People and the Environment

      Students shall develop an understanding of the interactions between people and their environment.

      • G.3.6.1. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Movement

        Describe the location of major cities in Arkansas and the United States and the availability of resources and transportation in those areas.

      • G.3.6.2. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Movement

        Distinguish between push-pull factors.

      • G.3.6.3. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Movement

        Compare methods of communication through present day technology.

      • G.3.6.4. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Movement

        Distinguish between interstate and intrastate transportation and the effects globalization has on these methods of transportation.

      • G.3.6.5. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Human Environment Interaction

        Describe the physical processes that produce renewable and nonrenewable resources.

      • G.3.6.6. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Human Environment Interaction

        Describe ways in which technology influences capacity to modify the physical environment.

      • G.3.6.7. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Human Environment Interaction

        Analyze the consequences of environmental modification on Arkansas and specific areas of the United States: acid rain, global warming, ozone depletion, erosion, and desertification.

  • AR.C. Strand / Content Standard: Civics

    • C.4. Standard / Student Learning Expectation: Government

      Students shall develop an understanding of the forms and roles of government.

      • C.4.6.1. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Forms and Roles of Government

        Compare and contrast the three branches of government at the state and national levels of government: executive, legislative, and judicial.

      • C.4.6.2. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Forms and Roles of Government

        Discuss the system of checks and balances in government.

      • C.4.6.3. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Forms and Roles of Government

        Discuss the roles and responsibilities of the executive branch (e.g., state/governor, federal/president).

      • C.4.6.4. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Forms and Roles of Government

        Compare and contrast the roles of the legislative branch (e.g., general assembly/congress, state congress and federal congress, house, senate).

      • C.4.6.5. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Forms and Roles of Government

        Compare and contrast the roles of the judicial branch (e.g., local, state, and federal).

      • C.4.6.6. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Forms and Roles of Government

        Discuss the forms of government (e.g., democracy, monarchy, dictatorship, oligarchy, totalitarian).

      • C.4.6.7. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Forms and Roles of Government

        Recognize elected state and federal government officials (e.g., terms and qualifications) .

      • C.4.6.8. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Forms and Roles of Government

        Discuss the succession of leadership at the federal level.

      • C.4.6.9. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Forms and Roles of Government

        Describe the development of the two-party system and the influence of third parties.

    • C.5. Standard / Student Learning Expectation: Citizenship

      Students shall develop an understanding of how to participate, develop, and use the skills necessary for effective citizenship.

      • C.5.6.1. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Roots of Democracy

        Determine the way rights and laws of the United States were created by examining founding documents (e.g., Declaration of Independence, United States Constitution, Mayflower Compact).

      • C.5.6.2. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Roots of Democracy

        Examine the effects of the Declaration of Independence.

      • C.5.6.3. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Roots of Democracy

        Evaluate reasons for writing the United States Constitution.

      • C.5.6.4. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Roots of Democracy

        Evaluate the importance of the United States Constitution as a governing document for the United States.

      • C.5.6.5. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Roots of Democracy

        Research national symbols and movements using primary and secondary sources (e.g., Uncle Sam, political party symbols, Vietnam Memorial, Mt. Rushmore).

      • C.5.6.6. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Roots of Democracy

        Analyze significant examples of music from various periods of United States history.

      • C.5.6.7. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Rights and Responsibilities of Citizens

        Examine the process of becoming a citizen of the United States.

      • C.5.6.8. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Rights and Responsibilities of Citizens

        Evaluate ways being a good citizen is important for every individual (e.g., voting, obeying laws, volunteerism).

      • C.5.6.9. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Rights and Responsibilities of Citizens

        Examine ways citizens utilize the rights guaranteed in the Bill of Rights.

      • C.5.6.10. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Rights and Responsibilities of Citizens

        Examine the importance of the procedure for voting in the United States and in Arkansas (e.g., registration, maintaining the right to vote, voicing opinion).

      • C.5.6.11. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Rights and Responsibilities of Citizens

        Analyze the importance of citizen participation in government at the state and local level.

      • C.5.6.12. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Rights and Responsibilities of Citizens

        Examine the rights guaranteed to United States citizens in the Bill of Rights.

      • C.5.6.13. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Rights and Responsibilities of Citizens

        Compare U.S. Constitutional Amendments granting citizen's rights.

      • C.5.6.14. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Rights and Responsibilities of Citizens

        Examine how citizens' rights are exercised through organizations that influenced societal and governmental change (e.g., ACLU, NAACP, CORE, ERA).

