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Junipero Serra Museum [CA]

The Junípero Serra Museum is one of the most familiar landmarks in San Diego. As a major symbol of the city, it stands atop the hill recognized as the site where California began. It was here in 1769 that a Spanish Franciscan missionary, Father Junípero Serra, with a group of soldiers led by Gaspar de Portolá, established Alta California's first mission and presidio (fort). On July 16, 1769, near the site where the museum now stands, Serra founded the Mission San Diego de Alcalá. Often confused for the Mission, the Serra Museum was built between 1928–1929 for the purpose of housing and showcasing the collection of the San Diego Historical Society, which was founded in 1928. The structure was designed by architect, William Templeton Johnson, using Spanish Revival architecture, to resemble the early missions that once dominated the landscape of Southern California.

The museum offers exhibits, tours, and educational programs.

 
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