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Washington Crossing State Park and Johnson Ferry House [NJ]

On December 25, 1776, the icy waters of the Delaware River provided the setting for one of the pivotal events of the American Revolution. The Continental Army had little to celebrate that Christmas and seemed beaten by hunger and cold. After crossing the rough winter river at night, General George Washington and the Continental Army landed at Johnson's Ferry, at the site now known as Washington Crossing State Park. At 4 am, they began their march to Trenton where they defeated the Hessian troops in an unexpected attack. This battle was quickly followed by the Second Battle of Trenton on January 2, 1777, and the Battle of Princeton on January 3, 1777. The Johnson Ferry House, an early 18th-century gambrel roof farmhouse and tavern near the Delaware River, was owned by Garret Johnson, who operated a 490-acre colonial plantation and a ferry service across the river in the 1700s. The house was likely used briefly by General Washington and other officers at the time of the Christmas night crossing of the Delaware. The keeping room, bedchamber, and textile room are furnished with local period pieces, probably similar to the furniture used by the Johnson family from 1740 to 1770. The site also includes an 18th-century kitchen garden.

The site offers exhibits, tours, demonstrations, short film screenings, and occasional recreational and educational events (including living history events).

 
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