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Socks to War

Oct 17 2011
Instructions
Photo, I'm Knitting a (Full-Size) Sock, Jul. 2, 2007, kpwerker, Flickr

Do common, unremarkable objects have a place in U.S. history? Of course! Take the humble sock, for instance. Whenever the U.S. goes to war, hundreds of knitters take up needles to make socks (and other knitted goods) for soldiers and civilians in need. What is the history of this practice? Answer the questions below to learn more.

    I can with Pleasure inform you, that Industry is so prevalent in this Metropolis, that within six months a Lady of Distinction, tho’ infirm, and of a very delicate Constitution, has knit thirty-six Pairs of Stockings, besides having the care of a large Family.


  1. This newspaper quote was written in the years leading up to which war?
    A.

    French and Indian War

    B.

    American Revolution

    C.

    War of 1812

    D.

    Civil War

  2. Poster, Our boys need sox - knit your bit American Red Cross, c. 1914-1918, Library of Congress


  3. This poster urged civilians to knit socks during which war?
    A.

    American Revolution

    B.

    World War I

    C.

    World War II

    D.

    Vietnam

  4. We’re in the field—then send us thread,
    As much as you can spare,
    And socks we’ll furnish for our troops,
    Yea, thousands through the year.
    Ho for the knitting needle, then,
    To work without delay.
    Hurrah! we’ll try our best to knit
    A pair of socks a day!


  5. During which war was this poem written and published?
    A.

    American Revolution

    B.

    Civil War

    C.

    World War I

    D.

    World War II

  6. Purl two, knit one
    Our trials I know have begun
    And while you are fighting each battle through
    My darling, my heart’s with you


  7. These are lyrics from a song written during which war?
    A.

    Civil War

    B.

    World War I

    C.

    World War II

    D.

    Vietnam