Teaching Materials
Ask a Master Teacher
Lesson Plan Gateway
Lesson Plan Reviews
State Standards
Teaching Guides
Digital Classroom
Ask a Digital Historian
Tech for Teachers
Beyond the Chalkboard
History Content
Ask a Historian
Beyond the Textbook
History Content Gateway
History in Multimedia
Museums and Historic Sites
National Resources
Quiz
Website Reviews
Issues and Research
Report on the State of History Education
Research Briefs
Roundtables
Best Practices
Examples of Historical Thinking
Teaching in Action
Teaching with Textbooks
Using Primary Sources
TAH Projects
Lessons Learned
Project Directors Conference
Project Spotlight
TAH Projects
About
Staff
Partners
Technical Working Group
Research Advisors
Teacher Representatives
Privacy
Quiz Rules
Blog
Outreach
Teaching History.org logo and contact info

The "Daisy" Ad

May 28 2012
Instructions
Screencap, Daisy ad, 1964, Living Room Candidate, Museum of the Moving Image

During the 1964 presidential campaign, the advertising firm Doyle Dane Bernbach created one of the most famous political commercials of all time for President Lyndon Johnson, a democrat who was running for reelection against republican Senator Barry Goldwater. The ad ran only once, on September 7, 1964, during NBC's "Monday Night Movie," but was re-aired in its entirety the following night during all three network news broadcasts. Johnson won the election by a large margin in November 1964, with 61.1% of the popular vote.

First, watch the ad. As you’re watching, think about the ad's imagery, what it is trying to convey, the sounds in the ad, and the central message.

Now decide if the following statements were made during the campaign.

  1. On May 24, 1964, Goldwater told a television interviewer that one strategy for winning the war in Vietnam might involve "defoliation of the forests by low-yield atomic weapons."

    True

    False

  2. During the Republican primary, Goldwater's opponent, Nelson Rockefeller, claimed to agree with Goldwater's stance on nuclear weapons and safety.

    True

    False

  3. Executives at Doyle Dane Bernbach eagerly accepted the Johnson campaign account when the Democrats approached them in the summer of 1963, later explaining to Johnson's advisers, "We are deadly afraid of Goldwater and feel that the world must be handed a Johnson landslide."

    True

    False

  4. In response to the ad, Republican National Committee chairman Dean Burch said, "If they want to play hardball, we'll play hardball right back."

    True

    False