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Bringing American History Scholarship to the Classroom

The district will partner with Nebraska Wesleyan University (NWU) and the Nebraska State Historical Society to improve K-12 teachers' knowledge of U.S. history and develop skills aimed at boosting student achievement. Participants earn 12 hours of graduate credit from NWU for courses in Fundamentals of American History to and since 1877, a primary sources laboratory course, and History Alive I and II, covering research strategies and teaching tactics. National History Day, the Center for Civic Education, and Literacy Leaders Institute 2002 provide additional training on teaching strategies. Under a teacher-leader model, courses are free of charge, and participants will lead professional development sessions for peers. The project also provides training and study time to develop analytical tools and engage in research. Visiting scholars and workshops supplement courses. Supporting institutions include the Nebraska State Council for Social Studies and Nebraska Department of Education. Graduate courses cover fundamentals of American history before and after 1877, focusing first on the roots of American democracy and secondly, on leadership, issues and events bringing the U.S. to the 21st century.

 
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