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Give Me (Nuclear) Shelter

Feb 20 2012
Instructions

Cold War public fears about a nuclear attack on the United States peaked about 50 years ago. The government encouraged people at that time to build fallout shelters in their homes. How much do you know about this effort?


  1. In 1961, the U.S. Department of Agriculture published Family Food Stockpile for Survival, which recommended stocking home fallout shelters with enough water and food to last how long?
    A.

    Two days

    B.

    One week

    C.

    Two weeks

    D.

    One month


  2. Which of the following was not an argument made to the public for building private home fallout shelters?
    A.

    If the Soviets knew U.S. citizens had built enough shelters to survive a nuclear strike, they would be discouraged from attacking.

    B.

    The government could not realistically provide and supply public shelters for the entire population.

    C.

    The short warning time of an imminent attack meant that most people would not be able to travel to public shelters before the blast.

    D.

    If people built private fallout shelters, it would diminish their sense of panic and helplessness over the nuclear threat, no matter whether the shelters would actually protect them during and after an attack.


  3. The public made all of the following arguments against building home fallout shelters except:
    A.

    Not many people could survive being cooped up underground for long periods of time.

    B.

    Shelters were not only expensive and difficult to build, but often failed to meet housing code requirements for light, sanitation facilities, and ventilation.

    C.

    Encouraging people to build shelters would divert their attention to surviving nuclear war, not preventing nuclear war, which was the only real hope.

    D.

    Private shelters would promote an ethic of saving one’s own skin, without regard for others.


  4. The CONELRAD emergency frequencies to which the public could tune their AM dials to receive civil defense information while still in their fallout shelters were:
    A.

    750 or 1500 kHz

    B.

    640 or 1240 kHz

    C.

    520 or 1610 kHz

    D.

    600 or 1600 kHz