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Flexible Grant Design

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Flexible Grant Design

1:23

Finding ways for teachers who again, are absolutely burdened and myopic in terms of what they have to do every day, to have different points of entry into the grant, so that it's not one size fits all. “Everybody's going to get this treatment, I hope you can join us.” But rather, here are four or five different pieces of the overall grant design and depending on your own interest, your own engagement, your own timeframe, the fact that, you know, your husband's in med school or you coach the baseball team, or whatever the case may be, that you can find a way to participate.

So finding those multiple entry levels and recognizing that some teachers, really all they have time for, right now, this year, this semester, is coming and listening to a provocative lecture. That's fine.

So finding those multiple entry levels and recognizing that some teachers, really all they have time for, right now, this year, this semester, is coming and listening to a provocative lecture. That's fine.

We've had in both grants over three-, three-and-a-half-year projects, consistently 50, 60, 75 teachers coming at the end of a school day. In both cases, some of them driving an hour after school to get there, staying until eight o’clock at night and driving an hour home, just literally to talk about history. And I think there's value to that. I think there's something to be said for exposure and for conversation and for that sense of a feeling that they're staying on top of a current trend.

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