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African American History Month: Civil Rights Worldwide

Feb 6 2012
Instructions
Print, Anthony Burns, c.1855, Library of Congess

From the founding of the U.S. to the present day, countless individuals have fought to expand the rights and freedoms of specific groups, including African Americans. But did the influence of these individuals end at the borders of the U.S.?

Here are four 19th-century African Americans who fought for civil rights. What countries other than the U.S. did their work affect?


  1. Robert Morris Sr. (1823–1882) practiced law in Massachusetts and filed Roberts v. City of Boston, an early case against school desegregation. Following the Civil War, he also represented many immigrants from which country?
    A.

    Ireland

    B.

    China

    C.

    Australia

    D.

    Japan


  2. Mary Ann Shadd founded a desegregationist and abolitionist newspaper, the Provincial Freeman, several years after leaving the U.S. in protest against the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850. Which country was she living in when she founded the paper?
    A.

    Australia

    B.

    France

    C.

    Canada

    D.

    Spain


  3. George Washington Williams wrote two of the first thorough histories of African Americans, modeling techniques historians still use today. Near the end of his life, he used his research skills when he visited and reported back on conditions where?
    A.

    the Congo Free State

    B.

    Canada

    C.

    Mexico

    D.

    France


  4. Frederick Douglass escaped slavery in 1838 and went on to become a famous abolitionist, speaking and writing against slavery. From 1845 to 1847, he toured and lectured with abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison in which two places?
    A.

    Canada and Mexico

    B.

    Haiti and the Dominican Republic

    C.

    Australia and France

    D.

    Ireland and England