  • AR.H. Strand / Content Standard: History

    • H.6. Standard / Student Learning Expectation: History

      Students shall analyze significant ideas, events, and people in world, national, state, and local history and how they affect change over time.

      • H.6.6.1. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Continuity and Change

        Determine the meaning of various political cartoons.

      • H.6.6.2. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Continuity and Change

        Create/construct timelines using the terms: ca (circa), Before Common Era/Common Era (BCE/CE), millennia, millennium, decade, and century.

      • H.6.6.3. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Continuity and Change

        Define and discuss post-Civil War Reconstruction from a state and national perspective.

      • H.6.6.4. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Continuity and Change

        Discuss the impact of Manifest Destiny on the United States.

      • H.6.6.5. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Continuity and Change

        Research early 20th century inventions and their impact on Americans (e.g., telephone, electricity, automobile).

      • H.6.6.6. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Continuity and Change

        Explain the impact of the American industrial revolution: communications and mass production.

      • H.6.6.7. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Continuity and Change

        Analyze the impact of World War I on daily life in the United States (e.g., prohibition, food distribution, fuel distribution, propaganda).

      • H.6.6.8. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Continuity and Change

        Analyze the causes and effects of the Great Depression: Federal Reserve actions, farm prices, crop failures, stock market crash, and Roosevelt's New Deal.

      • H.6.6.9. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Continuity and Change

        Explain how the Women's Rights movement led to the Nineteenth Amendment.

      • H.6.6.10. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Continuity and Change

        Locate the countries who were part of the World War II Axis and Allied Powers.

      • H.6.6.11. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Continuity and Change

        Analyze the scientific and technological innovations that affected society in the mid to late 20th century: communication, technology, medicine, and transportation.

      • H.6.6.12. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Continuity and Change

        Identify major contributions and achievements of the US space program (e.g., Apollo 11, International Space Station).

      • H.6.6.13. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Conflict and Consensus

        Explain the conflict between the American Indians and settlers moving westward (e.g., Battle of Little Big Horn, American Indian Movement).

      • H.6.6.14. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Conflict and Consensus

        Explain the causes and effects of the Spanish American War (e.g., U.S. interest in imperial expansion, USS Maine, Yellow Journalism).

      • H.6.6.15. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Conflict and Consensus

        Describe the expanding role of the US in world affairs (e.g., Panama Canal).

      • H.6.6.16. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Conflict and Consensus

        Explain the events that led to the United States involvement in World War I (e.g., Zimmerman telegram, German U-boat activity).

      • H.6.6.17. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Conflict and Consensus

        Examine the Treaty of Versailles that ended World War I and the creation of the League of Nations.

      • H.6.6.18. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Conflict and Consensus

        Examine the events and political decisions that led to the United States involvement in World War II: Fascism, Nazism, Treaty of Versailles, and Great Depression.

      • H.6.6.19. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Conflict and Consensus

        Research the major events and political decisions made by the United States during the course of World War II: alliance with Great Britain and France, Pearl Harbor, atomic bomb, and relocation and internment of Japanese Americans.

      • H.6.6.20. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Conflict and Consensus

        Examine the events that led to the conclusion of World War II (e.g., Normandy, liberation of concentration camps, D-Day).

      • H.6.6.21. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Conflict and Consensus

        Explain the causes and effects of the Cold War in the United States: Chinese Cultural Revolution, McCarthyism, Cuban Missile Crisis, and arms race.

      • H.6.6.22. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Conflict and Consensus

        Examine the following components of the Civil Rights Movement: Freedom Riders, sit-ins, organized marches, boycotts, school integration, and Ku Klux Klan (KKK).

      • H.6.6.23. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Conflict and Consensus

        Explain segregation and desegregation as established by Supreme Court cases: Plessey v. Ferguson and Brown v. Board of Education.

      • H.6.6.24. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Conflict and Consensus

        Discuss the involvement of the United States in the Korean War.

      • H.6.6.25. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Conflict and Consensus

        Discuss the major causes and effects of the Vietnam War (e.g., spread of communism).

      • H.6.6.26. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Conflict and Consensus

        Discuss the ongoing conflicts between the United States and Southeast Asia and the Middle East.

      • H.6.6.27. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Conflict and Consensus

        Examine acts of modern-day terrorism (e.g., Oklahoma City bombing, World Trade Center attacks).

