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Spot the President: Presidential Campaign Ads

Feb 14 2010
Instructions

Every four years, television programs break for ads for those most American of products—the U.S. president and the ideals of democracy. For more than half a century, presidential candidates have used television ads to communicate their platforms and criticize their opponents. Decide whether the following statements are true or false.

  1. The advertising executive who planned the first candidate television ad campaign had previously created the Coca-Cola “Passport to refreshment” campaign.

    True

    False

  2. In 1960, John F. Kennedy’s television ad campaign included non-English-language advertisements.

    True

    False

  3. As the Vietnam War continued despite his promises to end it, Richard Nixon’s 1972 presidential ad campaign depicted him as stern and focused entirely on withdrawing troops from Vietnam.

    True

    False

  4. A 1984 ad for Ronald Reagan’s reelection used the threat of a bear in the woods to suggest the need for better gun control laws.

    True

    False