      • H.6.6.28. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Movement

        Describe the developments linking the east and west (e.g., Homestead Act, railroads, Pony Express, telegraph, cattle trails, and wagon trains).

      • H.6.6.29. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Movement

        Analyze the following components of immigration to the United States: push/pull factors and settlement patterns.

      • H.6.6.30. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Movement

        Explain the origins and accomplishments of labor unions.

      • H.6.6.31. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Movement

        Explain the migration of African Americans northward before and during the Civil Rights movement.

      • H.6.6.33. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Cultural Diversity and Uniformity

        Identify the cultural changes of the 1920s (e.g., Roaring Twenties, Jazz Age, fashion, Harlem Renaissance, talkies, flapper, Prohibition)).

      • H.6.6.34. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Cultural Diversity and Uniformity

        Explain the social changes caused by World War II: women in the workforce, baby boom, and G.I. Bill.

      • H.6.6.35. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Cultural Diversity and Uniformity

        Identify significant individuals whose lives impacted the Civil Rights movement (e.g., Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks, Stokely Carmichael, Medgar Evers, Little Rock Nine, Thurgood Marshall).

  • AR.E. Strand / Content Standard: Economics

    • E.7. Standard / Student Learning Expectation: Choices

      Students shall analyze the costs and benefits of making economic choices.

      • E.7.6.1. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Costs and Benefits

        Examine how the economic wants and needs of all people may or may not be fulfilled.

      • E.7.6.2. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Costs and Benefits

        Demonstrate an understanding that choices have both present and future consequences.

      • E.7.6.3. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Costs and Benefits

        Examine the causes of scarcity and the choices made due to scarcity.

      • E.7.6.4. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Costs and Benefits

        Explain that all decision making involves opportunity costs.

      • E.7.6.5. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Costs and Benefits

        Explain why federal, state, and local governments have to make choices because of limited resources.

      • E.7.6.6. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Costs and Benefits

        Discuss the decision making model to evaluate historical events.

      • E.7.6.7. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Costs and Benefits

        Examine examples of traditional, market, and command economies.

      • E.7.6.8. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Costs and Benefits

        Determine why trade-offs allow people to get the most from scarce resources.

      • E.7.6.9. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Costs and Benefits

        Discuss the characteristics of a free enterprise system.

    • E.8. Standard / Student Learning Expectation: Resources

      Students shall evaluate the use and allocation of human, natural, and capital resources.

      • E.8.6.1. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Factors of Production

        Analyze the impact of entrepreneurship in the development of the economy of the United States.

      • E.8.6.2. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Factors of Production

        Explain the result of increased productivity on an improved standard of living (e.g., assembly line, interchangeable parts, computers).

      • E.8.6.3. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Factors of Production

        Explain how owners of the factors of production receive payments for the use of these factors: wages and salaries, rent, interest, and profit.

      • E.8.6.4. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Factors of Production

        Evaluate the influences the discovery of natural resources has on the movement of people (e.g., gold, silver, oil).

    • E.9. Standard / Student Learning Expectation: Markets

      Students shall analyze the exchange of goods and services and the roles of governments, businesses, and individuals in the market place.

      • E.9.6.1. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Financial Markets

        Examine the characteristics of money: portability, divisibility, durability, and uniformity.

      • E.9.6.2. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Financial Markets

        Compare the various types of financial institutions that provide savings accounts: interest (rate of return) and safety.

      • E.9.6.3. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Financial Markets

        Determine the advantages and disadvantages of saving or spending money.

      • E.9.6.4. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Financial Markets

        Identify the purpose and function of the stock market.

      • E.9.6.5. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Financial Markets

        Discuss the effects of economic inflation on the economic system of the United States.

      • E.9.6.6. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Financial Markets

        Discuss how the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) measures the productivity of a nation.

      • E.9.6.7. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Financial Markets

        Explain the role of the Federal Reserve in the economy.

      • E.9.6.8. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Global Markets

        Examine the costs/benefits associated with the development of global trade.

      • E.9.6.9. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Global Markets

        Discuss various types of currency and their effects on the global economy.

      • E.9.6.10. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Goods and Services

        Examine changes in supply and demand and the resulting effect on prices.

      • E.9.6.11. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Goods and Services

        Discuss methods used to reduce or eliminate competition (e.g., trademarks, patents, copyrights, natural monopolies, government licenses).

      • E.9.6.12. Student Learning Expectation / Benchmark: Goods and Services

        Discuss the various marketing techniques: advertising, mail order catalog, and increasing demand for goods and services.

 
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